I have the following DataFrame (df):

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10, 5))

I add more column(s) by assignment:

df['mean'] = df.mean(1)

How can I move the column mean to the front, i.e. set it as first column leaving the order of the other columns untouched?

25 Answers 25

One easy way would be to reassign the dataframe with a list of the columns, rearranged as needed.

This is what you have now:

In [6]: df
Out[6]:
          0         1         2         3         4      mean
0  0.445598  0.173835  0.343415  0.682252  0.582616  0.445543
1  0.881592  0.696942  0.702232  0.696724  0.373551  0.670208
2  0.662527  0.955193  0.131016  0.609548  0.804694  0.632596
3  0.260919  0.783467  0.593433  0.033426  0.512019  0.436653
4  0.131842  0.799367  0.182828  0.683330  0.019485  0.363371
5  0.498784  0.873495  0.383811  0.699289  0.480447  0.587165
6  0.388771  0.395757  0.745237  0.628406  0.784473  0.588529
7  0.147986  0.459451  0.310961  0.706435  0.100914  0.345149
8  0.394947  0.863494  0.585030  0.565944  0.356561  0.553195
9  0.689260  0.865243  0.136481  0.386582  0.730399  0.561593

In [7]: cols = df.columns.tolist()

In [8]: cols
Out[8]: [0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 'mean']

Rearrange cols in any way you want. This is how I moved the last element to the first position:

In [12]: cols = cols[-1:] + cols[:-1]

In [13]: cols
Out[13]: ['mean', 0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L]

Then reorder the dataframe like this:

In [16]: df = df[cols]  #    OR    df = df.ix[:, cols]

In [17]: df
Out[17]:
       mean         0         1         2         3         4
0  0.445543  0.445598  0.173835  0.343415  0.682252  0.582616
1  0.670208  0.881592  0.696942  0.702232  0.696724  0.373551
2  0.632596  0.662527  0.955193  0.131016  0.609548  0.804694
3  0.436653  0.260919  0.783467  0.593433  0.033426  0.512019
4  0.363371  0.131842  0.799367  0.182828  0.683330  0.019485
5  0.587165  0.498784  0.873495  0.383811  0.699289  0.480447
6  0.588529  0.388771  0.395757  0.745237  0.628406  0.784473
7  0.345149  0.147986  0.459451  0.310961  0.706435  0.100914
8  0.553195  0.394947  0.863494  0.585030  0.565944  0.356561
9  0.561593  0.689260  0.865243  0.136481  0.386582  0.730399
  • 10
    incase you get "cannot concatenate 'str' and 'list' objects" make sure you [] the str value in cols: cols = [cols[7]] + cols[:7] + cols[8:] – moeabdol Jan 9 '15 at 16:59
  • 2
    @FooBar That's not a set union it's a concatenation of two ordered lists. – Aman Oct 6 '16 at 22:08
  • 2
    @Aman I'm just pointing out that your code is deprecated. Your handling of your post is at your discretion. – FooBar Oct 7 '16 at 6:13
  • 2
    @FooBar, the type of cols is list; it even allows duplicates (which will be discarded when used on the dataframe). You are thinking of Index objects. – alexis Feb 28 '17 at 15:19
  • 2
    This implies copying ALL the data, which is highly inefficient. I wished pandas had a way to do that without creating a copy. – Konstantin Nov 27 '17 at 8:48

You could also do something like this:

df = df[['mean', '0', '1', '2', '3']]

You can get the list of columns with:

cols = list(df.columns.values)

The output will produce:

['0', '1', '2', '3', 'mean']

...which is then easy to rearrange manually before dropping it into the first function

  • 1
    You could also get the list of columns with list(df.columns) – Jim Oct 9 '15 at 22:14
  • 4
    or df.columns.tolist() – Jim Oct 9 '15 at 22:22
  • 3
    Three years later, this question still comes up first on google and freddygv's answer should be accepted as correct. – rioted Mar 2 at 18:25
  • For newbies like me, re-arrange the list you get from cols. Then df=df[cols] i.e. the re-arranged list gets dropped into the first expression without only one set of brackets. – Sid Mar 20 at 15:18

Just assign the column names in the order you want them:

In [39]: df
Out[39]: 
          0         1         2         3         4  mean
0  0.172742  0.915661  0.043387  0.712833  0.190717     1
1  0.128186  0.424771  0.590779  0.771080  0.617472     1
2  0.125709  0.085894  0.989798  0.829491  0.155563     1
3  0.742578  0.104061  0.299708  0.616751  0.951802     1
4  0.721118  0.528156  0.421360  0.105886  0.322311     1
5  0.900878  0.082047  0.224656  0.195162  0.736652     1
6  0.897832  0.558108  0.318016  0.586563  0.507564     1
7  0.027178  0.375183  0.930248  0.921786  0.337060     1
8  0.763028  0.182905  0.931756  0.110675  0.423398     1
9  0.848996  0.310562  0.140873  0.304561  0.417808     1

In [40]: df = df[['mean', 4,3,2,1]]

Now, 'mean' column comes out in the front:

In [41]: df
Out[41]: 
   mean         4         3         2         1
0     1  0.190717  0.712833  0.043387  0.915661
1     1  0.617472  0.771080  0.590779  0.424771
2     1  0.155563  0.829491  0.989798  0.085894
3     1  0.951802  0.616751  0.299708  0.104061
4     1  0.322311  0.105886  0.421360  0.528156
5     1  0.736652  0.195162  0.224656  0.082047
6     1  0.507564  0.586563  0.318016  0.558108
7     1  0.337060  0.921786  0.930248  0.375183
8     1  0.423398  0.110675  0.931756  0.182905
9     1  0.417808  0.304561  0.140873  0.310562
  • 15
    This should be the accepted answer. – Nicholas Morley Apr 13 '17 at 12:09
  • 1
    Does it make a copy? – user3226167 Jun 2 '17 at 2:02
  • 9
    @NicholasMorley - This isn't the best answer if you have, say, 1000 columns in your df. – AGS Jul 21 '17 at 20:19
  • 1
    it doesn't seem like you're assigning to <df>.columns like you claim initially – Mike Palmice Feb 19 at 19:09
  • This is the best answer for a small number of columns. – Dongkyu Choi Apr 19 at 23:12

How about:

df.insert(0, 'mean', df.mean(1))

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/dsintro.html#column-selection-addition-deletion

  • 18
    Could this be a future feature add to pandas? something like df.move(0,df.mean)? – jason May 27 '14 at 1:23
  • Oh man, it even works like this df_metadata.insert(0,'Db_name',"raw_data") (Code not relevant to this thread) – Aetos Jun 12 at 9:10
  • Beautiful. And it happens in place, too. – cucu8 Aug 2 at 10:29

In your case,

df = df.reindex_axis(['mean',0,1,2,3,4], axis=1)

will do exactly what you want.

In my case (general form):

df = df.reindex_axis(sorted(df.columns), axis=1)
df = df.reindex_axis(['opened'] + list([a for a in df.columns if a != 'opened']), axis=1)

update Jan 2018

If you want to use reindex:

df = df.reindex(columns=sorted(df.columns))
df = df.reindex(columns=(['opened'] + list([a for a in df.columns if a != 'opened']) ))
  • I tried to set copy=False but it looks like reindex_axis still creates a copy. – Konstantin Nov 27 '17 at 9:10
  • 1
    @Konstantin can you create another question about this issue? It would be better to have more context – Alvaro Joao Nov 27 '17 at 14:11
  • 1
    As reindex_axis is deprecated, use reindex instead – DucCuong Dec 28 '17 at 14:26

You need to create a new list of your columns in the desired order, then use df = df[cols] to rearrange the columns in this new order.

cols = ['mean']  + [col for col in df if col != 'mean']
df = df[cols]

You can also use a more general approach. In this example, the last column (indicated by -1) is inserted as the first column.

cols = [df.columns[-1]] + [col for col in df if col != df.columns[-1]]
df = df[cols]

You can also use this approach for reordering columns in a desired order if they are present in the DataFrame.

inserted_cols = ['a', 'b', 'c']
cols = ([col for col in inserted_cols if col in df] 
        + [col for col in df if col not in inserted cols])
df = df[cols]

Simply do,

df = df[['mean'] + df.columns[:-1].tolist()]
  • TypeError: Can't convert 'int' object to str implicitly – parvij Jan 5 '16 at 11:10
  • could be API has changed, you can also do this... order = df.columns.tolist() df['mean'] = df.mean(1) df.columns = ['mean'] + order – Napitupulu Jon Jan 8 '16 at 10:28
  • A variation of this worked well for me. With an existing list, headers, that was used to create a dict that was then used to create the DataFrame, I called df.reindex(columns=headers). The only problem I ran into was I had already called df.set_index('some header name', inplace=True), so when the reindex was done, it added another column named some header name since the original column was now the index. As for the syntax specified above, ['mean'] + df.columns in the python interpreter gives me Index(u'meanAddress', u'meanCity', u'meanFirst Name'... – hlongmore Jun 20 '17 at 19:41
  • 1
    @hlongmore: I don't know your prior code is, but the edit should work (using 0.19.2) – Napitupulu Jon Jun 21 '17 at 0:56
  • The edit does indeed work (I'm on 0.20.2). In my case, I've already got the columns I want, so I think df.reindex() is what I really should use. – hlongmore Jun 22 '17 at 17:49

This function avoids you having to list out every variable in your dataset just to order a few of them.

def order(frame,var):
    if type(var) is str:
        var = [var] #let the command take a string or list
    varlist =[w for w in frame.columns if w not in var]
    frame = frame[var+varlist]
    return frame 

It takes two arguments, the first is the dataset, the second are the columns in the data set that you want to bring to the front.

So in my case I have a data set called Frame with variables A1, A2, B1, B2, Total and Date. If I want to bring Total to the front then all I have to do is:

frame = order(frame,['Total'])

If I want to bring Total and Date to the front then I do:

frame = order(frame,['Total','Date'])

EDIT:

Another useful way to use this is, if you have an unfamiliar table and you're looking with variables with a particular term in them, like VAR1, VAR2,... you may execute something like:

frame = order(frame,[v for v in frame.columns if "VAR" in v])

I ran into a similar question myself, and just wanted to add what I settled on. I liked the reindex_axis() method for changing column order. This worked:

df = df.reindex_axis(['mean'] + list(df.columns[:-1]), axis=1)

An alternate method based on the comment from @Jorge:

df = df.reindex(columns=['mean'] + list(df.columns[:-1]))

Although reindex_axis seems to be slightly faster in micro benchmarks than reindex, I think I prefer the latter for its directness.

  • 2
    This was a nice solution, but reindex_axis will be deprecated. I used reindex, and it worked just fine. – Jorge Aug 8 at 21:32

You could do the following (borrowing parts from Aman's answer):

cols = df.columns.tolist()
cols.insert(0, cols.pop(-1))

cols
>>>['mean', 0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L]

df = df[cols]

Just type the column name you want to change, and set the index for the new location.

def change_column_order(df, col_name, index):
    cols = df.columns.tolist()
    cols.remove(col_name)
    cols.insert(index, col_name)
    return df[cols]

For your case, this would be like:

df = change_column_order(df, 'mean', 0)
  • great generic and effective solution, thank you! – Dennis Golomazov Jan 5 at 23:26

The simplest way would be to change the order of the column names like this

df = df[['mean', Col1,Col2,Col3]]

Moving any column to any position:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [1,2,3], 
                   "B": [2,4,8], 
                   "C": [5,5,5]})

cols = df.columns.tolist()
column_to_move = "C"
new_position = 1

cols.insert(new_position, cols.pop(cols.index(column_to_move)))
df = df[cols]

This question has been answered before:

df.reindex_axis(sorted(df.columns), axis=1)
  • 12
    No, that's different. There the user wants to sort all columns by name. Here they want to move one column to the first column while leaving the order of the other columns untouched. – smci Apr 17 '13 at 13:06
  • What if you don't want them sorted? – Chankey Pathak Jun 8 '17 at 10:16

How about using "T"?

df.T.reindex(['mean',0,1,2,3,4]).T

I tried the insert() function as suggested by Wes McKinney.

df.insert(0, 'mean', df.mean(1))

This got the result that Timmie wanted, in one line, without the need to move that last column.

set():

A simple approach is using set(), in particular when you have a long list of columns and do not want to handle them manually:

cols = list(set(df.columns.tolist()) - set(['mean']))
cols.insert(0, 'mean')
df = df[cols]
  • One caution: the order of columns goes away if you put it into set – user1930402 Mar 6 at 5:31
  • Interesting! @user1930402 I have tried the approach above on several occasions and never had any problem. I will double check again. – Shoresh Mar 6 at 14:50

@clocker: Your solution was very helpful for me, as I wanted to bring two columns in front from a dataframe where I do not know exactly the names of all columns, because they are generated from a pivot statement before. So, if you are in the same situation: To bring columns in front that you know the name of and then let them follow by "all the other columns", I came up with the following general solution;

df = df.reindex_axis(['Col1','Col2'] + list(df.columns.drop(['Col1','Col2'])), axis=1)

You can use reindex which can be used for both axis:

df
#           0         1         2         3         4      mean
# 0  0.943825  0.202490  0.071908  0.452985  0.678397  0.469921
# 1  0.745569  0.103029  0.268984  0.663710  0.037813  0.363821
# 2  0.693016  0.621525  0.031589  0.956703  0.118434  0.484254
# 3  0.284922  0.527293  0.791596  0.243768  0.629102  0.495336
# 4  0.354870  0.113014  0.326395  0.656415  0.172445  0.324628
# 5  0.815584  0.532382  0.195437  0.829670  0.019001  0.478415
# 6  0.944587  0.068690  0.811771  0.006846  0.698785  0.506136
# 7  0.595077  0.437571  0.023520  0.772187  0.862554  0.538182
# 8  0.700771  0.413958  0.097996  0.355228  0.656919  0.444974
# 9  0.263138  0.906283  0.121386  0.624336  0.859904  0.555009

df.reindex(['mean', *range(5)], axis=1)

#        mean         0         1         2         3         4
# 0  0.469921  0.943825  0.202490  0.071908  0.452985  0.678397
# 1  0.363821  0.745569  0.103029  0.268984  0.663710  0.037813
# 2  0.484254  0.693016  0.621525  0.031589  0.956703  0.118434
# 3  0.495336  0.284922  0.527293  0.791596  0.243768  0.629102
# 4  0.324628  0.354870  0.113014  0.326395  0.656415  0.172445
# 5  0.478415  0.815584  0.532382  0.195437  0.829670  0.019001
# 6  0.506136  0.944587  0.068690  0.811771  0.006846  0.698785
# 7  0.538182  0.595077  0.437571  0.023520  0.772187  0.862554
# 8  0.444974  0.700771  0.413958  0.097996  0.355228  0.656919
# 9  0.555009  0.263138  0.906283  0.121386  0.624336  0.859904

Here's a way to move one existing column that will modify the existing data frame in place.

my_column = df.pop('column name')
df.insert(3, my_column.name, my_column)

Here is a function to do this for any number of columns.

def mean_first(df):
    ncols = df.shape[1]        # Get the number of columns
    index = list(range(ncols)) # Create an index to reorder the columns
    index.insert(0,ncols)      # This puts the last column at the front
    return(df.assign(mean=df.mean(1)).iloc[:,index]) # new df with last column (mean) first

I believe @Aman's answer is the best if you know the location of the other column.

If you don't know the location of mean, but only have its name, you cannot resort directly to cols = cols[-1:] + cols[:-1]. Following is the next-best thing I could come up with:

meanDf = pd.DataFrame(df.pop('mean'))
# now df doesn't contain "mean" anymore. Order of join will move it to left or right:
meanDf.join(df) # has mean as first column
df.join(meanDf) # has mean as last column

DataFrame.sort_index(axis=1) is quite clean.Check doc here. And then concat

I liked Shoresh's answer to use set functionality to remove columns when you don't know the location, however this didn't work for my purpose as I need to keep the original column order (which has arbitrary column labels).

I got this to work though by using IndexedSet from the boltons package.

I also needed to re-add multiple column labels, so for a more general case I used the following code:

from boltons.setutils import IndexedSet
cols = list(IndexedSet(df.columns.tolist()) - set(['mean', 'std']))
cols[0:0] =['mean', 'std']
df = df[cols]

Hope this is useful to anyone searching this thread for a general solution.

From August 2018:

A more flexible approach if you don't have too many columns and non integer column names that are too long to type explicitly, would be to specify the full order through a list

new_order = [3,2,1,4,5,0]
df = df[df.columns[new_order]]
print(df)  

        a         c         b      mean         d         e
0  0.637589  0.634264  0.733961  0.617316  0.534911  0.545856
1  0.854449  0.830046  0.883416  0.678389  0.183003  0.641032
2  0.332996  0.195891  0.879472  0.545261  0.447813  0.870135
3  0.902704  0.843252  0.348227  0.677614  0.635780  0.658107
4  0.422357  0.529151  0.619282  0.412559  0.405749  0.086255
5  0.251454  0.940245  0.068633  0.554269  0.691631  0.819380
6  0.423781  0.179961  0.643971  0.361245  0.105050  0.453460
7  0.680696  0.487651  0.255453  0.419046  0.330417  0.341014
8  0.276729  0.473765  0.981271  0.690007  0.817877  0.900394
9  0.964470  0.248088  0.609391  0.463661  0.128077  0.368279

And for the specific case of OP's question:

new_order = [-1,0,1,2,3,4]
df = df[df.columns[new_order]]
print(df)

      mean         a         b         c         d         e
0  0.595177  0.329206  0.713246  0.712898  0.572263  0.648273
1  0.638860  0.452519  0.598171  0.797982  0.858137  0.487490
2  0.287636  0.100442  0.244445  0.288450  0.285795  0.519049
3  0.653974  0.863342  0.460811  0.782644  0.827890  0.335183
4  0.285233  0.004613  0.485135  0.014066  0.489957  0.432394
5  0.430761  0.630070  0.328865  0.528100  0.031827  0.634943
6  0.444338  0.102679  0.808613  0.389616  0.440022  0.480759
7  0.536163  0.063105  0.420832  0.959125  0.643879  0.593874
8  0.556107  0.716114  0.180603  0.668684  0.262900  0.952237
9  0.416280  0.816816  0.064956  0.178113  0.377693  0.643820

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