112

I recently came across this article on how to write a singleton in Node.js. I know the documentation of require states that:

Modules are cached after the first time they are loaded. Multiple calls to require('foo') may not cause the module code to be executed multiple times.

So it seems that every required module can be easily used as a singleton without the singleton boilerplate-code.

Question:

Does the above article provide a round about solution to creating a singleton?

1

10 Answers 10

151

All of the above is overcomplicated. There is a school of thought which says design patterns are showing deficiencies of actual language.

Languages with prototype-based OOP (classless) do not need a singleton pattern at all. You simply create a single(ton) object on the fly and then use it.

As for modules in node, yes, by default they are cached, but it can be tweaked for example if you want hot-loading of module changes.

But yes, if you want to use shared object all over, putting it in a module exports is fine. Just do not complicate it with "singleton pattern", no need for it in JavaScript.

13
  • 33
    It's weird nobody's getting upvotes... have a +1 for There is a school of thought which says design patterns are showing deficiencies of actual language.
    – Esailija
    Nov 1, 2012 at 14:39
  • 82
    Singletons are not an anti-pattern.
    – wprl
    Apr 26, 2013 at 14:41
  • 5
    @herby, seems like an overly-specific (and therefore incorrect) definition of the singleton pattern.
    – wprl
    Nov 13, 2013 at 21:17
  • 24
    The documentation reads: "Multiple calls to require('foo') may not cause the module code to be executed multiple times.". It says "may not", it does not say "will not", so asking how to make sure the module instance is created only once in an application is a valid question from my point of view.
    – xorcus
    Dec 24, 2014 at 16:29
  • 9
    It is misleading that this is the correct answer for this question. As @mike pointed out below, it is possible that a module gets loaded more than once and you have two instances. I'm hitting that issue where I only have one copy of Knockout but two instances are created because the module is loaded twice.
    – dgaviola
    Apr 29, 2015 at 14:49
75

This has basically to do with nodejs caching. Plain and simple.

https://nodejs.org/api/modules.html#modules_caching

(v 6.3.1)

Caching

Modules are cached after the first time they are loaded. This means (among other things) that every call to require('foo') will get exactly the same object returned, if it would resolve to the same file.

Multiple calls to require('foo') may not cause the module code to be executed multiple times. This is an important feature. With it, "partially done" objects can be returned, thus allowing transitive dependencies to be loaded even when they would cause cycles.

If you want to have a module execute code multiple times, then export a function, and call that function.

Module Caching Caveats

Modules are cached based on their resolved filename. Since modules may resolve to a different filename based on the location of the calling module (loading from node_modules folders), it is not a guarantee that require('foo') will always return the exact same object, if it would resolve to different files.

Additionally, on case-insensitive file systems or operating systems, different resolved filenames can point to the same file, but the cache will still treat them as different modules and will reload the file multiple times. For example, require('./foo') and require('./FOO') return two different objects, irrespective of whether or not ./foo and ./FOO are the same file.

So in simple terms.

If you want a Singleton; export an object.

If you do not want a Singleton; export a function (and do stuff/return stuff/whatever in that function).

To be VERY clear, if you do this properly it should work, look at https://stackoverflow.com/a/33746703/1137669 (Allen Luce's answer). It explains in code what happens when caching fails due to differently resolved filenames. But if you ALWAYS resolve to the same filename it should work.

Update 2016

creating a true singleton in node.js with es6 symbols Another solution: in this link

Update 2020

This answer refers to CommonJS (Node.js's own way to import/export modules). Node.js will most likely be switching over to ECMAScript Modules: https://nodejs.org/api/esm.html (ECMAScript is the real name of JavaScript if you didn't know)

When migrating to ECMAScript read the following for now: https://nodejs.org/api/esm.html#esm_writing_dual_packages_while_avoiding_or_minimizing_hazards

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  • 7
    If you want a Singleton; export an object ... that helped thanks
    – danday74
    Aug 5, 2017 at 12:43
  • 2
    This is kind of a bad idea - for many reasons given elsewhere on this page - but the concept is essentially valid, which is to say that under the established nominal circumstances, the claims in this answer are true. If you want a quick and dirty singleton, this will likely work - just don't launch any shuttles with the code. Aug 8, 2017 at 23:51
  • @AdamTolley "for many reasons given elsewhere on this page", are you referring to symlinking files or misspelling file names which apparently do not utilize the same cache? It does state in the documentation the issue regarding case-insensitive file systems or operating systems. Regarding symlinking, you can read more here as it was discussed github.com/nodejs/node/issues/3402. Also if you are symlinking files or do not understand your OS and node properly then you shouldn't be anywhere near the aerospace engineering industry ;), I do however understand your point^^.
    – basickarl
    Aug 9, 2017 at 7:40
  • 2
    @KarlMorrison - just for the fact the documentation does not guarantee it, the fact that it seems to be unspecified behavior, or any other rational reason for not trusting this particular behavior of the language. Maybe the cache works differently in another implementation, or you like working in REPL's and subvert the caching feature altogether. My point is the cache is an implementation detail, and it's use as a singleton equivalent is a clever hack. I love clever hacks, but they should be differentiated, that's all - ( also no one is launching shuttles with node, i was being silly ) Aug 9, 2017 at 22:06
  • So what if I want a singleton class that actually accepts parameters in the constructor ? I can't just export an object in that case.
    – Rose
    Nov 17, 2022 at 19:16
31

No. When Node's module caching fails, that singleton pattern fails. I modified the example to run meaningfully on OSX:

var sg = require("./singleton.js");
var sg2 = require("./singleton.js");
sg.add(1, "test");
sg2.add(2, "test2");

console.log(sg.getSocketList(), sg2.getSocketList());

This gives the output the author anticipated:

{ '1': 'test', '2': 'test2' } { '1': 'test', '2': 'test2' }

But a small modification defeats caching. On OSX, do this:

var sg = require("./singleton.js");
var sg2 = require("./SINGLETON.js");
sg.add(1, "test");
sg2.add(2, "test2");

console.log(sg.getSocketList(), sg2.getSocketList());

Or, on Linux:

% ln singleton.js singleton2.js

Then change the sg2 require line to:

var sg2 = require("./singleton2.js");

And bam, the singleton is defeated:

{ '1': 'test' } { '2': 'test2' }

I don't know of an acceptable way to get around this. If you really feel the need to make something singleton-like and are okay with polluting the global namespace (and the many problems that can result), you can change the author's getInstance() and exports lines to:

singleton.getInstance = function(){
  if(global.singleton_instance === undefined)
    global.singleton_instance = new singleton();
  return global.singleton_instance;
}

module.exports = singleton.getInstance();

That said, I've never run into a situation on a production system where I needed to do anything like this. I've also never felt the need to use the singleton pattern in Javascript.

2
  • It’s interesting to read this. However, the final conclusion is: you must deliberately break your code (in this case node caching mechanism) to break singleton pattern in Node.JS!
    – iaforek
    Feb 9, 2022 at 14:55
  • While I took deliberate steps to demonstrate one way in which singleton assumptions can be violated, there's no guarantee that a similar situation can't arise without the programmer intending it to.
    – Allen Luce
    Feb 9, 2022 at 17:58
22

Looking a little further at the Module Caching Caveats in the Modules docs:

Modules are cached based on their resolved filename. Since modules may resolve to a different filename based on the location of the calling module (loading from node_modules folders), it is not a guarantee that require('foo') will always return the exact same object, if it would resolve to different files.

So, depending on where you are when you're requiring a module, it's possible to get a different instance of the module.

Sounds like modules are not a simple solution to creating singletons.

Edit: Or maybe they are. Like @mkoryak, I can't come up with a case where a single file might resolve to different filenames (without using symlinks). But (as @JohnnyHK comments), multiple copies of a file in different node_modules directories will each be loaded and stored separately.

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  • ok, i read that 3 times and i still cant think on an example where it would resolve to a different filename. help?
    – mkoryak
    Nov 1, 2012 at 17:17
  • 1
    @mkoryak I think that's referring to cases where you've got two different modules you're requiring from node_modules where each depend on the same module, but there are separate copies of that dependent module under the node_modules subdirectory of each of the two different modules.
    – JohnnyHK
    Nov 1, 2012 at 18:33
  • @mike you are right here that module get instantiated multiple times when referenced through different paths. I hit the case when writing unit tests for the server modules. I need kind of singleton instance. how to achieve it?
    – Sushil
    Jun 10, 2013 at 11:53
  • An example might be relative paths. eg. Given require('./db') is in two separate files, the code for the db module executes twice Dec 28, 2013 at 2:37
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    I just had a nasty bug since the node module system is case-insenstivie. i called require('../lib/myModule.js'); in one file and require('../lib/mymodule.js'); in another and it did not deliver the same object.
    – heyarne
    Oct 21, 2014 at 14:23
19

A singleton in node.js (or in browser JS, for that matter) like that is completely unnecessary.

Since modules are cached and stateful, the example given on the link you provided could easily be rewritten much more simply:

var socketList = {};

exports.add = function (userId, socket) {
    if (!socketList[userId]) {
        socketList[userId] = socket;
    }
};

exports.remove = function (userId) {
    delete socketList[userId];
};

exports.getSocketList = function () {
    return socketList;
};
// or
// exports.socketList = socketList
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    Docs say "may not cause the module code to be executed multiple times", so it is possible that it will be called multiple times, and if this code is executed again, the socketList will be reset to an empty list
    – Jonathan.
    Aug 22, 2014 at 18:11
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    @Jonathan. The context in the docs around that quote seem to make a pretty convincing case that may not is being used in an RFC-style MUST NOT.
    – Michael
    Mar 2, 2015 at 15:32
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    @Michael "may" is a funny word like that. Fancy having a word that when negated means either "perhaps not" or "definitely not"..
    – OJFord
    Aug 13, 2015 at 22:48
  • 1
    The may not applies when you npm link other modules during development. So be careful when using modules that rely on a single instance such as an eventBus. Feb 4, 2016 at 20:00
14

The only answer here that uses ES6 classes

// SummaryModule.js
class Summary {

  init(summary) {
    this.summary = summary
  }

  anotherMethod() {
    // do something
  }
}

module.exports = new Summary()

require this singleton with:

const summary = require('./SummaryModule')
summary.init(true)
summary.anotherMethod()

Only problem here is that you cannot pass params to the class constructor but that can be circumvented by manually calling an init method.

3
  • the question is "are singletons needed", not "how do you write one"
    – mkoryak
    Oct 13, 2017 at 17:17
  • @danday74 How we can use same instance summary in another class, without initializing it again? Sep 18, 2018 at 2:21
  • 1
    In Node.js just require it in another file ... const summary = require('./SummaryModule') ... and it will be the same instance. You can test this by creating a member variable and setting its value in one file that requires it and then getting its value in another file that requires it. It should be the value that was set.
    – danday74
    Sep 18, 2018 at 7:28
12

You don't need anything special to do a singleton in js, the code in the article could just as well be:

var socketList = {};

module.exports = {
      add: function() {

      },

      ...
};

Outside node.js (for instance, in browser js), you need to add the wrapper function manually (it is done automatically in node.js):

var singleton = function() {
    var socketList = {};
    return {
        add: function() {},
        ...
    };
}();
2
  • As pointed out by @Allen Luce, if node's caching fails the singleton pattern also fails.
    – rakeen
    Nov 17, 2017 at 13:10
  • An example with parameters would be helpful as this relates to nodeJs caching
    – Rose
    Nov 17, 2022 at 19:29
7

Singletons are fine in JS, they just don't need to be so verbose.

In node if you need a singleton, for instance to use the same ORM/DB instance across various files in your server layer, you can stuff the reference into a global variable.

Just write a module that creates the global var if it doesn't exist, then returns a reference to that.

@allen-luce had it right with his footnote code example copied here:

singleton.getInstance = function(){
  if(global.singleton_instance === undefined)
    global.singleton_instance = new singleton();
  return global.singleton_instance;
};

module.exports = singleton.getInstance();

but it is important to note that using the new keyword is not required. Any old object, function, iife, etc. will work - there is no OOP voodoo happening here.

bonus points if you closure a some obj inside a function that returns a reference to it, and make that function a global - then even reassignment of the global variable won't clobber the instances already created from it - though this is questionably useful.

3
  • you dont need any of that. you can just do module.exports = new Foo() because module.exports will not execute again, unless you do something really stupid
    – mkoryak
    Jun 7, 2016 at 0:46
  • You absolutely should NOT rely on implementation side effects. If you need a single instance just tie it to a global, in case the implementation changes. Jun 7, 2016 at 16:40
  • The above answer was also a misunderstanding of the original question as 'Should I use singletons in JS or does the language make them unnecessary?', which seems also to be an issue with a lot of the other answers. I stand by my recommendation against using the require implementation as a replacement for a proper, explicit singleton implementation. Oct 10, 2019 at 19:09
1

Keeping it simple.

foo.js

function foo() {

  bar: {
    doSomething: function(arg, callback) {
      return callback('Echo ' + arg);
    };
  }

  return bar;
};

module.exports = foo();

Then just

var foo = require(__dirname + 'foo');
foo.doSomething('Hello', function(result){ console.log(result); });
1
  • the question is "are singletons needed", not "how do you write one"
    – mkoryak
    Oct 13, 2017 at 17:18
1

If you want to use classes, it's the shortest and most beautiful

module.exports = new class foo {...}

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