I'm about to write some software for an academic research project. I'm hoping to write it in Java, but the group I'm working with raised some concerns about licensing. I originally though these were silly questions, but I'm having trouble finding definitive answers:

If I write software in Java, am I free to release that software and its source code? Are there restrictions on how I can license it? Does Oracle have any rights to it?

closed as off topic by Ben, Bart Kiers, Mark, Richard Harrison, Maerlyn Oct 28 '12 at 13:22

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    What does the license agreement say? – ta.speot.is Oct 28 '12 at 1:37
  • 6
    Thousands of businesses rely on the fact that Oracle does not claim rights on their code. This seems like a de facto non-issue to me. – Matt Ball Oct 28 '12 at 1:41
  • 3
    Yeah, I've been writing and distributing java for over 13 years, Oracle has been at the helm a few years now, but its still the same. Your source is your source. – chrislhardin Oct 28 '12 at 1:44
  • 1
    This is a nice change from. "I want to change some source for a Jar I got, you don't need to know where it came from." +1 for the ethics of the group. (But yeah, as noted, there are no conditions/requirement on revealing your own source.) – Andrew Thompson Oct 28 '12 at 2:04
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If I write software in Java, am I free to release that software and its source code?

Absolutely.

Are there restrictions on how I can license it?

None whatsoever. (Or at least, not based on the fact that it is written in Java.)

Does Oracle have any rights to it?

No.

The only (possibly) relevant rights Oracle have are to do with your distributing modified versions of the Java platform ... or using the Java trademarks inappropriately.

... but the group I'm working with raised some concerns about licensing.

It is safe to say that the people who raised those concerns haven't got a clue.

No Oracle does not have rights to your code. It will be your software.

  • But what if your software includes an implementation of rangeCheck? – ta.speot.is Oct 28 '12 at 7:53
  • @ta.speot.is - If it is your implementation of rangeCheck there are no concerns. If you are redistributing an unmodified copy of an Oracle JRE, there are no concerns. (It is expressly permitted.) If you start copying Oracle source code into your code-base, then it depends on where you got the code from. (The OpenJDK source code is GPL. That wouldn't give Oracle rights to your code, but it may constrain the way that you can distribute it.) – Stephen C Oct 29 '12 at 4:07

I'm not a lawyer; I'd recommend that you get one to be sure.

With that said, I think the concern is overblown. Everyone who writes a Java application is not obligated to turn over source to Oracle or anyone else.

It makes no sense - how could Java have been so widely adopted if that were the case?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.