29

I have this method:

public function getMonth ($month_name)
    {
        $q = $this->createQueryBuilder('m');

        $q->select('m')
            ->where('m.name = :name')    
            ->setParameter('name', $month_name);

        return $q->getQuery()->getResult();
    }

From it I expect to find one month or 0 months. I use this method in this way in my Controllers:

$month = $em->getRepository('EMExpensesBundle:Month')
                ->getMonth($this->findMonth());

            $month->setSpended($item->getPrice());

I tried this with getSingleResult() and everything was perfect untill I came across a case when no month was found and everything failed really bad!

Then I tried with getResult(), but it returns an array and then

$month->setSpended($item->getPrice());

is said to be called on a non-object and to fix it I should use everywhere

$month[0]->setSpended($item->getPrice());

Is there a more elegant way to achieve this without the need to add unnecesary [0] index everywhere?

2 Answers 2

67

Additionally, in Doctrine 2.1 you can use 'getOneOrNullResult'

http://doctrine-orm.readthedocs.org/en/latest/reference/dql-doctrine-query-language.html#query-result-formats

2
  • Better than doing try...catch in repository. Should be the answer to question! Commented Feb 6, 2016 at 15:17
  • 6
    Be careful, if there is more than one result it just returns an exception.. Not a null value. coderwall.com/p/prbrlw/doctrine-get-single-row-or-null : no result: return null // more than one result: throw a NonUniqueResultException exception
    – Delphine
    Commented Apr 28, 2016 at 8:51
33

If you use getSingleResult, Doctrine throws a \Doctrine\ORM\NoResultException, which you can catch and handle it. If you want to catch this directly in the Repository, I would suggest:

public function getMonth ($month_name)
{
    $q = $this->createQueryBuilder('m');

    $q->select('m')
        ->where('m.name = :name')    
        ->setParameter('name', $month_name);

    try {
        return $q->getQuery()->getResult(); 
        }
    catch(\Doctrine\ORM\NoResultException $e) {
        return new Month();
    }
}

Dont forget to add a use Your\Namespace\Month; or this will fail because it cannot find the Month class!

Of course you must also persist the Entity in case it is a new one. You could extend the catch block to look like this:

catch(\Doctrine\ORM\NoResultException $e) {
    $month = new Month();
    $this->_em->persist($month);

    return $month;
}

You could also catch the exception in your controller, making it more transparent. But this depends on your use cases and is best solved by yourself

0

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