2

I am a bit puzzled about this. When default stack allocated object construction is allowed as member varaiable of other struct, why not parameterized construction ? Does Most Vexing Parse has anything to do with this ? I tried on C++0X as well at ideone and got the same result.

struct foo{
    foo() {}
    foo(int i) {}
};

struct bar{
  foo obj;      // Allowed
  foo obj2(10); // Not Allowed
};

Error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before numeric constant

IdeOne Demo

5

Your link to Most Vexing Parse discusses instantiation of non-member variables (variables which are not a member of a class/struct). The example you've shown is that of member variables being declared in a struct; for which you would typically initialise them in a constructor

struct bar
{
    foo obj;
    foo obj2;
    bar() : obj2(10) {}
};

The Most Vexing Parse problem occurs in situations such as the below:

struct baz
{
    baz(int n) {}
};

void foo()
{
    baz meow(int());
}

where the identifier meow appears to be a function declaration of type baz (int), due to the 'most vexing parse' issues described in your link. (the int() which at first glance appears to be default-initialisation actually turns out to be simply the data type int)

1

write

struct bar {
  foo obj;
  foo obj2;
  foo(): obj2(10) {}
}

This way, when instantiating bar, obj2 construction will be made with 10.

1

Prior to C++11, you couldn't initialize members in the declaration unless they were static const and integral.

In C++11, you can use uniform initialization and in-class member initializtion:

foo obj2{10};

Since the constructor is not explicit, you can also do this:

foo obj2 = 10;

Not in C++11, you have to use a member initializer in the constructor list.

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