0

I'm sure I'm doing something really obviously wrong here, but I can't figure out what. Using grep from a bash shell, I have a file test.txt:

ABC123
ABC456
ABC789
DEF123
DEF456
DEF789

Now at the command line:

$ grep ABC test2.txt
ABC123
ABC456
ABC789

$ grep DEF test2.txt
DEF123
DEF456
DEF789

So those work great. Now, I expect the following command to print the whole file, but:

$ grep ABC\|DEF test2.txt

$ grep (ABC)\|(DEF) test2.txt
-bash: syntax error near unexpected token `ABC'

$ grep \(ABC\)\|\(DEF\) test2.txt

$ grep 'ABC|DEF' test2.txt

What am I doing wrong?

3

Turn on the extended regex with -E:

grep -E "ABC|DEF" test2.txt
2

As others have pointed out, standard grep command does not support the or syntax. Unfortunately, from there, things are a mishmash.

  • Some systems have a egrep that does offer or syntax.
  • Some systems can use a -E or -P (for Perl) flag to extend grep syntax.
  • Some systems have both the -E and egrep that do the same thing. This implies that there are systems out there where grep -E and egrep are not the same. (sad but true).
  • Some systems now use the extended regular expressions in their standard grep command. Apparently, your system doesn't.

Read your manpages to see what your system does support. Some systems have a manpage for re_formatthat will explain what they support and don't support in extended format.

Then again, you could always just use a Perl one-liner:

$ perl -ne "print if /(ABC)|(DEF)/" test.txt

At least you know all the stuff that supports.

1

I don't think standard syntax supports it. You could use -P switch if available:

grep -P "(ABC|DEF)" test2.txt
1

Use egrep instead, which is the same as using grep -E:

egrep 'ABC|DEF' test2.txt

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