238

I am working with Titanium, my code looks like this:

var currentData = new Array();

if(currentData[index]!==""||currentData[index]!==null||currentData[index]!=='null')
{
    Ti.API.info("is exists  " + currentData[index]);
    return true;
}
else
{   
    return false;
}

I am passing an index to the array currentData. I am still not able to detect a non-existing element using above code.

1
  • 2
    Your logic is wrong. You need conjunctions (&&) between the individual conditions. – J. K. Oct 28 '12 at 9:59

19 Answers 19

461

Use typeof arrayName[index] === 'undefined'

i.e.

if(typeof arrayName[index] === 'undefined') {
    // does not exist
}
else {
    // does exist
}
7
  • 5
    +1, nice. You can also use if(arrayName[index] === 'undefined') as a shortcut – AnchovyLegend Oct 8 '13 at 0:08
  • 82
    @AnchovyLegend no, you cannot! But you can use if(arrayName[index] === undefined). – Denis V Nov 29 '13 at 15:01
  • 26
    this fails, if the item is there, but it's value is undefined; use this answer instead -> stackoverflow.com/questions/1098040/… – Matus May 17 '14 at 21:25
  • as @Matus said, there is more explanation here, you should be aware on. – S.Thiongane Aug 8 '14 at 8:47
  • 1
    for if(arrayName[index] === undefined) you may use even shorter one which is if(!arrayName[index]) – Park JongBum Jul 17 '18 at 14:09
94
var myArray = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];

if (myArray.indexOf(searchTerm) === -1) {
  console.log("element doesn't exist");
}
else {
  console.log("element found");
}
3
  • 3
    Unfortunately, this one doesn't work in IE 7 and below. – darksoulsong Oct 7 '14 at 15:21
  • 4
    This in my opinion is the best answer, by now IE 7 is not mainteined any more so it's not a problem. Although I will suggest to use the triple equals if(myArray.indexOf(searchTerm) === -1) – Mauro Gava Sep 1 '16 at 2:49
  • 4
    The OP was looking to see if the given index number exists. This is checking if a given value exists. – jonathan.s Mar 7 '19 at 17:53
14

Someone please correct me if i'm wrong, but AFAIK the following is true:

  1. Arrays are really just Objects under the hood of JS
  2. Thus, they have the prototype method hasOwnProperty "inherited" from Object
  3. in my testing, hasOwnProperty can check if anything exists at an array index.

So, as long as the above is true, you can simply:

const arrayHasIndex = (array, index) => Array.isArray(array) && array.hasOwnProperty(index);

usage:

arrayHasIndex([1,2,3,4],4); outputs: false

arrayHasIndex([1,2,3,4],2); outputs: true

2
6

This is exactly what the in operator is for. Use it like this:

if (index in currentData) 
{ 
    Ti.API.info(index + " exists: " + currentData[index]);
}

The accepted answer is wrong, it will give a false negative if the value at index is undefined:

const currentData = ['a', undefined], index = 1;

if (index in currentData) {
  console.info('exists');
}
// ...vs...
if (typeof currentData[index] !== 'undefined') {
  console.info('exists');
} else {
  console.info('does not exist'); // incorrect!
}

5

I had to wrap techfoobar's answer in a try..catch block, like so:

try {
  if(typeof arrayName[index] == 'undefined') {
    // does not exist
  }
  else {
  // does exist
  }
} 
catch (error){ /* ignore */ }

...that's how it worked in chrome, anyway (otherwise, the code stopped with an error).

1
  • This should only have "broken" with an error if the variable arrayName itself (or index) did not exist. Simply accessing an undefined array element should not have resulted in an "error"? – MrWhite Oct 11 '19 at 21:12
3

If elements of array are also simple objects or arrays, you can use some function:

// search object
var element = { item:'book', title:'javasrcipt'};

[{ item:'handbook', title:'c++'}, { item:'book', title:'javasrcipt'}].some(function(el){
    if( el.item === element.item && el.title === element.title ){
        return true; 
     } 
});

[['handbook', 'c++'], ['book', 'javasrcipt']].some(function(el){
    if(el[0] == element.item && el[1] == element.title){
        return true;
    }
});
1
  • some is the modernest way around here. It also can even become a one-liner like myArray.some(el => el.item === element.item && el.title === element.title) – vahdet Nov 15 '19 at 8:00
3

Consider the array a:

var a ={'name1':1, 'name2':2}

If you want to check if 'name1' exists in a, simply test it with in:

if('name1' in a){
console.log('name1 exists in a')
}else
console.log('name1 is not in a')
3
  • 6
    "var a" is not an array object in your case, but a regular object. Should be var a = [ ... ]. I think this is what author needed. – tomazahlin Dec 16 '15 at 13:10
  • 4
    This is how to check for the existence of a key in an object, not the presence of an index in an array. – Ben Hull Feb 2 '17 at 0:58
  • The in operator seems to work with arrays too. Like 2 in [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] is true, but 6 in [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] is false. Just change your answer to array to be relevant. – Crouching Kitten Nov 19 '20 at 22:39
3
var demoArray = ['A','B','C','D'];
var ArrayIndexValue = 2;
if(ArrayIndexValue in demoArray){
   //Array index exists
}else{
   //Array Index does not Exists
}
1
  • What are you expecting ..what is the question actually? – Geeky Oct 31 '18 at 19:36
3

These days I would take advantage of ecmascript and use it like that

return myArr?.[index]
2

If you are looking for some thing like this.

Here is the following snippetr

var demoArray = ['A','B','C','D'];
var ArrayIndexValue = 2;
if(demoArray.includes(ArrayIndexValue)){
alert("value exists");
   //Array index exists
}else{
alert("does not exist");
   //Array Index does not Exists
}

2
  • This is the solution I am going to use im my project today. I have no idea why there were downvotes - this works best for my use case, which is server-side node.js / express. Thank you – mkrufky Dec 21 '18 at 1:53
  • @mkrufky because that is not what this question is for. we've long had the ability prior to Array.includes to check if a value is an array, like demoArray.indexOf(ArrayIndexValue) !== -1. this question is about checking whether the index exists in the array, which is an entirely different problem – r3wt Apr 3 '19 at 20:08
2

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
if(fruits.indexOf("Banana") == -1){
    console.log('item not exist')
} else {
	console.log('item exist')
}

1

If you use underscore.js then these type of null and undefined check are hidden by the library.

So your code will look like this -

var currentData = new Array();

if (_.isEmpty(currentData)) return false;

Ti.API.info("is exists  " + currentData[index]);

return true;

It looks much more readable now.

1
  • Even if your answer is right, I would just think twice for this. Your code would become underscore.js dependent only for checking an empty value. Just do a simple wrapper function isset(v) { return (typeof v !== 'undefined'); } – Heroselohim Nov 26 '14 at 14:55
1

Simple way to check item exist or not

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
    var i = this.length;
    while (i--)
       if (this[i] == obj)
       return true;
    return false;
}

var myArray= ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];

myArray.contains("Apple")
1
  • 4
    horribly inefficient. what if I set myArray[1000000] = 'Pear' then your function will take forever. – John Henckel Sep 6 '18 at 16:52
1

This way is easiest one in my opinion.

var nameList = new Array('item1','item2','item3','item4');

// Using for loop to loop through each item to check if item exist.

for (var i = 0; i < nameList.length; i++) {
if (nameList[i] === 'item1') 
{   
   alert('Value exist');
}else{
   alert('Value doesn\'t exist');
}

And Maybe Another way to do it is.

nameList.forEach(function(ItemList)
 {
   if(ItemList.name == 'item1')
        {
          alert('Item Exist');
        }
 }
1

When trying to find out if an array index exists in JS, the easiest and shortest way to do it is through double negation.

let a = [];
a[1] = 'foo';
console.log(!!a[0])   // false
console.log(!!a[1])   // true
1
  • what about a[1] = false? 0? ''? – AterLux Jan 22 at 13:16
1
const arr = []

typeof arr[0] // "undefined"

arr[0] // undefined

If boolean expression

typeof arr[0] !== typeof undefined

is true then 0 is contained in arr

0

you can simply use this:

var tmp = ['a', 'b'];
index = 3 ;
if( tmp[index]){
    console.log(tmp[index] + '\n');
}else{
    console.log(' does not exist');
}
1
  • 3
    wrong. what if tmp = [0,0,0,0] then tmp[3] should exist – John Henckel Sep 6 '18 at 16:50
0
(typeof files[1] === undefined)?
            this.props.upload({file: files}):
            this.props.postMultipleUpload({file: files widgetIndex: 0, id})

Check if the second item in the array is undefined using the typeof and checking for undefined

-1

This also works fine, testing by type against undefined.

if (currentData[index] === undefined){return}

Test:

const fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];

if (fruits["Raspberry"] === undefined){
  console.log("No Raspberry entry in fruits!")
}

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