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I am following a tutorial from Ray Wenderlich site and i am trying to understand this code where it has nsarray readonly and nsmutableble array with the same name but writable. Also what is the reason to use _(underscore)property vs setting a property and using self.x Here is the code: this is from the site

MatchmakingServer.h

@interface MatchmakingServer : NSObject <GKSessionDelegate>

@property (nonatomic, assign) int maxClients;
@property (nonatomic, strong, readonly) NSArray *connectedClients;
@property (nonatomic, strong, readonly) GKSession *session;

- (void)startAcceptingConnectionsForSessionID:(NSString *)sessionID;

@end

MatchmakingServer.m

#import "MatchmakingServer.h"

@implementation MatchmakingServer
{
    NSMutableArray *_connectedClients;
}

@synthesize maxClients = _maxClients;
@synthesize session = _session;

- (void)startAcceptingConnectionsForSessionID:(NSString *)sessionID
{
    _connectedClients = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:self.maxClients];

    _session = [[GKSession alloc] initWithSessionID:sessionID displayName:nil sessionMode:GKSessionModeServer];
    _session.delegate = self;
    _session.available = YES;
}

I am doing something like this instead

matchmakingserver.h

@interface zvMatchMakingServer : NSObject <GKSessionDelegate>

@property (nonatomic, assign) int maxClients;
@property (nonatomic, strong, readonly) NSArray *connectedClients;
@property (nonatomic, strong, readonly) GKSession *session;

- (void)startAcceptingConnectionsForSessionID:(NSString *)sessionID;


@end

matchmakingserver.m

@interface zvMatchMakingServer()

@property (nonatomic,strong) NSMutableArray *connectedClients;
@property (nonatomic, strong) GKSession *session;

@end

@implementation zvMatchMakingServer


-(NSArray *)connectedClients
{
    return self.connectedClients;
}

-(void)startAcceptingConnectionsForSessionID:(NSString *)sessionID
{
    self.connectedClients = [[NSMutableArray alloc]initWithCapacity:self.maxClients];
    self.session = [[GKSession alloc]initWithSessionID:sessionID displayName:nil sessionMode:GKSessionModeServer];

}

Is what i am doing basically the same thing or it won't work. Thank you!

  • I saw this question before but i am working with iOS 6 and i guess 5 the declaration is a little different so i am not sure how it works now with redeclaration. Also I am not sure if i had to use copy in my declaration of the property. – Yan Oct 28 '12 at 18:44
  • The only difference is that with the newest Apple LLVM compiler (note this has nothing to do with the iOS version), you don't have to include the @synthesize directive. The functionality has not changed. – Josh Caswell Oct 28 '12 at 18:46
  • So then what i am doing should work and is considered rediclaration? – Yan Oct 28 '12 at 19:07
1

I'll try to explain what happens in Ray's code:

He declares a property:

@property (nonatomic, strong, readonly) NSArray *connectedClients;

(I assume this was pre iOS 6, because in iOS 6 Apple changed the way properties generate iVars.)

This property causes the compiler to automatically generate an iVar NSArray *connectedClients. This iVar is not used in the code. Instead he's declaring a new (private) iVar named _connectedClients of type NSMutableArray. Note that he doesn't synthesize the accessors for the property. He writes the accessor himself and instead of returning the iVar generated by the property (connectedClients), he's returning his 'own' iVar (_connectedClients):

- (NSArray *)connectedClients
{
    return _connectedClients;
}

Since NSMutableArray is a subclass of NSArray there's no problem doing that.

What you're doing is trying to redeclare the property @property (nonatomic,strong) NSMutableArray *connectedClients; as private property and that's not allowed. Carefully compare your code to Ray's, then you'll see the difference.

As for the underscore:

That's only a convention many people use to name their iVars. It has no semantical meaning. In fact Apple changed the names of 'auto-generated' iVars to also use the underscore.

Pre iOS 6 a property

@property (...) SomeClass *name;

generated an iVar named name. In iOS 6 that same property generates an iVar named _name. Also in iOS 6 you don't need to add the @synthesize line anymore.

Prefixing names of iVars with an underscore was convenient because if you wanted to override an automatically generated accessor the autocompletion suggested this:

- (void)setName:(SomeClass *)name

if your iVar was also named name the parameter name would hide the iVar in the accessor implementation, so you had to change the name of the parameter. If you renamed your iVar by using @synthesize name = _name the parameter name did no longer hide it and you could use the autocompletion generated code for the accessor.

- (void)setName:(SomeClass *)name
{
    //maybe release the old value and retain the new one if you're not using ARC and weather it's a retained property or not. 
   _name = name;
}
  • Thank you very much for your reply and your explanation! So as i understand NSMutableArray *_connectedClients; means that he is declaring a totally new variable called _connectedClients which is not tied in with connectedClients and then he returns it in the getter of connectedClients. _connectedClients could be named anything name ex. prvConnectedClients. The underscore confused me a little. I thought they variables connected in some way. – Yan Oct 28 '12 at 18:32
  • That is correct. (If (and I'm not 100% sure about this) it's a pre iOS 6 'version', i.e. the synthesized iVar is named connectedClients, in iOS 6 the synthesized iVar would also be named _connectedClients, in which case the declaration in the @implementation part would override the auto-synthesized iVar. But the effect would be the same) – Tobi Oct 28 '12 at 18:43
  • Auto-synthesize has nothing to do with iOS version; it is a compiler feature. No ivar is created without a @synthesize, automatic or explicit. An @property directive only declares methods, not storage (i.e., an ivar). – Josh Caswell Oct 28 '12 at 18:48
  • The code works the way it is now. What about the whole redeclaration of properties. Does this apply here or it is something different? Thanks again! – Yan Oct 28 '12 at 18:49
  • @JoshCaswell You're right, I was not precise. The changes I was referring to (renaming auto-synthesized iVar and remove the need to explicitly call @synthesize) were applied to the LLVM compiler by the time Apple annouced iOS 6. But of course you're right, it has nothing to do with iOS, my bad :) – Tobi Oct 28 '12 at 19:07

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