28

I'm reading the Javascript Guide from Mozilla And when they contrasted JS to Java , It got me thinking, Java code is easily split up with each class in his own file. after futher search , I understand that the same can be accomplished in JS with namespacing and module pattern - I messed around with it but got very confused ( especially with calling a constructor declared in File1.js into File2.js )

so here is the hierarchy:  class organization

But i just can't figure out how to properly make it works

how do i simply go from

//employe.js
function Employee () {
  this.name = "";
  this.dept = "general";
}

function Manager () {
  this.reports = [];
}
Manager.prototype = new Employee;

function WorkerBee () {
  this.projects = [];
}
WorkerBee.prototype = new Employee;

function SalesPerson () {
  this.dept = "sales";
  this.quota = 100;
}
SalesPerson.prototype = new WorkerBee;

to this :

 // employe.js
function Employee () {
  this.name = "";
  this.dept = "general";
}

 // Manager.js   
function Manager () {
  this.reports = [];
}
Manager.prototype = new Employee;

 // WorkerBee.js     
function WorkerBee () {
  this.projects = [];
}
WorkerBee.prototype = new Employee;

 // SalesPerson.js      
function SalesPerson () {
 this.dept = "sales";
 this.quota = 100; 
 }
SalesPerson.prototype = new WorkerBee;
5
  • 2
    All you have to do is include the files in the correct order. Oct 28, 2012 at 2:04
  • @FelixKling: As the code only declares the constructor functions and doesn't create anything, the order that the files are included doesn't even matter.
    – Guffa
    Oct 28, 2012 at 2:08
  • @Guffa: It does, they are creating an instance for prototype inheritance, e.g. Manager.prototype = new Employee;. Oct 28, 2012 at 2:12
  • @FelixKling: Oh, you are right. I stand corrected. They do need to be included in the right order.
    – Guffa
    Oct 28, 2012 at 2:14
  • If using modern classes, I solved this problem like so: stackoverflow.com/a/62142995/1599699
    – Andrew
    Jun 2, 2020 at 0:29

3 Answers 3

20

You should have one global namespacing object which every module has to access and write to. Modify your files like so:

// employe.js

window.myNameSpace = window.myNameSpace || { };

myNameSpace.Employee = function() {
    this.name = "";
    this.dept = "general";
};

and Manager.js could look like

// Manager.js

window.myNameSpace = window.myNameSpace || { };

myNameSpace.Manager = function() {
    this.reports = [];
}
myNameSpace.Manager.prototype = new myNameSpace.Employee;

This is of course a very simplified example. Because the order of loading files and dependencies is not child-play. There are some good librarys and patterns available, I recommend you looking at requireJS and AMD or CommonJS module patterns. http://requirejs.org/

3
  • this make perfect sense, thank you - I looked at requireJS but I didn't quite understood how it would help me here - I think I'm confusing between require php style and JS
    – MimiEAM
    Oct 28, 2012 at 3:14
  • 1
    I'm guessing you added window.myNameSpace = window.myNameSpace || { }; in each file to avoid any loading errors. Is that correct?
    – zachdyer
    May 27, 2016 at 4:18
  • @zachdyer I'd agree. Just check how EaseIJS does: github.com/CreateJS/EaselJS/blob/master/src/easeljs/filters/…, it does the same trick
    – user5066707
    Nov 30, 2016 at 10:25
8

You don't need to do anything differently. Just include the script files and they work as if it was a single file.

Javascript doesn't have file scope. Once the code is parsed it doesn't matter where the code came from.

5
  • 3
    True - but its whether good practice nor convenient. You should mention that this only works because the global object is the variable object for itself and hence, all var and function declarations are implicitly written to it. Clobbering the global object like so is still bad karma.
    – jAndy
    Oct 28, 2012 at 2:13
  • 1
    @jAndy: Yes, you are right that keeping the identifiers out of the global scope is better practice, but it's not a step that is at all needed to put the code in separate files.
    – Guffa
    Oct 28, 2012 at 2:17
  • @Guffa I keep reading that we should avoid "polluting" the global scope is there a other reason beside not exposing a variable that we do not want to modify ?
    – MimiEAM
    Oct 28, 2012 at 3:19
  • 3
    @MimiEAM: Yes. When you use more than one script library in a page, the risk that their identifiers clash is less if they define less global identifiers.
    – Guffa
    Oct 28, 2012 at 9:54
  • This is not true for JS classes today.
    – Andrew
    Jun 2, 2020 at 0:09
5

For small and medium projects like a website or game, the native namespacing and constructors work very well. They are a poor choice when the loading order is too complex to handle without some sort of autoloading.

index.html:

<script src="Employee.js"></script>
<script src="Manager.js"></script>

Manager.js:

var Manager = function() {
    var employee1 = new window.Employee(this);
    var employee2 = new window.Employee(this);
};

Employee.js:

var Employee = function(boss) {
    // work stuff here
    this.wage = 5;
};

Note, properties inside the employee constructor function are visible to the manager. The new word signals a constructor. This is also possible without a constructor by returning an object with properties instead of a function as shown above.

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