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C++ operator % guarantees

In c++ 98/03

5.6-4

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined; otherwise (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a. If both operands are nonnegative then the remainder is nonnegative; if not, the sign of the remainder is implementation-defined.

In c++ 11:

5.6 -4

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined. For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded;81 if the quotient a/b is representable in the type of the result, (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a.

As you can see the implementation-defined for the sign bit is missing, what happens to it ?

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  • What are you trying to do? And how this comes as a obstacle for that? Oct 27, 2012 at 13:49
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    @AnandVeeramani: some people just want to avoid undefined (or, in this case, implementation-defined) behavior. I'm glad he asked this, I have avoided modulo when the values could have been negative.
    – moswald
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:01
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    Also, see: stackoverflow.com/q/3609572/485561
    – Mankarse
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:03
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    C++ 98/03 also had this footnote: "According to work underway toward the revision of ISO C, the preferred algorithm for integer division follows the rules defined in the ISO Fortran standard, ISO/IEC 1539:1991, in which the quotient is always rounded toward zero" C++11 simply made that a requirement of the standard (as C99 did for C). Removing the implementation defined part of the % operator is a consequence of that. Oct 27, 2012 at 15:21
  • @moswald: you would have to avoid using / operator in those cases as well, since it is similarly implementation defined. Oct 27, 2012 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

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The behaviour of % was tightened in C++11, and is now fully specified (apart from division by 0).

The combination of truncation towards zero and the identity (a/b)*b + a%b == a implies that a%b is always positive for positive a and negative for negative a.


The mathematical reason for this is as follows:

Let ÷ be mathematical division, and / be C++ division.

For any a and b, we have a÷b = a/b + f (where f is the fractional part), and from the standard, we also have (a/b)*b + a%b == a.

a/b is known to truncate towards 0, so we know that the fractional part will always be positive if a÷b is positive, and negative is a÷b is negative:

sign(f) == sign(a)*sign(b)

a÷b = a/b + f can be rearranged to give a/b = a÷b - f. a can be expanded as (a÷b)*b:

(a/b)*b + a%b == a => (a÷b - f)*b+a%b == (a÷b)*b.

Now the left hand side can also be expanded:

(a÷b)*b - f*b + a%b == (a÷b)*b

a%b == f*b

Recall from earlier that sign(f)==sign(a)*sign(b), so:

sign(a%b) == sign(f*b) == sign(a)*sign(b)*sign(b) == sign(a)

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  • @mata: The sign is only determined by a, you have messed up the arithmetic there (-1/2) = -0.5 = 0 (after truncation), so 0 + x = -1, so x = -1.
    – Mankarse
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:26
  • @Mankarse:The equation is always there (as in 03 standard), the only thing new seems to be what's so called 'truncation towards zero'. What this 'truncation towards zero' all about ?
    – RoundPi
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:26
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    @Gob00st: Truncation towards zero means that the fractional part of the result of a division is discarded in the result, so 5/4 == 1.25 => 1 (discard 0.25), and -7/4 == -1.75 => -1 (discard -0.75).
    – Mankarse
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:28
  • Yes that's always there isn't it ? What I meant was how's this implies "that a%b is always positive for positive a and negative for negative a." ? Whereas in 03 standard is not.
    – RoundPi
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:31
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    @JorgeLuque: Technically you need to buy the C++ Standard from ISO of from one of the national standards bodies, but the final draft of the standard is freely available, and is usually very very similar to the official standard. See isocpp.org.
    – Mankarse
    Mar 7, 2016 at 1:42
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The algorithm says (a/b)*b + a%b = a, which is easier to read if you remember that it's truncate(a/b)*b + a%b = a Using algebra, a%b = a - truncate(a/b)*b. That is to say, f(a,b) = a - truncate(a/b)*b. For what values is f(a,b) < 0?

It doesn't matter if b is negative or positive. It cancels itself out because it appears in the numerator and the denominator. Even if truncate(a/b) = 0 and b is negative, well, it's going to be canceled out when it's a product of 0.

Therefore, it is only the sign of a that determines the sign of f(a,b), or a%b.

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  • The equation is always there as in 03 standard as well ...
    – RoundPi
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:27
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    @Gob00st: The difference is that in C++03, rounding of divisions was not fully specified.
    – Mankarse
    Oct 27, 2012 at 14:31

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