66

If I use array_agg to collect names, I get my names separated by commas, but in case there is a null value, that null is also taken as a name in the aggregate. For example :

SELECT g.id,
       array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'Y' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END) canonical_users,
       array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'N' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END) non_canonical_users
FROM groups g
GROUP BY g.id;

it returns ,Larry,Phil instead of just Larry,Phil (in my 9.1.2, it shows NULL,Larry,Phil). as in this fiddle

Instead, if I use string_agg(), it shows me only the names (without empty commas or nulls) like here

The problem is that I have Postgres 8.4 installed on the server, and string_agg() doesn't work there. Is there any way to make array_agg work similar to string_agg() ?

  • See this PostgreSQL mailing list thread on much this topic: postgresql.1045698.n5.nabble.com/… – Craig Ringer Oct 29 '12 at 14:16
  • I am sorry, I don't think there is a solution in that thread.. – Daud Oct 29 '12 at 14:33
  • There are two solutions in that thread. One is to create a function and the other (just suggested not shown) is the one I answered. – Clodoaldo Neto Oct 29 '12 at 14:37
  • @Clodoaldo - all the rows will have canonical in ('y','n')... so the where clause seems to be redundant. The problem is that inside a grouping, if the the value of the canonical field is 'Y', and we are collecting 'N's, then a null be collected too.. – Daud Oct 29 '12 at 14:44
  • Ok. Now I got it. Check the update answer. – Clodoaldo Neto Oct 29 '12 at 14:51
18

SQL Fiddle

select
    id,
    (select array_agg(a) from unnest(canonical_users) a where a is not null) canonical_users,
    (select array_agg(a) from unnest(non_canonical_users) a where a is not null) non_canonical_users
from (
    SELECT g.id,
           array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'Y' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END) canonical_users,
           array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'N' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END) non_canonical_users
    FROM groups g
    GROUP BY g.id
) s

Or, simpler and may be cheaper, using array_to_string which eliminates nulls:

SELECT
    g.id,
    array_to_string(
        array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'Y' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END)
        , ','
    ) canonical_users,
    array_to_string(
        array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'N' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END)
        , ','
    ) non_canonical_users
FROM groups g
GROUP BY g.id

SQL Fiddle

  • 2
    This won't work. Please try it in the fiddle I provided.. – Daud Oct 29 '12 at 14:32
  • Thanks. But if the main query (s) returns a 1000 rows, then the 2 subqueries (using unnest) will run once for each row.. Will it be better to tolerate NULLs than executing 2000 extra select queries ? – Daud Oct 29 '12 at 17:07
  • @Daud New version which could be cheaper. Take the explain output of both to be sure. – Clodoaldo Neto Oct 29 '12 at 17:34
  • 3
    @Clodoaldo If you're using array_to_string(array_agg(...)) you might as well use string_agg. – Craig Ringer Oct 29 '12 at 23:44
  • 1
    @Craig The problem in the question is 8.4 – Clodoaldo Neto Oct 29 '12 at 23:57
187
+50

With postgresql-9.3 one can do this;

SELECT g.id,
   array_remove(array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'Y' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END), NULL) canonical_users,
   array_remove(array_agg(CASE WHEN g.canonical = 'N' THEN g.users ELSE NULL END), NULL) non_canonical_users
FROM groups g 
GROUP BY g.id;

Update: with postgresql-9.4;

SELECT g.id,
   array_agg(g.users) FILTER (WHERE g.canonical = 'Y') canonical_users,
   array_agg(g.users) FILTER (WHERE g.canonical = 'N') non_canonical_users
FROM groups g 
GROUP BY g.id;
  • 3
    This works and is fast and elegant, it solved me a problem similar to the OP's. A reason to upgrading to 9.3 for those who didn't do it yet. +1 – Pavel V. Aug 29 '14 at 8:41
  • 8
    The 9.4 is even more elegant. Works like a charm – jmgarnier Sep 8 '15 at 13:41
  • 1
    The 9.4 variant is even better, because what I need to filter away in my case is the nulls. – coladict May 12 '17 at 12:01
  • I used the updated version first, but then realised I needed to remove Nulls and duplicates, so went back to the first suggestion. It's a large query, but it's to create a materialized view, so not a huge issue. – Relequestual Sep 12 '18 at 11:00
11

In solving the general question of removing nulls from array aggregates there are two main ways of attacking the problem: either doing array_agg(unnest(array_agg(x)) or creating a custom aggregate.

The first is of the form shown above:

SELECT 
    array_agg(u) 
FROM (
    SELECT 
        unnest(
            array_agg(v)
        ) as u 
    FROM 
        x
    ) un
WHERE 
    u IS NOT NULL;

The second:

/*
With reference to
http://ejrh.wordpress.com/2011/09/27/denormalisation-aggregate-function-for-postgresql/
*/
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION fn_array_agg_notnull (
    a anyarray
    , b anyelement
) RETURNS ANYARRAY
AS $$
BEGIN

    IF b IS NOT NULL THEN
        a := array_append(a, b);
    END IF;

    RETURN a;

END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

CREATE AGGREGATE array_agg_notnull(ANYELEMENT) (
    SFUNC = fn_array_agg_notnull,
    STYPE = ANYARRAY,
    INITCOND = '{}'
);

Calling the second is (naturally) a little nicer looking than the first:

select array_agg_notnull(v) from x;

7

I am adding this even though this this thread is quite old, but I ran into this neat trick that works quite well on small arrays. It runs on Postgres 8.4+ without additional libraries or functions.

string_to_array(array_to_string(array_agg(my_column)))::int[]

The array_to_string() method actually gets rid of the nulls.

3

As has been suggested in the comments you can write a function to replace nulls in an array, however as also pointed out in the thread linked to in the comments, this kind of defeats the efficiency of the aggregate function if you have to create an aggregate, split it then aggregate it again.

I think keeping nulls in the array is just a (perhaps unwanted) feature of Array_Agg. You could use subqueries to avoid this:

SELECT  COALESCE(y.ID, n.ID) ID,
        y.Users,
        n.Users
FROM    (   SELECT  g.ID, ARRAY_AGG(g.Users) AS Users
            FROM    Groups g
            WHERE   g.Canonical = 'Y'
            GROUP BY g.ID
        ) y
        FULL JOIN 
        (   SELECT  g.ID, ARRAY_AGG(g.Users) AS Users
            FROM    Groups g
            WHERE   g.Canonical = 'N'
            GROUP BY g.ID
        ) n
            ON n.ID = y.ID

SQL FIDDLE

  • Thanks. But I needed 'case' to handle rows within a given grouping, and subqueries would be inefficient there – Daud Oct 29 '12 at 15:15
-3

A bigger question is why pull all user/group combos at once. Guaranteed your UI cant handle all that data. Adding paging to oversized data is also a bad idea. Get your users to filter the set before they see data. Make sure your JOIN option set is in the list so they can filter for performance if they want to. Sometimes 2 queries make users happier if they are both fast.

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