26

I have a text like this:

foo bar
`which which`

If I do this using heredoc, I get a blank file:

➜  ~  echo <<EOT > out
heredoc> foo bar
heredoc> `which which`
heredoc> EOT
➜  ~  cat out

➜  ~  

How can I do this?

Edit

Oh sorry, I meant to do cat. Problem is that it writes this to the file: which: shell built-in command, ie, evaluations backticks. Any way to do this without evaluating?

With cat, I get

➜  ~  cat <<EOT > out
heredoc> foo bar
heredoc> `which which`
heredoc> EOT
➜  ~  cat out
foo bar
which: shell built-in command
➜  ~  

I don't want which which to be evaluated.

0

1 Answer 1

56

Quote the label to prevent the backticks from being evaluated.

$ cat << "EOT" > out
foo bar
`which which`
EOT

$ cat out
foo bar
`which which`
6
  • Oh sorry, I meant to do cat. Problem is that it writes this to the file: which: shell built-in command, ie, evaluations backticks. Any way to do this without evaluating? Oct 29, 2012 at 13:04
  • Quote the label to prevent the backticks from being evaluated.
    – dogbane
    Oct 29, 2012 at 13:06
  • 11
    FYI this will also disable other bash expression (such as variable evaluation) from occurring. To just disable backtick evaluation you can escape the backticks by adding a backslash, e.g. '\`' Feb 6, 2015 at 20:43
  • 22
    Why does this work?? There is no sanity in Bash.
    – tsbertalan
    Jul 27, 2016 at 12:54
  • 5
    Here's the relevant documentation on turning off substitution in here doc : tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/here-docs.html#EX71C, so there's 3 options : either \EOT, 'EOT' or "EOT".
    – bric3
    Jun 3, 2019 at 15:45

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