Below is a subset of the kind of table structure and data i'm working with.

CREATE TABLE #Test
(
     Val varchar(5)
    ,Type varchar(5)
)

INSERT #Test VALUES ('Yes','Text')
INSERT #Test VALUES ('10','Int')
INSERT #Test VALUES ('10.00','Float')
INSERT #Test VALUES ('9.00','Float')
INSERT #Test VALUES ('9','Int')

I want to write a query that will let me know if the column 'Val' is <= 9.00 (must be of numeric data type). I did this by doing the following:

SELECT *
FROM
    (
        SELECT Val
        FROM #Test
        WHERE Type = 'Int'
    ) IntsOnly
WHERE IntsOnly.Val <= 9.00

This gives me an arithmetic overflow error. However, if I exclude the row of data with the value '10':

SELECT *
FROM
    (
        SELECT Val
        FROM #Test
        WHERE Type = 'Int'
        AND Val <> '10'
    ) IntsOnly
WHERE IntsOnly.Val <= 9.00

It works without any issue. My question is not how to fix this as I know I can simply convert the data to the format I require.

My question is why the value of '10' in the column 'Val' is returning an error. Surely the logic should just return 'False' and simply exclude the rows because '10' (which I assume is implicitly converted) is greater than 9.00.

Thanks.

  • 1
    Arithmetic overflow error, you sure? Not a conversion error? – GSerg Oct 31 '12 at 15:25
  • Try being explicit in the conversion. What does CAST(val AS DECIMAL(9,2)) <= CAST(9.00 AS DECIMAL(9,2)) give? – MatBailie Oct 31 '12 at 15:26
  • GSerg - Yep, arithmetic overflow converting the varchar to numeric. Dems - That does do the trick! However, I'd like to understand why the implicit conversion does not work? My thought was that it could do that conversion and should not cause an issue? – JBond Oct 31 '12 at 15:28
  • 6
    This is not a safe way of doing this query anyway. See SQL Server should not raise illogical errors. The cast can still get pushed down and happen against the value Yes despite the use of the sub query. – Martin Smith Oct 31 '12 at 15:34
up vote 11 down vote accepted

This generates an Arithmetic Overflow because it is trying to implicitly cast the Val column to a NUMERIC(3,2), which naturally will overflow on a 2-digit value like 10.

It's using NUMERIC(3,2) as the target type and size because that is the smallest numeric that 9.00 appears to fit into.

The solution, of course, is to use explict CASTing instead of doing it implicitly

  • 1
    Also what I have noticed is that lets say you have a Decimal (5,3) and the number you have is 12.321 that will be accepted. But if your number is 123.321 <- that is 6 digits in total so wont accept it. Your decimal should then be Decimal (6,3). That is just something I have tested and confirmed myself SQL 2014 – Pierre Jul 22 '14 at 6:20
  • 2
    @Pierre Yes, that's literally just the definition of the DECIMAL datatype specification. – RBarryYoung Jul 22 '14 at 6:22

From BOL:

In Transact-SQL statements, a constant with a decimal point is automatically converted into a numeric data value, using the minimum precision and scale necessary. For example, the constant 12.345 is converted into a numeric value with a precision of 5 and a scale of 3.

That means your constant 9.00 will have a precision of 1 and a scale of 0 a precision of 3 and a scale of 2, so it cannot store the value 10, which needs a minimum precision of 2 + scale.

You'll need to wrap the IntsOnly.Val with either a CAST or CONVERT to specify the correct precision and scale.

  • 1
    I'm sure you meant to write scale of 2? – Martin Smith Oct 31 '12 at 15:39
  • It depends how clever the SQL engine is; it could either convert to a numeric(3, 2) because there are two digits after the decimal point, or it could convert to a numeric(1, 0) because the digits after the decimal point are both 0. – Richard Deeming Oct 31 '12 at 15:41
  • It looks at all zeros to the right of the decimal point but does ignore all leading zeros to the left. So 00000.0000 gives numeric(4,4) – Martin Smith Oct 31 '12 at 15:42
  • Thanks, I've updated the answer. – Richard Deeming Oct 31 '12 at 15:48

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