2

I tried Mono - it creates serializers in 1 millisecond vs 60 by .NET 4.0. May be somebody ported Mono serializers generator as reusable lib? Or can give me exact list of Mono assemblies to use if I will try to port?


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace serialization
{
    [Serializable]
    public sealed class UserCredentials1
    {
        public string Username { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("Username: {0}, Password: {1}", Username, Password);
        }
    }

    [Serializable]
    public sealed class UserCredentials2
    {
        public string Username { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("Username: {0}, Password: {1}", Username, Password);
        }
    }

    //.NET 4.0
    //native=60.757
    //compiled=2.2602
    //Username: CTTTOM, Password: WoEIPX6Qqf11j9vKn01bAA==

    //MONO:
    //mono serialization.exe
    //native=0.1589
    //compiled=0.1337
    //Username: CTTTOM, Password: WoEIPX6Qqf11j9vKn01bAA==

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string xml1 = @"      " +
             @" CTTTOM" +
        @" WoEIPX6Qqf11j9vKn01bAA==" +
                 @"";

            string xml2 = @"" +
@" CTTTOM" +
@" WoEIPX6Qqf11j9vKn01bAA==" +
     @"";

            //warm up
            Type targetType1 = typeof(UserCredentials1);
            XmlSerializer nativeSerializer1 = new XmlSerializer(targetType1);
            Type targetType2 = typeof(UserCredentials2);
            nativeSerializer1.Deserialize(new XmlTextReader(new StringReader(xml1)));

            var native = new Stopwatch();
            native.Start();
            XmlSerializer nativeSerializer2 = new XmlSerializer(targetType2);
            native.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("native=" + native.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            var compiled = new Stopwatch();
            compiled.Start();
            var de = nativeSerializer2.Deserialize(new XmlTextReader(new StringReader(xml2)));
            compiled.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("compiled=" + compiled.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
            Console.Write(de.ToString());
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

EDIT

I made first step to migration, see https://github.com/asd-and-Rizzo/mono . Done test with generic list of objects using "mono serialization.exe", mouse click run with .NET serialization and ported Mono serialization. Ported version gives ~10 times faster default serializers generation then .NET one.

EDIT

Found in MSDN regarding XML serialization configuration .NET 4.5 (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229754.aspx):

useLegacySerializationGeneration Specifies whether the XmlSerializer uses legacy serialization generation which generates assemblies by writing C# code to a file and then compiling it to an assembly. The default is false.

  • Try converting your edit to an answer. – Joel Coehoorn Oct 25 '12 at 13:37
  • I am not sure why got speed up, because ported Mono serializer still compiled using Microsoft native compiler on .NET CLR. I though that running in Mono CLR was faster because they had managed compiler loaded inside AppDomain. I put this port into our QA drop and wait until results. Comparing perceived quality of Mono vs .NET code(Mono code looks less tested and rechecked) and considering strange speed up I will wait until making answer. Mean while will try to use Mono compiler instead Microsoft in port. – Dzmitry Lahoda Oct 25 '12 at 14:20
2

Made port which can be build and used against .NET 3.5.


extern alias mono;
using XmlSerializer = mono::System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer;

https://github.com/asd-and-Rizzo/mono/blob/master/mcs/class/System.XML/Mono.Xml.Serialization.sln

Mono does not compiles serializers.

Could be interesting to try managed Mono.CSharp.dll to compile serializers.

EDIT

I added several tests could go to Mono trunk. All my changes related only to port are under EXTEND_EMBRACE_XMLSER compilation symbol.

Our product tests noted that Mono serializes and deserializes what .NET does not. It is even better for our case, bat can be problem for others if error expected. All tests are commited to System.Xml tests.

public class HardlySerializableObject
{
    private HardlySerializableObject() { }

    public HardlySerializableObject(object value) { }

    public string Property1 { get { return "^_^"; } }

    public int Property2 { get; private set; }

    public static HardlySerializableObject Create()
    {
        return new HardlySerializableObject("any");
    }

    protected bool Equals(HardlySerializableObject other)
    {
        return Property2 == other.Property2 && Property1 == other.Property1;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
        if (obj.GetType() != this.GetType()) return false;
        return Equals((HardlySerializableObject)obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Property2;
    }
}

EDIT2

When to serialize one object of type A and try do deserialize other object of type B from that string then:

  • .NET throws InvalidOperationException.
  • Mono throws XmlException.
  • Seems Mono and .NET throw different errors if to serialize string and try to deserialize from it SomeCustomObject. – Dzmitry Lahoda Apr 17 '13 at 20:54
0

Mono is not really faster. It is different.

It appears that Mono starts by doing the xml serialization/deserialization via reflection (so instantiating the serializer is fast, but actually serializing with it is slow), and then it does the generation of the temporary assembly for fast serialization in the background.

From my playing with it, mono generally fails at creating the temporary assembly too. This means that your serialization/deserialization will always be significantly slower than the standard .NET one.

  • 2
    I made tests and serialization is not significally slower in my case. 4.5 seems goes the way of Mono. For for me it is very grounded. – Dzmitry Lahoda Apr 17 '13 at 20:57
  • Apologies, I should have actually tested the speed before claiming that. I assumed that since Mono went to the trouble of trying to generate the serializers in the background that it did it for a good reason. It is very interesting (and great for startup performance) that 4.5 has ditched the c# compiler dependency - I can only guess that Mono will eliminate the background dependency on it eventually as well. – aggieNick02 Apr 18 '13 at 21:56
  • 1
    Also, just as an interesting fact. The .NET serializer generation can be quite slow. We are making a few for the app I am working on and it adds a good 3 seconds to warm launch time on some older machines. – aggieNick02 Apr 18 '13 at 21:58
  • Essetially there are 3 options: – Dzmitry Lahoda Apr 19 '13 at 13:56
  • Generate code during compilation, generate mappings via reflection in runtime, generate code (IL or C#) during runtime. In my case I could go only Second in order to improve reading generic settings at Desktop app start. – Dzmitry Lahoda Apr 19 '13 at 14:01

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