1

It is true in .NET that all types inherit from System.Object.

What I find paradoxical, is a few methods on System.Object - namely

  • public virtual string ToString();
  • public virtual bool Equals(object objA, object objB);

System.String is inherited from System.Object:

[Serializable]
public class String : Object { /*...*/ }

System.Boolean is inherited from System.Object:

[Serializable]
public struct Boolean : Object { /*....*/ }

What is the going on under the covers that allowed the System.Object class to allow sub-classes to be used as return types on its methods? How did this code ever compiled, as there seems to be a circular references. String <-> Object <-> Boolean.

I'm sure I will see statements, on "thats how it is implemented", but I can understand if these return types were "System.Object"'s themselves, and then a sub-class used the implemenations of string, bool and other System.ValueTypes to declare a new base class.

I hope that makes sense.

Thanks in advance,

Dominic

7

It's no big deal, a base class can always reference subclasses. For instance, this code is perfectly legal :

class A
{
    public B CreateB();
    {
        return new B();
    }
}

class B : A
{
}

Note that it would be an issue if A and B were defined in separate assemblies, because that would require a circular assembly reference, which is not allowed

  • You may want to take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/1316518/… where it is demonstrated that while circular dependencies are blocked by the IDE, they can be done using the command-line compiler (csc.exe). – Alfred Myers Aug 22 '09 at 18:09
  • I mean circular dependencies between assemblies... – Alfred Myers Aug 22 '09 at 18:11
2

A circular reference is only an issue across multiple projects, otherwise parent/child relationship wouldn't ever exist on both sides either.

2

Actually, it is not entirely true that all types inherit from Object. Please see Eric Lippert's blog entry on this.

0

I dont see the problem of a base-class returning a derived class.

Moreover I dont see circular dependencies since Object.ToString(); returns a String object. The String class derives from object, but so what? If both are in the same assembly, there is no problem.

  • It was more a chicken/egg situation, that's what confused me? – Dominic Zukiewicz Sep 22 '09 at 8:52
0

In addition to what others have said you can also derive a class from a base class that uses the deriving class as a generic type parameter. There are a lot of neat uses for this pattern.

public class A<T>
{
}

public class B : A<B>
{
}
0

If you want to see a circular dependency in the .NET framework, then look no further than System.dll, System.Xml.dll and System.Configuration.dll:

How Microsoft created these assemblies is a mystery to me. Actually, I might post this as another question...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.