8

Say I have two Template classes.

template<class T>
class baseclass1
{
    template<class> friend class baseclass2;
}

template<class D>
class baseclass2
{
     template<class T> void foo( D& x, T& y)
     {
          ...
     }
}

The Above code allows all types of baseclass1 to friend all types of baseclass2, a many-to-many relationship. I have two questions,

What is the syntax to allow baseclass1 to friend just the function

baseclass2<class D>::foo<class T>( D& x, T& y).  

And, what is the syntax to allow baseclass1 to friend just the function

baseclass2<class D>::foo<class T>( D& x, T& y) where T from baseclass1 matches The T from Function foo.

EDIT

To those who keep claiming you can't friend a template specialization. This code works

template<class cake>
class foo
{
    public:
        static void bar(cake x)
        {
            cout << x.x;
        }
};


class pie
{
    public:
        void set( int y){ x = y; }
    private:
        int x;

        friend void foo<pie>::bar(pie x);
};

class muffin
{
    public:
        void set( int y){ x = y; }
    private:
        int x;

    friend void foo<pie>::bar(pie x);
};

int main
{
        pie x;
        x.set(5);
        foo<pie>::bar(x);

        muffin y;
        y.set(5);
        //foo<muffin>::foo(y); //Causes a compilation Error because I only friended the pie specialization
}

Even notice where muffin friends the wrong foo, and still causes a compilation error. This works with both functions and classes. I am totally willing to accept that this isn't possible in my specific situation (It's actually looking more and more that way) I'd just like to understand why.

  • Do you need any baseclass2<D>::foo to be a friend, or is baseclass2<T> enough? – Kerrek SB Oct 30 '12 at 15:19
  • @Kerrek SB, the code in the example works well enough, The question is more academic than anything else, I was reading about and playing with the syntax for ever and could not for the life of me figure out how to restrict the friendship any further than the many-many shown above. – 8bitwide Oct 30 '12 at 15:32
  • 1
    Well, you can also have just a single friendship via friend void baseclass2<T>::template foo<T>(T & , T &);, or befriend all foos in the fixed class baseclass2<T> via template <typename U> friend void baseclass2<T>::template foo(T &, U &);. – Kerrek SB Oct 30 '12 at 15:43
  • @Kerrek: I think OP wants (for baseclass1<int>) baseclass2<bool>::foo<int>` to have access and baseclass2<bool>::foo<double> to not have access (the latter would have access to X<double>). Aka, the argument to baseclass2 should be irrelevant to the friend status. – Xeo Oct 30 '12 at 15:51
2

Befriending all possible specializations of baseclass2<D>::foo is rather easy:

template<class T> class baseclass1;

template<class D>
class baseclass2{
public:
  template<class T>
  void foo(D&, T&){ baseclass1<T> x; x.priv_foo(); }
};

template<class T>
class baseclass1{
  template<class D>
  template<class U>
  friend void baseclass2<D>::foo(D&, U&);

  void priv_foo(){}
};

template<class T>
class baseclass1{
  template<class D>
  template<class U>
  friend void baseclass2<D>::foo(D&, U&);
};

Live example.

A forward declaration of baseclass2 (so baseclass1 knows that baseclass2 exists and is a template) and two templates, one for the class, one for the function. It also looks like this for out-of-class definitions for function templates of class templates. :)

Befriending specifically baseclass2<D>::foo<T> is not possible, however, or I can't find the correct syntax for it.

A workaround might be some global function that forwards the access and together with the passkey pattern, but meh, it's a mess (imho):

template<class D> class baseclass2;

template<class D, class T>
void baseclass2_foo(baseclass2<D>& b, D&, T&);

template<class D, class T>
class baseclass2_foo_key{
  baseclass2_foo_key(){} // private ctor
  friend void baseclass2_foo<>(baseclass2<D>&, D&, T&);
};

template<class T>
class baseclass1{
public: // public access, but only baseclass2_foo can create the key
  template<class D>
  void priv_foo(baseclass2_foo_key<D, T> const&){}
};

template<class D, class T>
void baseclass2_foo(baseclass2<D>&, D&, T&){
  baseclass1<T> x;
  x.priv_foo(baseclass2_foo_key<D, T>());
}

template<class D>
class baseclass2{
public:
  template<class T>
  void foo(D& d, T& t){ baseclass2_foo(*this, d, t); }
};

Live example.

  • Your first example doesn't seem to work. Did you notice that one of the parameters from foo is from the class template and not the function template?? – 8bitwide Oct 30 '12 at 15:38
  • @8bitwide: Yes, I did, as you can see in the example link. Note that I edited the answer to make the class names match and completely rewrote the second part. Now, how does The first example not work? – Xeo Oct 30 '12 at 15:40
  • The compiler returns Error 4 error C2998: 'Unique-Type-foo foo' : cannot be a template definition – 8bitwide Oct 30 '12 at 15:40
  • @8bitwide: I'm currently investigating whether that's a bug with MSVC (and Clang, since that rejects it too) or with GCC (since that allows it). However, I can vouch that the second solution compiles perfectly fine on all three (MSVC, Clang, GCC). – Xeo Oct 30 '12 at 16:06
  • If you remove the forward declaration and swap the order of the Classes, your first example works in msvc – 8bitwide Oct 30 '12 at 16:29
0

AFAIK you may specify all instantiation of foo as friend but not an specific instantiation:

template< class T >
class C1 {
public:
    template< class Q > void foo( T& x, Q& y ) {
    }
};
template< class T >
class C2 {
    template< class Y > 
    template< class Q > friend void C1<Y>::foo( Y&, Q& );
};

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.