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I understand if two IP addresses are AND'd with a subnet mask if the result is the same then they are on the same network. If the result is different then they are on different networks. My question is, when given an IP address omitting some 0s where do the extra 0s get placed?

For example if the subnet mask is 255 . 128 . 0 . 0 , and you have IP 126 . 1 . 0 . 10 and IP 126 . 127 . 0 . 1 if you just blindly AND the IPs with the subnet mask you get different results even though they are on the same network.

Does 126.1.0.10 become 126.100.000.100 or 126.001.000.100?

EDIT after reading replies:

255128000000 AND 126001000010 = 1085496376*32* but 255128000000 AND 126127000001 = 1085276323*84*
Am I missing something?

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    You shouldn't be getting different results after ANDing those addresses with the given subnet mask. What results are you getting? It would be best if you would show some code. – Greg Hewgill Oct 30 '12 at 22:53
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IPv4 addreses are written as four ordinary decimal numbers (each fitting into a byte) separated by dots.

The ordinary decimal number 1 is "one", which can also be written 001. However 100 is a different number, namely "a hundred".


The AND operation is always a bitwise AND, so to understand it you must first see how the dotted-decimal address and netmask corresponds to a raw binary 32-bit address:

        126   .    127   .     0    .    1
     01111110   01111111   00000000   00000001

        255   .    128   .     0    .    0
AND  11111111   10000000   00000000   00000000
 -----------------------------------------------
     01111110   00000000   00000000   00000000
        126   .      0   .     0    .    0

So 126.127.0.1 with netmask 255.128.0.0 is in subnet 126.0.0.0/9

In software one usually stores IPv4 addresses in a single 32-bit variable -- so 126.127.0.1 is 01111110011111110000000000000001 binary (which also encodes 2122252289 decimal, except that nobody ever cares what the decimal value of a 32-bit IP address is), and it is converted to dotted-decimal only when it needs to be shown to human users. This representation is what glglgl decribes as multiplying by 256 several times.

If you also have the netmask in a 32-bit variable (11111111100000000000000000000000 binary or 4286578688 decimal), you can AND them in a single machine instruction to get the network address 01111110000000000000000000000000.

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You are completely missing something: You don't just concat your digits together, because AND works on binary level.

So either you process the IPv4 addresses byte-wise, or you transform them into a decimal number, but not with factor 1000, but with factor 256.

This is to say, instead of doing

((126 * 1000 + 1) * 1000 + 0) * 1000 + 10 = 126001000010

you should do

((126 * 256 + 1) * 256 + 0) * 256 + 10 = 2113994762

. If you apply this to the other numbers, you should succeed.

Alternatively, you could AND together the 4 numbers separately, so

255 & 126 = 126 (in both cases), 128 & (1 resp. 127) = 0, 0 & (anything) = 0, 0 & (anything) = 0.

So you get 126.0.0.0 for both, making them belong to the same subnet.

  • I don't understand the first method. So you convert both IPs and subnet mask using this method and then do what? – Celeritas Oct 31 '12 at 5:53
  • @Celeritas: bitwise-and the results. See my expanded answer. – Henning Makholm Oct 31 '12 at 9:35
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Despite the fact that it's a rather odd question, I'll try answering your specific query:

The number '1' in that second octet is really a number 1, and therefore it's '001', not '100'.

That said, your example should have worked, so I suspect there's something wrong with your implementation. You should not need to worry about padding or anything. These are numbers, and bitwise-AND should "just work".

You might want to provide more detail about what is going wrong.

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