76

I have a variety of arrays that will either contain

story & message

or just

story

How would I check to see if an array contains both story and message? array_key_exists() only looks for that single key in the array.

Is there a way to do this?

  • 2
    If "story" will be there in either case, it sounds like you really just need to check for "message". – Wyzard Nov 1 '12 at 1:03
  • 4
    Using array_intersect_key() compare an array of the keys you want to verify with the array you are checking. If the length of the output is the same as the array of keys to check, they're all present. – Michael Berkowski Nov 1 '12 at 1:04
  • Wyzard, I have other arrays that contain message, but not story, but those have other keys that an array with either story, or story and message would only contain. Thanks – Ryan Nov 1 '12 at 1:07
  • Are you confusing keys and values here? Is the array formatted like ["story & message" => "value"] or is it more like ["story & message"] – GordonM Jan 25 '17 at 9:34

19 Answers 19

57

If you only have 2 keys to check (like in the original question), it's probably easy enough to just call array_key_exists() twice to check if the keys exists.

if (array_key_exists("story", $arr) && array_key_exists("message", $arr)) {
    // Both keys exist.
}

However this obviously doesn't scale up well to many keys. In that situation a custom function would help.

function array_keys_exists(array $keys, array $arr) {
   return !array_diff_key(array_flip($keys), $arr);
}
  • 3
    If people think the other solutions are better for checking if an array has two members present, they must not like clear readable code or performance :) – alex Mar 16 '16 at 8:30
  • This is probably the simplest solution if your required keys are relatively few. If will become unreadable if they're something like 20 or 30. – apokryfos May 9 '16 at 12:34
  • 1
    @apokryfos Agree, but it does answer the OP's question. – alex May 9 '16 at 12:51
  • 2
    @alex the only issue is that if $keys contains one element that is not in $arr and another that is in it, !array_diff_key returns empty => false (3v4l example)... – CPHPython Aug 17 '18 at 10:10
  • 3
    I think this can be made more readable by using !array_diff($keys, array_keys($array)); because there is a little less cognitive load involved in working out those array_flips. – moopet Mar 29 '19 at 12:05
184

Here is a solution that's scalable, even if you want to check for a large number of keys:

<?php

// The values in this arrays contains the names of the indexes (keys) 
// that should exist in the data array
$required = array('key1', 'key2', 'key3');

$data = array(
    'key1' => 10,
    'key2' => 20,
    'key3' => 30,
    'key4' => 40,
);

if (count(array_intersect_key(array_flip($required), $data)) === count($required)) {
    // All required keys exist!
}
  • I would like to know the reason why this got downvoted.. afaik this is faster because array_intersect_key is implemented in C and you won't need a loop – Erfan Aug 16 '13 at 1:09
  • Pretty clever actually, well done - though a bit hard to read. – Jon z Oct 26 '13 at 16:06
  • Thanks :) It's odd PHP doesn't have a built-in function to do this - it's quite common. There are tons of user input validation classes that do this, but for most use-cases its overkill – Erfan Oct 30 '13 at 8:35
  • 11
    Clever solution indeed but it's really slower (about 50% slower on my box) than a straightforward : ``` $ok = true; foreach( $required as $field ) { if( !array_key_exists( $field, $data ) ) $ok = false; } – Ozh Dec 24 '13 at 17:29
  • @Ozh aside from that array_key_exists is slower than isset – iautomation Mar 1 '16 at 22:49
33

Surprisingly array_keys_exist doesn't exist?! In the interim that leaves some space to figure out a single line expression for this common task. I'm thinking of a shell script or another small program.

Note: each of the following solutions use concise […] array declaration syntax available in php 5.4+

array_diff + array_keys

if (0 === count(array_diff(['story', 'message', '…'], array_keys($source)))) {
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

(hat tip to Kim Stacks)

This approach is the most brief I've found. array_diff() returns an array of items present in argument 1 not present in argument2. Therefore an empty array indicates all keys were found. In php 5.5 you could simplify 0 === count(…) to be simply empty(…).

array_reduce + unset

if (0 === count(array_reduce(array_keys($source), 
    function($in, $key){ unset($in[array_search($key, $in)]); return $in; }, 
    ['story', 'message', '…'])))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

Harder to read, easy to change. array_reduce() uses a callback to iterate over an array to arrive at a value. By feeding the keys we're interested in the $initial value of $in and then removing keys found in source we can expect to end with 0 elements if all keys were found.

The construction is easy to modify since the keys we're interested in fit nicely on the bottom line.

array_filter & in_array

if (2 === count(array_filter(array_keys($source), function($key) { 
        return in_array($key, ['story', 'message']); }
    )))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

Simpler to write than the array_reduce solution but slightly tricker to edit. array_filter is also an iterative callback that allows you to create a filtered array by returning true (copy item to new array) or false (don't copy) in the callback. The gotchya is that you must change 2 to the number of items you expect.

This can be made more durable but verge's on preposterous readability:

$find = ['story', 'message'];
if (count($find) === count(array_filter(array_keys($source), function($key) use ($find) { return in_array($key, $find); })))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}
  • 2
    the difference will be negligible for small sets. if you're writing a library/framework that handles large sets of data you should probably performance test each unit to find bottlenecks rather than prematurely optimize. – Mark Fox Nov 25 '14 at 19:17
14

It seems to me, that the easiest method by far would be this:

$required = array('a','b','c','d');

$values = array(
    'a' => '1',
    'b' => '2'
);

$missing = array_diff_key(array_flip($required), $values);

Prints:

Array(
    [c] => 2
    [d] => 3
)

This also allows to check which keys are missing exactly. This might be useful for error handling.

  • This is what I came here for! – eNeMetcH May 18 '17 at 12:56
7

The above solutions are clever, but very slow. A simple foreach loop with isset is more than twice as fast as the array_intersect_key solution.

function array_keys_exist($keys, $array){
    foreach($keys as $key){
        if(!array_key_exists($key, $array))return false;
    }
    return true;
}

(344ms vs 768ms for 1000000 iterations)

  • isset will return false if ['key' => null] and sometimes you have arrays with null values. You should use array_key_exists instead isset – j4r3k Jun 17 '16 at 11:43
  • I had to use the opposite here because of the premature return with false (false overrides true in this case). So, what works for my needs is foreach ($keys as $key) { if (array_key_exists($key, $array)) { return true; }} return false; My needs were if any key in an array exists in another array... – Geoff Aug 9 '17 at 22:23
4

One more possible solution:

if (!array_diff(['story', 'message'], array_keys($array))) {
    // OK: all the keys are in $array
} else {
   // FAIL: some keys are not
}
3

What about this:

isset($arr['key1'], $arr['key2']) 

only return true if both are not null

if is null, key is not in array

  • 1
    if the value of $arr['key1'] or $arr['key2'] is null, the code will, the key still exist. – Xorifelse Jul 4 '16 at 12:10
  • I wrote a test please look at it @Xorifelse test and please correct me if I'm wrong. FYI: that time I knew only PHP 5.6.* version so I did for it only. – David Dutkovsky Jun 8 '17 at 3:28
  • What is that code trying to accomplish? Why are you not just using a foreach loop? – Xorifelse Jun 8 '17 at 12:37
  • I wanted to add a prove that isset function works how I meant it, but now I realize that you were right, keys still remain in an array and therefore my answer is not correct, thank for feedback. Yes, I could use it foreach. – David Dutkovsky Jun 9 '17 at 1:04
2

If you have something like this:

$stuff = array();
$stuff[0] = array('story' => 'A story', 'message' => 'in a bottle');
$stuff[1] = array('story' => 'Foo');

You could simply count():

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (count($value) == 2) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // only story
  }
}

This only works if you know for sure that you ONLY have these array keys, and nothing else.

Using array_key_exists() only supports checking one key at a time, so you will need to check both seperately:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (array_key_exists('story', $value) && array_key_exists('message', $value) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

array_key_exists() returns true if the key is present in the array, but it is a real function and a lot to type. The language construct isset() will almost do the same, except if the tested value is NULL:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story']) && isset($value['message']) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

Additionally isset allows to check multiple variables at once:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story'], $value['message']) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

Now, to optimize the test for stuff that is set, you'd better use this "if":

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story']) {
    if (isset($value['message']) {
      // story and message
    } else {
      // only story
    }
  } else {
    // No story - but message not checked
  }
}
1

This is the function I wrote for myself to use within a class.

<?php
/**
 * Check the keys of an array against a list of values. Returns true if all values in the list
 is not in the array as a key. Returns false otherwise.
 *
 * @param $array Associative array with keys and values
 * @param $mustHaveKeys Array whose values contain the keys that MUST exist in $array
 * @param &$missingKeys Array. Pass by reference. An array of the missing keys in $array as string values.
 * @return Boolean. Return true only if all the values in $mustHaveKeys appear in $array as keys.
 */
    function checkIfKeysExist($array, $mustHaveKeys, &$missingKeys = array()) {
        // extract the keys of $array as an array
        $keys = array_keys($array);
        // ensure the keys we look for are unique
        $mustHaveKeys = array_unique($mustHaveKeys);
        // $missingKeys = $mustHaveKeys - $keys
        // we expect $missingKeys to be empty if all goes well
        $missingKeys = array_diff($mustHaveKeys, $keys);
        return empty($missingKeys);
    }


$arrayHasStoryAsKey = array('story' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasMessageAsKey = array('message' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey = array('story' => 'some value', 'message' => 'some value','some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasNone = array('xxx' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');

$keys = array('story', 'message');
if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasStoryAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasStoryAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasStoryAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasMessageAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasMessageAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasMessageAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasNone, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasNone has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasNone does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

I am assuming you need to check for multiple keys ALL EXIST in an array. If you are looking for a match of at least one key, let me know so I can provide another function.

Codepad here http://codepad.viper-7.com/AKVPCH

  • 1
    The solution is fine but there's a nice one-line gem buried: if (0 === count(array_diff(['key1','key2','key3'], array_keys($lookIn)))) { // all keys exist } else { // nope } – Mark Fox Apr 22 '14 at 0:17
  • What you write is true. I do find my function more readable though verbose. Of course, I could be mistaken. Thanks for commenting on my answer. I learn something new. – Kim Stacks Apr 22 '14 at 7:22
1

try this

$required=['a','b'];$data=['a'=>1,'b'=>2];
if(count(array_intersect($required,array_keys($data))>0){
    //a key or all keys in required exist in data
 }else{
    //no keys found
  }
1

Hope this helps:

function array_keys_exist($searchForKeys = array(), $inArray = array()) {
    $inArrayKeys = array_keys($inArray);
    return count(array_intersect($searchForKeys, $inArrayKeys)) == count($searchForKeys); 
}
1

I use something like this quite often

$wantedKeys = ['story', 'message'];
$hasWantedKeys = count(array_intersect(array_keys($source), $wantedKeys)) > 0

or to find the values for the wanted keys

$wantedValues = array_intersect_key($source, array_fill_keys($wantedKeys, 1))
0

Does this not work?

array_key_exists('story', $myarray) && array_key_exists('message', $myarray)
  • 2
    Constants cannot be arrays... :) – Sven Nov 1 '12 at 1:13
  • I always forget the $ when not writing in my super code checking autocomplete IDE. =) – Kiwi Nov 2 '12 at 18:13
0
<?php

function check_keys_exists($keys_str = "", $arr = array()){
    $return = false;
    if($keys_str != "" and !empty($arr)){
        $keys = explode(',', $keys_str);
        if(!empty($keys)){
            foreach($keys as $key){
                $return = array_key_exists($key, $arr);
                if($return == false){
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return $return;
}

//run demo

$key = 'a,b,c';
$array = array('a'=>'aaaa','b'=>'ccc','c'=>'eeeee');

var_dump( check_keys_exists($key, $array));
0

I am not sure, if it is bad idea but I use very simple foreach loop to check multiple array key.

// get post attachment source url
$image     = wp_get_attachment_image_src(get_post_thumbnail_id($post_id), 'single-post-thumbnail');
// read exif data
$tech_info = exif_read_data($image[0]);

// set require keys
$keys = array('Make', 'Model');

// run loop to add post metas foreach key
foreach ($keys as $key => $value)
{
    if (array_key_exists($value, $tech_info))
    {
        // add/update post meta
        update_post_meta($post_id, MPC_PREFIX . $value, $tech_info[$value]);
    }
} 
0
// sample data
$requiredKeys = ['key1', 'key2', 'key3'];
$arrayToValidate = ['key1' => 1, 'key2' => 2, 'key3' => 3];

function keysExist(array $requiredKeys, array $arrayToValidate) {
    if ($requiredKeys === array_keys($arrayToValidate)) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}
0
$myArray = array('key1' => '', 'key2' => '');
$keys = array('key1', 'key2', 'key3');
$keyExists = count(array_intersect($keys, array_keys($myArray)));

Will return true, because there are keys from $keys array in $myArray

0

Something as this could be used

//Say given this array
$array_in_use2 = ['hay' => 'come', 'message' => 'no', 'story' => 'yes'];
//This gives either true or false if story and message is there
count(array_intersect(['story', 'message'], array_keys($array_in_use2))) === 2;

Note the check against 2, if the values you want to search is different you can change.

This solution may not be efficient, but it works!

Updates

In one fat function:

 /**
 * Like php array_key_exists, this instead search if (one or more) keys exists in the array
 * @param array $needles - keys to look for in the array
 * @param array $haystack - the <b>Associative</b> array to search
 * @param bool $all - [Optional] if false then checks if some keys are found
 * @return bool true if the needles are found else false. <br>
 * Note: if hastack is multidimentional only the first layer is checked<br>,
 * the needles should <b>not be<b> an associative array else it returns false<br>
 * The array to search must be associative array too else false may be returned
 */
function array_keys_exists($needles, $haystack, $all = true)
{
    $size = count($needles);
    if($all) return count(array_intersect($needles, array_keys($haystack))) === $size;
    return !empty(array_intersect($needles, array_keys($haystack)));

}

So for example with this:

$array_in_use2 = ['hay' => 'come', 'message' => 'no', 'story' => 'yes'];
//One of them exists --> true
$one_or_more_exists = array_keys_exists(['story', 'message'], $array_in_use2, false);
//all of them exists --> true
$all_exists = array_keys_exists(['story', 'message'], $array_in_use2);

Hope this helps :)

0

This is old and will probably get buried, but this is my attempt.

I had an issue similar to @Ryan. In some cases, I needed to only check if at least 1 key was in an array, and in some cases, all needed to be present.

So I wrote this function:

/**
 * A key check of an array of keys
 * @param array $keys_to_check An array of keys to check
 * @param array $array_to_check The array to check against
 * @param bool $strict Checks that all $keys_to_check are in $array_to_check | Default: false
 * @return bool
 */
function array_keys_exist(array $keys_to_check, array $array_to_check, $strict = false) {
    // Results to pass back //
    $results = false;

    // If all keys are expected //
    if ($strict) {
        // Strict check //

        // Keys to check count //
        $ktc = count($keys_to_check);
        // Array to check count //
        $atc = count(array_intersect($keys_to_check, array_keys($array_to_check)));

        // Compare all //
        if ($ktc === $atc) {
            $results = true;
        }
    } else {
        // Loose check - to see if some keys exist //

        // Loop through all keys to check //
        foreach ($keys_to_check as $ktc) {
            // Check if key exists in array to check //
            if (array_key_exists($ktc, $array_to_check)) {
                $results = true;
                // We found at least one, break loop //
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return $results;
}

This was a lot easier than having to write multiple || and && blocks.

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