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This question already has an answer here:

C# 4.0. How can the following be done using lambda expressions?

int[] a = new int[8] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
// Now fetch every second element so that we get { 0, 2, 4, 6 }

marked as duplicate by Robert MacLean, Kirk Woll c# Jul 29 '14 at 14:32

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int[] list = a.Where((value, index) => index % 2 == 0)
              .ToArray();

It will only select even indexes, as calculate by the % (mod) operator .

5 % 2 // returns 1
4 % 2 // returns 0

According to MSDN:

% Operator

  • 1
    +1, I forgot, that where also has overload with index :) – Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 26 '12 at 7:56
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Another approach using Enumerable.Range

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, a.Length/2)
                       .Select(i => a[2*i])
                       .ToArray();

Or use bitwise for more efficient to check even:

var result = a.Where((i, index) => (index & 1) == 0)
              .ToArray();
8

The remainder operator is your friend.

int[] everySecond = a.Where((i, ind) => ind % 2 == 0).ToArray();

% Operator (C# Reference)

The % operator computes the remainder after dividing its first operand by its second. All numeric types have predefined remainder operators.

E.Lippert: What's the difference? Remainder vs Modulus

  • 1
    +1 for the E.Lippert link. – Askolein Oct 26 '12 at 8:13

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