873

I have the following DataFrame (df):

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10, 5))

I add more column(s) by assignment:

df['mean'] = df.mean(1)

How can I move the column mean to the front, i.e. set it as first column leaving the order of the other columns untouched?

31 Answers 31

849

One easy way would be to reassign the dataframe with a list of the columns, rearranged as needed.

This is what you have now:

In [6]: df
Out[6]:
          0         1         2         3         4      mean
0  0.445598  0.173835  0.343415  0.682252  0.582616  0.445543
1  0.881592  0.696942  0.702232  0.696724  0.373551  0.670208
2  0.662527  0.955193  0.131016  0.609548  0.804694  0.632596
3  0.260919  0.783467  0.593433  0.033426  0.512019  0.436653
4  0.131842  0.799367  0.182828  0.683330  0.019485  0.363371
5  0.498784  0.873495  0.383811  0.699289  0.480447  0.587165
6  0.388771  0.395757  0.745237  0.628406  0.784473  0.588529
7  0.147986  0.459451  0.310961  0.706435  0.100914  0.345149
8  0.394947  0.863494  0.585030  0.565944  0.356561  0.553195
9  0.689260  0.865243  0.136481  0.386582  0.730399  0.561593

In [7]: cols = df.columns.tolist()

In [8]: cols
Out[8]: [0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 'mean']

Rearrange cols in any way you want. This is how I moved the last element to the first position:

In [12]: cols = cols[-1:] + cols[:-1]

In [13]: cols
Out[13]: ['mean', 0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L]

Then reorder the dataframe like this:

In [16]: df = df[cols]  #    OR    df = df.ix[:, cols]

In [17]: df
Out[17]:
       mean         0         1         2         3         4
0  0.445543  0.445598  0.173835  0.343415  0.682252  0.582616
1  0.670208  0.881592  0.696942  0.702232  0.696724  0.373551
2  0.632596  0.662527  0.955193  0.131016  0.609548  0.804694
3  0.436653  0.260919  0.783467  0.593433  0.033426  0.512019
4  0.363371  0.131842  0.799367  0.182828  0.683330  0.019485
5  0.587165  0.498784  0.873495  0.383811  0.699289  0.480447
6  0.588529  0.388771  0.395757  0.745237  0.628406  0.784473
7  0.345149  0.147986  0.459451  0.310961  0.706435  0.100914
8  0.553195  0.394947  0.863494  0.585030  0.565944  0.356561
9  0.561593  0.689260  0.865243  0.136481  0.386582  0.730399
| improve this answer | |
  • 17
    incase you get "cannot concatenate 'str' and 'list' objects" make sure you [] the str value in cols: cols = [cols[7]] + cols[:7] + cols[8:] – moeabdol Jan 9 '15 at 16:59
  • 3
    @FooBar That's not a set union it's a concatenation of two ordered lists. – Aman Oct 6 '16 at 22:08
  • 3
    @Aman I'm just pointing out that your code is deprecated. Your handling of your post is at your discretion. – FooBar Oct 7 '16 at 6:13
  • 2
    @FooBar, the type of cols is list; it even allows duplicates (which will be discarded when used on the dataframe). You are thinking of Index objects. – alexis Feb 28 '17 at 15:19
  • 8
    This implies copying ALL the data, which is highly inefficient. I wished pandas had a way to do that without creating a copy. – Konstantin Nov 27 '17 at 8:48
436

You could also do something like this:

df = df[['mean', '0', '1', '2', '3']]

You can get the list of columns with:

cols = list(df.columns.values)

The output will produce:

['0', '1', '2', '3', 'mean']

...which is then easy to rearrange manually before dropping it into the first function

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    You could also get the list of columns with list(df.columns) – Jim Oct 9 '15 at 22:14
  • 8
    or df.columns.tolist() – Jim Oct 9 '15 at 22:22
  • For newbies like me, re-arrange the list you get from cols. Then df=df[cols] i.e. the re-arranged list gets dropped into the first expression without only one set of brackets. – Sid Mar 20 '18 at 15:18
  • Column names will be integers in 3.x df = df[['mean1', 0, 1, 2, 3]] – prosti May 5 '19 at 1:10
  • 1
    I don't think this is a good answer as it does not provide code how to change column order of any dataframe. Say i import a csv file as pandas pd as pd.read_csv() . How can your answer be used to change the column order? – Robvh Jul 25 '19 at 8:22
312

Just assign the column names in the order you want them:

In [39]: df
Out[39]: 
          0         1         2         3         4  mean
0  0.172742  0.915661  0.043387  0.712833  0.190717     1
1  0.128186  0.424771  0.590779  0.771080  0.617472     1
2  0.125709  0.085894  0.989798  0.829491  0.155563     1
3  0.742578  0.104061  0.299708  0.616751  0.951802     1
4  0.721118  0.528156  0.421360  0.105886  0.322311     1
5  0.900878  0.082047  0.224656  0.195162  0.736652     1
6  0.897832  0.558108  0.318016  0.586563  0.507564     1
7  0.027178  0.375183  0.930248  0.921786  0.337060     1
8  0.763028  0.182905  0.931756  0.110675  0.423398     1
9  0.848996  0.310562  0.140873  0.304561  0.417808     1

In [40]: df = df[['mean', 4,3,2,1]]

Now, 'mean' column comes out in the front:

In [41]: df
Out[41]: 
   mean         4         3         2         1
0     1  0.190717  0.712833  0.043387  0.915661
1     1  0.617472  0.771080  0.590779  0.424771
2     1  0.155563  0.829491  0.989798  0.085894
3     1  0.951802  0.616751  0.299708  0.104061
4     1  0.322311  0.105886  0.421360  0.528156
5     1  0.736652  0.195162  0.224656  0.082047
6     1  0.507564  0.586563  0.318016  0.558108
7     1  0.337060  0.921786  0.930248  0.375183
8     1  0.423398  0.110675  0.931756  0.182905
9     1  0.417808  0.304561  0.140873  0.310562
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Does it make a copy? – user3226167 Jun 2 '17 at 2:02
  • 20
    @NicholasMorley - This isn't the best answer if you have, say, 1000 columns in your df. – AGS Jul 21 '17 at 20:19
  • 1
    it doesn't seem like you're assigning to <df>.columns like you claim initially – Bjorks number one fan Feb 19 '18 at 19:09
  • 8
    This is the best answer for a small number of columns. – Dongkyu Choi Apr 19 '18 at 23:12
  • 2
    This is just a copy of @freddygv 's earlier answer. That one should be the accepted answer, not this. – James Hirschorn May 4 '18 at 21:40
134

How about:

df.insert(0, 'mean', df.mean(1))

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/dsintro.html#column-selection-addition-deletion

| improve this answer | |
  • 35
    Could this be a future feature add to pandas? something like df.move(0,df.mean)? – jason May 27 '14 at 1:23
  • Oh man, it even works like this df_metadata.insert(0,'Db_name',"raw_data") (Code not relevant to this thread) – Aetos Jun 12 '18 at 9:10
  • 3
    Beautiful. And it happens in place, too. – cucu8 Aug 2 '18 at 10:29
  • 2
    This is a scalable solution since other solutions are manually typing column names. – CKM Aug 19 '19 at 17:00
  • This works for the OP's question, when creating a new column, but it doesn't for moving a column; attempt to move results in *** ValueError: cannot insert mean, already exists – spinup Feb 24 at 21:07
122

In your case,

df = df.reindex(columns=['mean',0,1,2,3,4])

will do exactly what you want.

In my case (general form):

df = df.reindex(columns=sorted(df.columns))
df = df.reindex(columns=(['opened'] + list([a for a in df.columns if a != 'opened']) ))
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I tried to set copy=False but it looks like reindex_axis still creates a copy. – Konstantin Nov 27 '17 at 9:10
  • 1
    @Konstantin can you create another question about this issue? It would be better to have more context – Alvaro Joao Nov 27 '17 at 14:11
56

You need to create a new list of your columns in the desired order, then use df = df[cols] to rearrange the columns in this new order.

cols = ['mean']  + [col for col in df if col != 'mean']
df = df[cols]

You can also use a more general approach. In this example, the last column (indicated by -1) is inserted as the first column.

cols = [df.columns[-1]] + [col for col in df if col != df.columns[-1]]
df = df[cols]

You can also use this approach for reordering columns in a desired order if they are present in the DataFrame.

inserted_cols = ['a', 'b', 'c']
cols = ([col for col in inserted_cols if col in df] 
        + [col for col in df if col not in inserted_cols])
df = df[cols]
| improve this answer | |
43

From August 2018:

If your column names are too long to type then you could specify the new order through a list of integers with the positions:

Data:

          0         1         2         3         4      mean
0  0.397312  0.361846  0.719802  0.575223  0.449205  0.500678
1  0.287256  0.522337  0.992154  0.584221  0.042739  0.485741
2  0.884812  0.464172  0.149296  0.167698  0.793634  0.491923
3  0.656891  0.500179  0.046006  0.862769  0.651065  0.543382
4  0.673702  0.223489  0.438760  0.468954  0.308509  0.422683
5  0.764020  0.093050  0.100932  0.572475  0.416471  0.389390
6  0.259181  0.248186  0.626101  0.556980  0.559413  0.449972
7  0.400591  0.075461  0.096072  0.308755  0.157078  0.207592
8  0.639745  0.368987  0.340573  0.997547  0.011892  0.471749
9  0.050582  0.714160  0.168839  0.899230  0.359690  0.438500

Generic example:

new_order = [3,2,1,4,5,0]
print(df[df.columns[new_order]])  

          3         2         1         4      mean         0
0  0.575223  0.719802  0.361846  0.449205  0.500678  0.397312
1  0.584221  0.992154  0.522337  0.042739  0.485741  0.287256
2  0.167698  0.149296  0.464172  0.793634  0.491923  0.884812
3  0.862769  0.046006  0.500179  0.651065  0.543382  0.656891
4  0.468954  0.438760  0.223489  0.308509  0.422683  0.673702
5  0.572475  0.100932  0.093050  0.416471  0.389390  0.764020
6  0.556980  0.626101  0.248186  0.559413  0.449972  0.259181
7  0.308755  0.096072  0.075461  0.157078  0.207592  0.400591
8  0.997547  0.340573  0.368987  0.011892  0.471749  0.639745
9  0.899230  0.168839  0.714160  0.359690  0.438500  0.050582

And for the specific case of OP's question:

new_order = [-1,0,1,2,3,4]
df = df[df.columns[new_order]]
print(df)

       mean         0         1         2         3         4
0  0.500678  0.397312  0.361846  0.719802  0.575223  0.449205
1  0.485741  0.287256  0.522337  0.992154  0.584221  0.042739
2  0.491923  0.884812  0.464172  0.149296  0.167698  0.793634
3  0.543382  0.656891  0.500179  0.046006  0.862769  0.651065
4  0.422683  0.673702  0.223489  0.438760  0.468954  0.308509
5  0.389390  0.764020  0.093050  0.100932  0.572475  0.416471
6  0.449972  0.259181  0.248186  0.626101  0.556980  0.559413
7  0.207592  0.400591  0.075461  0.096072  0.308755  0.157078
8  0.471749  0.639745  0.368987  0.340573  0.997547  0.011892
9  0.438500  0.050582  0.714160  0.168839  0.899230  0.359690

The main problem with this approach is that calling the same code multiple times will create different results each time, so one needs to be careful :)

| improve this answer | |
43
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame()
column_names = ['x','y','z','mean']
for col in column_names: 
    df[col] = np.random.randint(0,100, size=10000)

You can try out the following solutions :

Solution 1:

df = df[ ['mean'] + [ col for col in df.columns if col != 'mean' ] ]

Solution 2:


df = df[['mean', 'x', 'y', 'z']]

Solution 3:

col = df.pop("mean")
df = df.insert(0, col.name, col)

Solution 4:

df.set_index(df.columns[-1], inplace=True)
df.reset_index(inplace=True)

Solution 5:

cols = list(df)
cols = [cols[-1]] + cols[:-1]
df = df[cols]

solution 6:

order = [1,2,3,0] # setting column's order
df = df[[df.columns[i] for i in order]]

Time Comparison:

Solution 1:

CPU times: user 1.05 ms, sys: 35 µs, total: 1.08 ms Wall time: 995 µs

Solution 2:

CPU times: user 933 µs, sys: 0 ns, total: 933 µs Wall time: 800 µs

Solution 3:

CPU times: user 0 ns, sys: 1.35 ms, total: 1.35 ms Wall time: 1.08 ms

Solution 4:

CPU times: user 1.23 ms, sys: 45 µs, total: 1.27 ms Wall time: 986 µs

Solution 5:

CPU times: user 1.09 ms, sys: 19 µs, total: 1.11 ms Wall time: 949 µs

Solution 6:

CPU times: user 955 µs, sys: 34 µs, total: 989 µs Wall time: 859 µs

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Such a beautiful answer, thank you. – qasimalbaqali Mar 19 at 21:16
  • 1
    solution 1 is what I needed as I have too many columns(53), thanks – ratnesh Apr 1 at 13:15
  • @Pygirl wich value shows real comsumed time? (user, sys, total or wall time) – sergzemsk Apr 10 at 21:46
  • 1
    This is for me the best answer for the problem. So many solutions(including one that I needed) and simple approach. Thanks! – Gustavo Rottgering May 15 at 0:36
  • 1
    Solution 6 (no list comprehension): df = df.iloc[:, [1, 2, 3, 0]] – Dmitriy Work May 20 at 16:55
17

This function avoids you having to list out every variable in your dataset just to order a few of them.

def order(frame,var):
    if type(var) is str:
        var = [var] #let the command take a string or list
    varlist =[w for w in frame.columns if w not in var]
    frame = frame[var+varlist]
    return frame 

It takes two arguments, the first is the dataset, the second are the columns in the data set that you want to bring to the front.

So in my case I have a data set called Frame with variables A1, A2, B1, B2, Total and Date. If I want to bring Total to the front then all I have to do is:

frame = order(frame,['Total'])

If I want to bring Total and Date to the front then I do:

frame = order(frame,['Total','Date'])

EDIT:

Another useful way to use this is, if you have an unfamiliar table and you're looking with variables with a particular term in them, like VAR1, VAR2,... you may execute something like:

frame = order(frame,[v for v in frame.columns if "VAR" in v])
| improve this answer | |
17

I ran into a similar question myself, and just wanted to add what I settled on. I liked the reindex_axis() method for changing column order. This worked:

df = df.reindex_axis(['mean'] + list(df.columns[:-1]), axis=1)

An alternate method based on the comment from @Jorge:

df = df.reindex(columns=['mean'] + list(df.columns[:-1]))

Although reindex_axis seems to be slightly faster in micro benchmarks than reindex, I think I prefer the latter for its directness.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    This was a nice solution, but reindex_axis will be deprecated. I used reindex, and it worked just fine. – Jorge Aug 8 '18 at 21:32
15

Simply do,

df = df[['mean'] + df.columns[:-1].tolist()]
| improve this answer | |
  • TypeError: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly – parvij Jan 5 '16 at 11:10
  • could be API has changed, you can also do this... order = df.columns.tolist() df['mean'] = df.mean(1) df.columns = ['mean'] + order – Napitupulu Jon Jan 8 '16 at 10:28
  • 1
    A variation of this worked well for me. With an existing list, headers, that was used to create a dict that was then used to create the DataFrame, I called df.reindex(columns=headers). The only problem I ran into was I had already called df.set_index('some header name', inplace=True), so when the reindex was done, it added another column named some header name since the original column was now the index. As for the syntax specified above, ['mean'] + df.columns in the python interpreter gives me Index(u'meanAddress', u'meanCity', u'meanFirst Name'... – hlongmore Jun 20 '17 at 19:41
  • 1
    @hlongmore: I don't know your prior code is, but the edit should work (using 0.19.2) – Napitupulu Jon Jun 21 '17 at 0:56
  • The edit does indeed work (I'm on 0.20.2). In my case, I've already got the columns I want, so I think df.reindex() is what I really should use. – hlongmore Jun 22 '17 at 17:49
11

You could do the following (borrowing parts from Aman's answer):

cols = df.columns.tolist()
cols.insert(0, cols.pop(-1))

cols
>>>['mean', 0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L]

df = df[cols]
| improve this answer | |
10

Just type the column name you want to change, and set the index for the new location.

def change_column_order(df, col_name, index):
    cols = df.columns.tolist()
    cols.remove(col_name)
    cols.insert(index, col_name)
    return df[cols]

For your case, this would be like:

df = change_column_order(df, 'mean', 0)
| improve this answer | |
  • This is underrated – zelusp Jan 27 at 23:34
8

Moving any column to any position:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [1,2,3], 
                   "B": [2,4,8], 
                   "C": [5,5,5]})

cols = df.columns.tolist()
column_to_move = "C"
new_position = 1

cols.insert(new_position, cols.pop(cols.index(column_to_move)))
df = df[cols]
| improve this answer | |
7

I think this is a slightly neater solution:

df.insert(0,'mean', df.pop("mean"))

This solution is somewhat similar to @JoeHeffer 's solution but this is one liner.

Here we remove the column "mean" from the dataframe and attach it to index 0 with the same column name.

| improve this answer | |
5

Here's a way to move one existing column that will modify the existing data frame in place.

my_column = df.pop('column name')
df.insert(3, my_column.name, my_column)
| improve this answer | |
5

This question has been answered before but reindex_axis is deprecated now so I would suggest to use:

df.reindex(sorted(df.columns), axis=1)
| improve this answer | |
  • 19
    No, that's different. There the user wants to sort all columns by name. Here they want to move one column to the first column while leaving the order of the other columns untouched. – smci Apr 17 '13 at 13:06
  • 1
    What if you don't want them sorted? – Chankey Pathak Jun 8 '17 at 10:16
  • this returns a copy, does not work in-place – spinup Feb 24 at 21:15
3

How about using "T"?

df.T.reindex(['mean',0,1,2,3,4]).T
| improve this answer | |
3

@clocker: Your solution was very helpful for me, as I wanted to bring two columns in front from a dataframe where I do not know exactly the names of all columns, because they are generated from a pivot statement before. So, if you are in the same situation: To bring columns in front that you know the name of and then let them follow by "all the other columns", I came up with the following general solution;

df = df.reindex_axis(['Col1','Col2'] + list(df.columns.drop(['Col1','Col2'])), axis=1)
| improve this answer | |
3

set():

A simple approach is using set(), in particular when you have a long list of columns and do not want to handle them manually:

cols = list(set(df.columns.tolist()) - set(['mean']))
cols.insert(0, 'mean')
df = df[cols]
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    One caution: the order of columns goes away if you put it into set – pvarma Mar 6 '18 at 5:31
  • Interesting! @user1930402 I have tried the approach above on several occasions and never had any problem. I will double check again. – Shoresh Mar 6 '18 at 14:50
2

You can use reindex which can be used for both axis:

df
#           0         1         2         3         4      mean
# 0  0.943825  0.202490  0.071908  0.452985  0.678397  0.469921
# 1  0.745569  0.103029  0.268984  0.663710  0.037813  0.363821
# 2  0.693016  0.621525  0.031589  0.956703  0.118434  0.484254
# 3  0.284922  0.527293  0.791596  0.243768  0.629102  0.495336
# 4  0.354870  0.113014  0.326395  0.656415  0.172445  0.324628
# 5  0.815584  0.532382  0.195437  0.829670  0.019001  0.478415
# 6  0.944587  0.068690  0.811771  0.006846  0.698785  0.506136
# 7  0.595077  0.437571  0.023520  0.772187  0.862554  0.538182
# 8  0.700771  0.413958  0.097996  0.355228  0.656919  0.444974
# 9  0.263138  0.906283  0.121386  0.624336  0.859904  0.555009

df.reindex(['mean', *range(5)], axis=1)

#        mean         0         1         2         3         4
# 0  0.469921  0.943825  0.202490  0.071908  0.452985  0.678397
# 1  0.363821  0.745569  0.103029  0.268984  0.663710  0.037813
# 2  0.484254  0.693016  0.621525  0.031589  0.956703  0.118434
# 3  0.495336  0.284922  0.527293  0.791596  0.243768  0.629102
# 4  0.324628  0.354870  0.113014  0.326395  0.656415  0.172445
# 5  0.478415  0.815584  0.532382  0.195437  0.829670  0.019001
# 6  0.506136  0.944587  0.068690  0.811771  0.006846  0.698785
# 7  0.538182  0.595077  0.437571  0.023520  0.772187  0.862554
# 8  0.444974  0.700771  0.413958  0.097996  0.355228  0.656919
# 9  0.555009  0.263138  0.906283  0.121386  0.624336  0.859904
| improve this answer | |
2

Here is a function to do this for any number of columns.

def mean_first(df):
    ncols = df.shape[1]        # Get the number of columns
    index = list(range(ncols)) # Create an index to reorder the columns
    index.insert(0,ncols)      # This puts the last column at the front
    return(df.assign(mean=df.mean(1)).iloc[:,index]) # new df with last column (mean) first
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2

Hackiest method in the book

df.insert(0,"test",df["mean"])
df=df.drop(columns=["mean"]).rename(columns={"test":"mean"})
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2

I think this function is more straightforward. You Just need to specify a subset of columns at the start or the end or both:

def reorder_df_columns(df, start=None, end=None):
    """
        This function reorder columns of a DataFrame.
        It takes columns given in the list `start` and move them to the left.
        Its also takes columns in `end` and move them to the right.
    """
    if start is None:
        start = []
    if end is None:
        end = []
    assert isinstance(start, list) and isinstance(end, list)
    cols = list(df.columns)
    for c in start:
        if c not in cols:
            start.remove(c)
    for c in end:
        if c not in cols or c in start:
            end.remove(c)
    for c in start + end:
        cols.remove(c)
    cols = start + cols + end
    return df[cols]
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1

I believe @Aman's answer is the best if you know the location of the other column.

If you don't know the location of mean, but only have its name, you cannot resort directly to cols = cols[-1:] + cols[:-1]. Following is the next-best thing I could come up with:

meanDf = pd.DataFrame(df.pop('mean'))
# now df doesn't contain "mean" anymore. Order of join will move it to left or right:
meanDf.join(df) # has mean as first column
df.join(meanDf) # has mean as last column
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1

I liked Shoresh's answer to use set functionality to remove columns when you don't know the location, however this didn't work for my purpose as I need to keep the original column order (which has arbitrary column labels).

I got this to work though by using IndexedSet from the boltons package.

I also needed to re-add multiple column labels, so for a more general case I used the following code:

from boltons.setutils import IndexedSet
cols = list(IndexedSet(df.columns.tolist()) - set(['mean', 'std']))
cols[0:0] =['mean', 'std']
df = df[cols]

Hope this is useful to anyone searching this thread for a general solution.

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  • I am a bit surprised! I use set for this purpose quite often and never had to deal with ordering. – Shoresh Oct 2 '19 at 22:09
0

Most of the answers did not generalize enough and pandas reindex_axis method is a little tedious, hence I offer a simple function to move an arbitrary number of columns to any position using a dictionary where key = column name and value = position to move to. If your dataframe is large pass True to 'big_data' then the function will return the ordered columns list. And you could use this list to slice your data.

def order_column(df, columns, big_data = False):

    """Re-Orders dataFrame column(s)
       Parameters : 
       df      -- dataframe
       columns -- a dictionary:
                  key   = current column position/index or column name
                  value = position to move it to  
       big_data -- boolean 
                  True = returns only the ordered columns as a list
                          the user user can then slice the data using this
                          ordered column
                  False = default - return a copy of the dataframe
    """
    ordered_col = df.columns.tolist()

    for key, value in columns.items():

        ordered_col.remove(key)
        ordered_col.insert(value, key)

    if big_data:

        return ordered_col

    return df[ordered_col]

# e.g.
df = pd.DataFrame({'chicken wings': np.random.rand(10, 1).flatten(), 'taco': np.random.rand(10,1).flatten(),
                          'coffee': np.random.rand(10, 1).flatten()})
df['mean'] = df.mean(1)

df = order_column(df, {'mean': 0, 'coffee':1 })

>>>

output

col = order_column(df, {'mean': 0, 'coffee':1 }, True)

col
>>>
['mean', 'coffee', 'chicken wings', 'taco']

# you could grab it by doing this

df = df[col]

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0

I have a very specific use case for re-ordering column names in pandas. Sometimes I am creating a new column in a dataframe that is based on an existing column. By default pandas will insert my new column at the end, but I want the new column to be inserted next to the existing column it's derived from.

enter image description here

def rearrange_list(input_list, input_item_to_move, input_item_insert_here):
    '''
    Helper function to re-arrange the order of items in a list.
    Useful for moving column in pandas dataframe.

    Inputs:
        input_list - list
        input_item_to_move - item in list to move
        input_item_insert_here - item in list, insert before 

    returns:
        output_list
    '''
    # make copy for output, make sure it's a list
    output_list = list(input_list)

    # index of item to move
    idx_move = output_list.index(input_item_to_move)

    # pop off the item to move
    itm_move = output_list.pop(idx_move)

    # index of item to insert here
    idx_insert = output_list.index(input_item_insert_here)

    # insert item to move into here
    output_list.insert(idx_insert, itm_move)

    return output_list


import pandas as pd

# step 1: create sample dataframe
df = pd.DataFrame({
    'motorcycle': ['motorcycle1', 'motorcycle2', 'motorcycle3'],
    'initial_odometer': [101, 500, 322],
    'final_odometer': [201, 515, 463],
    'other_col_1': ['blah', 'blah', 'blah'],
    'other_col_2': ['blah', 'blah', 'blah']
})
print('Step 1: create sample dataframe')
display(df)
print()

# step 2: add new column that is difference between final and initial
df['change_odometer'] = df['final_odometer']-df['initial_odometer']
print('Step 2: add new column')
display(df)
print()

# step 3: rearrange columns
ls_cols = df.columns
ls_cols = rearrange_list(ls_cols, 'change_odometer', 'final_odometer')
df=df[ls_cols]
print('Step 3: rearrange columns')
display(df)
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0

Just flipping helps often.

df[df.columns[::-1]]

Or just shuffle for a look.

import random
cols = list(df.columns)
random.shuffle(cols)
df[cols]
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0

A pretty straightforward solution that worked for me is to use .reindex on df.columns:

df=df[df.columns.reindex(['mean',0,1,2,3,4])[0]]
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