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I am writing a shell script to enter multiple folders. I am currently storing the name of folder in a shell variable as so path="October\ @012/". If I do cd $path I receive the error bash: cd: October\: No such file or directory

What am I doing wrong?

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This is the (principal) function of double quotes, and it's true in csh and *sh shells.

cd "$TARGET"

should do it.

Shell variables are expanded within "..." (unlike within '...'), but the quoted text is regarded as a single argument when the shell parses the command line to construct the strings which are passed to the program.

For example:

% ls -F
October @012/
% TARGET="October @012"
% cd $TARGET
bash: cd: October: No such file or directory
% cd "$TARGET"
% pwd
/tmp/t/October @012
% 

Simple!

What you're doing wrong in your initial example is escaping the space inside the quotes. The space doesn't have to be escaped twice, and because this redundant \ is appearing inside the quotes, it just inserts a backslash into the TARGET variable. For example:

% TARGET="October\ @012"  # wrong!
% ls
October @012/
% cd $TARGET
bash: cd: October\: No such file or directory
% cd "$TARGET"
bash: cd: October\ @012: No such file or directory
% 

This setting of TARGET would only work if the directory were named October\ @012, with a backslash in it (not recommended!):

% mkdir October\\\ @012
% ls -F
October\ @012/
% cd "$TARGET"
% pwd
/tmp/t/October\ @012
% 

(EDITED to add example)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for pointing out my folly in answering questions in the middle of the night during lack of sleep. You of course are right and I edited my answer before I saw that you had correctly answered the question. – zzzirk Nov 1 '12 at 12:45
  • Please help me with this:I am writing a shell script to enter multiple folders. I am currently storing the name of folder in a shell variable as so path="October\ @012/". If I do cd $path I receive the error bash: cd: October\: No such file or directory What am I doing wrong? – anand2308 Nov 2 '12 at 6:28
  • Thank You Norman, This worked and also thanks for the explanation, it helped a lot – anand2308 Nov 3 '12 at 7:48
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EDIT: I originally had written to recommend using curly braces. I wrote this when I had awoke in the middle of the night and have modified my answer.

First off it really depends on which shell you are writing your script in. If it is bash then you could try using quotation marks around your variable name:

TARGET="October @012"

cd "$TARGET"

This may work in other shells as well. I would suggest you try it.

EDIT:

On re-examining this it appears you are escaping the wrong part in your expression. Try this:

path="October \@012"

cd "$path"
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your reply, it is taking October and @012 as two different folders. But the folder name is "October @012" (space separated), I also tried ur method but got this error bash: cd: October: No such file or directory – anand2308 Nov 1 '12 at 9:55
  • No, that's not the function of the ${...} syntax. Here, the ${TARGET} would be expanded to cd October @012, and then split at spaces into words, exactly as before. ${...} is for the case where the expansion might get confused (for example $TARGETX vs ${TARGET}X, or where you want to do other processing (compare echo $foo, where $foo is undefined, vs echo ${foo:-bar}) – Norman Gray Nov 1 '12 at 12:27
  • That's what I get for answering questions when I wake in the middle of the night and can't seem to sleep. When I have used this in the past I have been solving the problem you Norman addressed, along with wrapping in quotes "" to address the OPs problem. – zzzirk Nov 1 '12 at 12:40
  • Please help me with this issue: I am writing a shell script to enter multiple folders. I am currently storing the name of folder in a shell variable as so path="October\ @012/". If I do cd $path I receive the error bash: cd: October\: No such file or directory Its urgent – anand2308 Nov 2 '12 at 6:46
  • Okay, so can you not use cd "$path" as both I and Norman have mentioned and accomplish what you are wanting? – zzzirk Nov 2 '12 at 12:36

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