27

I'm just looking for an easy way to divide a number (or provide other math functions). Let's say I have the following command:

find . -name '*.mp4' | wc -l

How can I take the result of wc -l and divide it by 3?

The examples I've seen don't deal with re-directed out/in.

3
  • 3
    note that bash cannot do floating point math. Commented Nov 1, 2012 at 17:10
  • 1
    I think I've found The best way to divide in bash using pipes! See recently added shell connector in my answer Commented Feb 22, 2018 at 9:54
  • @c00kiemon5ter with 64bits integer, bash could do pseudo floating-point with enough precision in many case! Commented Feb 22, 2018 at 9:58

4 Answers 4

58

Using bc:

$ bc -l <<< "scale=2;$(find . -name '*.mp4' | wc -l)/3"
2.33

In contrast, the bash shell only performs integer arithmetic.

Awk is also very powerful:

$ find . -name '*.mp4' | wc -l | awk '{print $1/3}'
2.33333

You don't even need wc if using awk:

$ find . -name '*.mp4' | awk 'END {print NR/3}'
2.33333
3
  • How would you assign the awk 2.333 to a variable?
    – Mote Zart
    Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 22:16
  • your_variable=$(find . -name '*.mp4' | awk 'END {print NR/3}')
    – Matt
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 17:11
  • awk is much slower than wc though, so (...) | wc -l | awk 'END {print $1/3}' would be preferred, no?
    – ATpoint
    Commented Nov 20, 2022 at 11:48
15

Edit 2018-02-22: Adding shell connector

There is more than 1 way

Depending on precision required and number of calculations to be done. See shell connector further!

Using bc (binary calculator)

find . -type f -name '*.mp4' -printf \\n | wc -l | xargs printf "%d/3\n" | bc -l
6243.33333333333333333333

or

echo $(find . -name '*.mp4' -printf \\n | wc -l)/3|bc -l
6243.33333333333333333333

Using integer builtin math processor

Using bash, result in integer only:

echo $(($(find . -name '*.mp4' -printf \\n| wc -l)/3))
6243

Pseudo floating point by shifting number (multiply by 100 and place a radix point at 2 digits from end):

res=000$((($(find  . -type f -name '*.mp4' -printf "1+")0)*1000/3))
printf -v res "%.2f" ${res:0:${#res}-3}.${res:${#res}-3}
echo $res
6243.33

Pure

You could even use @glennjackman's ideas of using globstar, then computing pseudo floating could be done by:

shopt -s globstar
shopt -s nullglob
files=(**/*.mp4)
shopt -u globstar
res=000$(( ${#files[*]}000 / 3 ))
printf -v res "%.2f" ${res:0:${#res}-3}.${res:${#res}-3}
echo $res
6243.33

There is no fork and $res contains a two-digit rounded floating value.

Note: Care about symlinks when using globstar and **!

Introducing shell connector

If you plan to do a lot of calculations, require high precision and use , you could use a long-running bc subprocess:

New method, using coproc

coproc BC { exec bc -l;}
[1] 591795

then now:

echo >&${BC[1]} '21*2'
read -ru ${BC[0]} answer
echo $answer
42

This subprocess stay open and useable:

ps --sid $(ps ho sid $$) fw
    PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 336968 pts/17   Ss     0:00 bash
 591795 pts/17   S      0:00  \_ bc -l
 596411 pts/17   R+     0:00  \_ ps --sid 336968 fw

or

ps $BC_PID
    PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 591795 pts/17   S      0:00 bc -l

echo >&${BC[1]} '4*a(1)';read -ru ${BC[0]} Pi;echo $Pi 
3.14159265358979323844

Then closing bc's FD must terminate them:

exec {BC[0]}<&- ; exec {BC[1]}>&-
[1]+  Done                    coproc BC { exec bc -l; }

If not, you could even kill $BC_PID...

Old method, using fifo

mkfifo /tmp/mybcfifo
exec 5> >(exec bc -l >/tmp/mybcfifo)
exec 6</tmp/mybcfifo
rm /tmp/mybcfifo

then now:

echo >&5 '12/34'
read -u 6 result
echo $result
.35294117647058823529

This subprocess stays open and usable:

ps --sid $(ps ho sid $$) fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
18027 pts/9    Ss     0:00 bash
18258 pts/9    S      0:00  \_ bc -l
18789 pts/9    R+     0:00  \_ ps --sid 18027 fw

Computing $PI:

echo >&5 '4*a(1)'
read -u 6 PI
echo $PI
3.14159265358979323844

To terminate the subprocess:

exec 6<&-
exec 5>&-

Little demo about the best way to divide in Bash using pipes!

Computing range {1..157} / 42 ( I will let you google for the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything ;)

... and print 13 results by lines in order to reduce output:

printf -v form "%s" "%5.3f "{,}{,}{,,};form+="%5.3f\n";

By regular way

testBc(){
    for ((i=1; i<157; i++)) ;do
        echo $(bc -l <<<"$i/42");
    done
}

By using a long-running bc subprocess:

testLongBc(){
    coproc BC { exec bc -l ;}
    for ((i=1; i<157; i++)); do
        echo "$i/42" >&${BC[1]}
        read -ru ${BC[0]} result
        echo $result
    done
    exec {BC[0]}>&-
    exec {BC[1]}>&-
}

or

testLongBcOlder(){ 
    mkfifo /tmp/mybcfifo
    exec 5> >(exec bc -l >/tmp/mybcfifo)
    exec 6< /tmp/mybcfifo
    rm /tmp/mybcfifo
    for ((i=1; i<157; i++)) ;do
        echo "$i/42" 1>&5
        read -u 6 result
        echo $result
    done
    exec 6>&-
    exec 5>&-
}

Let's see without:

time printf "$form" $(testBc)
0.024 0.048 0.071 0.095 0.119 0.143 0.167 0.190 0.214 0.238 0.262 0.286 0.310
0.333 0.357 0.381 0.405 0.429 0.452 0.476 0.500 0.524 0.548 0.571 0.595 0.619
0.643 0.667 0.690 0.714 0.738 0.762 0.786 0.810 0.833 0.857 0.881 0.905 0.929
0.952 0.976 1.000 1.024 1.048 1.071 1.095 1.119 1.143 1.167 1.190 1.214 1.238
1.262 1.286 1.310 1.333 1.357 1.381 1.405 1.429 1.452 1.476 1.500 1.524 1.548
1.571 1.595 1.619 1.643 1.667 1.690 1.714 1.738 1.762 1.786 1.810 1.833 1.857
1.881 1.905 1.929 1.952 1.976 2.000 2.024 2.048 2.071 2.095 2.119 2.143 2.167
2.190 2.214 2.238 2.262 2.286 2.310 2.333 2.357 2.381 2.405 2.429 2.452 2.476
2.500 2.524 2.548 2.571 2.595 2.619 2.643 2.667 2.690 2.714 2.738 2.762 2.786
2.810 2.833 2.857 2.881 2.905 2.929 2.952 2.976 3.000 3.024 3.048 3.071 3.095
3.119 3.143 3.167 3.190 3.214 3.238 3.262 3.286 3.310 3.333 3.357 3.381 3.405
3.429 3.452 3.476 3.500 3.524 3.548 3.571 3.595 3.619 3.643 3.667 3.690 3.714

real    0m10.113s
user    0m0.900s
sys     0m1.290s

Wow! Ten seconds on my raspberry-pi!!

Then with:

time printf "$form" $(testLongBc)
0.024 0.048 0.071 0.095 0.119 0.143 0.167 0.190 0.214 0.238 0.262 0.286 0.310
0.333 0.357 0.381 0.405 0.429 0.452 0.476 0.500 0.524 0.548 0.571 0.595 0.619
0.643 0.667 0.690 0.714 0.738 0.762 0.786 0.810 0.833 0.857 0.881 0.905 0.929
0.952 0.976 1.000 1.024 1.048 1.071 1.095 1.119 1.143 1.167 1.190 1.214 1.238
1.262 1.286 1.310 1.333 1.357 1.381 1.405 1.429 1.452 1.476 1.500 1.524 1.548
1.571 1.595 1.619 1.643 1.667 1.690 1.714 1.738 1.762 1.786 1.810 1.833 1.857
1.881 1.905 1.929 1.952 1.976 2.000 2.024 2.048 2.071 2.095 2.119 2.143 2.167
2.190 2.214 2.238 2.262 2.286 2.310 2.333 2.357 2.381 2.405 2.429 2.452 2.476
2.500 2.524 2.548 2.571 2.595 2.619 2.643 2.667 2.690 2.714 2.738 2.762 2.786
2.810 2.833 2.857 2.881 2.905 2.929 2.952 2.976 3.000 3.024 3.048 3.071 3.095
3.119 3.143 3.167 3.190 3.214 3.238 3.262 3.286 3.310 3.333 3.357 3.381 3.405
3.429 3.452 3.476 3.500 3.524 3.548 3.571 3.595 3.619 3.643 3.667 3.690 3.714

real    0m0.670s
user    0m0.190s
sys     0m0.070s

Less than one second!!

Hopefully, results are the same, but the execution time is very different!

My shell connector

I've published a connector function: Connector-bash on GitHub.com and shell_connector.sh on my own site.

source shell_connector.sh
newConnector /usr/bin/bc -l 0 0
myBc 1764/42 result
echo $result
42.00000000000000000000
6

find . -name '*.mp4' | wc -l | xargs -I{} expr {} / 2

Best used if you have multiple outputs you'd like to pipe through xargs. Use{} as a placeholder for the expression term.

2
  • Results in an integer, not a float. Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 14:42
  • I had a slightly different problem, but: find . | grep -v /old/ | wc -l | xargs -I{} expr {} - 2 Works like a charm for my needs! Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 0:45
1

Depending on your bash version, you don't even need find for this simple task:

shopt -s nullglob globstar
files=( **/*.mp4 )
dc -e "3 k ${#files[@]} 3 / p"

This method will correctly handle the bizarre edgecase of filenames containing newlines.

3
  • Good idea(+1), but if bash, why dc ? (care about symlinks when working with globstar). see my answer Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 22:26
  • I'm not that hardcore about prohitibing external processes. Shells were created to be glue languages. Doing floating point math with strings is hideous. If you need a calculator, use a calculator -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_philosophy Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 22:31
  • You could avoid bad count by filename containing newline by find . -type f -name '*.mp4' -printf \\n|wc -l or echo $(($(find . -type f -name '*.mp4' -printf "1+")0)) Commented Jun 21, 2018 at 11:13

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