396

I am interested in knowing how to convert a pandas dataframe into a NumPy array.

dataframe:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

index = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
a = [np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1]
b = [0.2, np.nan, 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, np.nan, np.nan]
c = [np.nan, 0.5, 0.5, np.nan, 0.5, 0.5, np.nan]
df = pd.DataFrame({'A': a, 'B': b, 'C': c}, index=index)
df = df.rename_axis('ID')

gives

label   A    B    C
ID                                 
1   NaN  0.2  NaN
2   NaN  NaN  0.5
3   NaN  0.2  0.5
4   0.1  0.2  NaN
5   0.1  0.2  0.5
6   0.1  NaN  0.5
7   0.1  NaN  NaN

I would like to convert this to a NumPy array, as so:

array([[ nan,  0.2,  nan],
       [ nan,  nan,  0.5],
       [ nan,  0.2,  0.5],
       [ 0.1,  0.2,  nan],
       [ 0.1,  0.2,  0.5],
       [ 0.1,  nan,  0.5],
       [ 0.1,  nan,  nan]])

How can I do this?


As a bonus, is it possible to preserve the dtypes, like this?

array([[ 1, nan,  0.2,  nan],
       [ 2, nan,  nan,  0.5],
       [ 3, nan,  0.2,  0.5],
       [ 4, 0.1,  0.2,  nan],
       [ 5, 0.1,  0.2,  0.5],
       [ 6, 0.1,  nan,  0.5],
       [ 7, 0.1,  nan,  nan]],
     dtype=[('ID', '<i4'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8')])

or similar?

  • 3
    Why do you need this ? Aren't dataframes based on numpy arrays anyways ? You should be able to use a dataframe where you need an a numpy array. That's why you can use dataframes with scikit-learn where the functions ask for numpy arrays. – chrisfs Apr 22 '18 at 17:56
  • Here are a couple of possibly relevant links about dtypes & recarrays (aka record arrays or structured arrays): (1) stackoverflow.com/questions/9949427/… (2) stackoverflow.com/questions/52579601/… – JohnE Oct 11 '18 at 4:49

14 Answers 14

342

To convert a pandas dataframe (df) to a numpy ndarray, use this code:

df.values

array([[nan, 0.2, nan],
       [nan, nan, 0.5],
       [nan, 0.2, 0.5],
       [0.1, 0.2, nan],
       [0.1, 0.2, 0.5],
       [0.1, nan, 0.5],
       [0.1, nan, nan]])
  • 14
    This doesn't work, the dtype is still erased (you lose the names). – Joseph Garvin Feb 13 '17 at 17:05
  • 10
    This does not answers the question. – An economist Aug 8 '17 at 15:39
  • 3
    Regarding dtypes - Can't you just do df.astype(__yourtype__) afterwards? – Markus Mar 16 '18 at 17:30
  • 4
    @JosephGarvin I've added an answer that does. More importantly, .values should no longer be used from v0.24 onwards. I have explained why. – cs95 Feb 3 at 22:19
145

Deprecate your usage of values and as_matrix()!

From v0.24.0, we are introduced to two brand spanking new, preferred methods for obtaining NumPy arrays from pandas objects:

  1. to_numpy(), which is defined on Index, Series, and DataFrame objects, and
  2. array, which is defined on Index and Series objects only.

If you visit the v0.24 docs for .values, you will see a big red warning that says:

Warning: We recommend using DataFrame.to_numpy() instead.

See this section of the v0.24.0 release notes, and this answer for more information.


Towards Better Consistency: to_numpy()

In the spirit of better consistency throughout the API, a new method to_numpy has been introduced to extract the underlying NumPy array from DataFrames.

# Setup.
df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [1, 2, 3], 'B': [4, 5, 6]}, index=['a', 'b', 'c'])
df

   A  B
a  1  4
b  2  5
c  3  6

df.to_numpy()
array([[1, 4],
       [2, 5],
       [3, 6]])

As mentioned above, this method is also defined on Index and Series objects (see here).

df.index.to_numpy()
# array(['a', 'b', 'c'], dtype=object)

df['A'].to_numpy()
#  array([1, 2, 3])

By default, a view is returned, so any modifications made will affect the original.

v = df.to_numpy()
v[0, 0] = -1

df
   A  B
a -1  4
b  2  5
c  3  6

If you need a copy instead, use to_numpy(copy=True);

v = df.to_numpy(copy=True)
v[0, 0] = -123

df
   A  B
a  1  4
b  2  5
c  3  6

If you need to Preserve the dtypes...
As shown in another answer, DataFrame.to_records is a good way to do this.

df.to_records()
# rec.array([('a', -1, 4), ('b',  2, 5), ('c',  3, 6)],
#           dtype=[('index', 'O'), ('A', '<i8'), ('B', '<i8')])

This cannot be done with to_numpy, unfortunately. However, as an alternative, you can use np.rec.fromrecords:

v = df.reset_index()
np.rec.fromrecords(v, names=v.columns.tolist())
# rec.array([('a', -1, 4), ('b',  2, 5), ('c',  3, 6)],
#          dtype=[('index', '<U1'), ('A', '<i8'), ('B', '<i8')])

Performance wise, it's nearly the same (actually, using rec.fromrecords is a bit faster).

df2 = pd.concat([df] * 10000)

%timeit df2.to_records()
%%timeit
v = df2.reset_index()
np.rec.fromrecords(v, names=v.columns.tolist())

11.1 ms ± 557 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
9.67 ms ± 126 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Rationale for Adding a New Method

to_numpy() (in addition to array) was added as a result of discussions under two GitHub issues GH19954 and GH23623.

Specifically, the docs mention the rationale:

[...] with .values it was unclear whether the returned value would be the actual array, some transformation of it, or one of pandas custom arrays (like Categorical). For example, with PeriodIndex, .values generates a new ndarray of period objects each time. [...]

to_numpy aim to improve the consistency of the API, which is a major step in the right direction. .values will not be deprecated in the current version, but I expect this may happen at some point in the future, so I would urge users to migrate towards the newer API, as soon as you can.


Critique of Other Solutions

DataFrame.values has inconsistent behaviour, as already noted.

DataFrame.get_values() is simply a wrapper around DataFrame.values, so everything said above applies.

DataFrame.as_matrix() is deprecated now, do NOT use!

  • I don't understand how it is possible to read page after page after page of people screaming at the top of their lungs to switch from as_matrix to another solution, in this case, to_numpy without explaining how to recover the column selecting functionality of as_matrix! I am sure there are other ways to select columns, but as_matrix was at least one of them! – Jérémie Jul 31 at 23:50
  • @Jérémie besides the obvious df[[col1, col2']].to_numpy()? Not sure why you think wanting to advertise an updated alternative to a deprecated function warrants a downvote on the answer. – cs95 Aug 1 at 0:31
  • what If some of the columns are of list type. How can I create a flat bumpy array out of this? – Moniba Aug 26 at 4:37
  • @Moniba you may want to explode the list items into separate columns/rows as per your requirement first. – cs95 Aug 26 at 4:48
  • Unless I'm wrong, getting more than one column in the same call gets all the data merged into one big array. Am I missing something? – Andrea Moro Aug 29 at 13:58
127

Note: The .as_matrix() method used in this answer is deprecated. Pandas 0.23.4 warns:

Method .as_matrix will be removed in a future version. Use .values instead.


Pandas has something built in...

numpy_matrix = df.as_matrix()

gives

array([[nan, 0.2, nan],
       [nan, nan, 0.5],
       [nan, 0.2, 0.5],
       [0.1, 0.2, nan],
       [0.1, 0.2, 0.5],
       [0.1, nan, 0.5],
       [0.1, nan, nan]])
  • 30
    This does not give a structured array, all columns are of dtype object. – sebix Oct 9 '14 at 11:24
  • 14
    "Deprecated since version 0.23.0: Use DataFrame.values instead." / "This method is provided for backwards compatibility. Generally, it is recommended to use ‘.values’." - github.com/pandas-dev/pandas/blob/… – David J. May 1 '18 at 7:29
  • 3
    This is now deprecated. From v0.24 onwards, please use to_numpy instead (not .values either). More here. – cs95 Feb 5 at 5:47
  • 1
    "FutureWarning: Method .as_matrix will be removed in a future version. Use .values instead." – Farhad Maleki Feb 8 at 5:52
65

I would just chain the DataFrame.reset_index() and DataFrame.values functions to get the Numpy representation of the dataframe, including the index:

In [8]: df
Out[8]: 
          A         B         C
0 -0.982726  0.150726  0.691625
1  0.617297 -0.471879  0.505547
2  0.417123 -1.356803 -1.013499
3 -0.166363 -0.957758  1.178659
4 -0.164103  0.074516 -0.674325
5 -0.340169 -0.293698  1.231791
6 -1.062825  0.556273  1.508058
7  0.959610  0.247539  0.091333

[8 rows x 3 columns]

In [9]: df.reset_index().values
Out[9]:
array([[ 0.        , -0.98272574,  0.150726  ,  0.69162512],
       [ 1.        ,  0.61729734, -0.47187926,  0.50554728],
       [ 2.        ,  0.4171228 , -1.35680324, -1.01349922],
       [ 3.        , -0.16636303, -0.95775849,  1.17865945],
       [ 4.        , -0.16410334,  0.0745164 , -0.67432474],
       [ 5.        , -0.34016865, -0.29369841,  1.23179064],
       [ 6.        , -1.06282542,  0.55627285,  1.50805754],
       [ 7.        ,  0.95961001,  0.24753911,  0.09133339]])

To get the dtypes we'd need to transform this ndarray into a structured array using view:

In [10]: df.reset_index().values.ravel().view(dtype=[('index', int), ('A', float), ('B', float), ('C', float)])
Out[10]:
array([( 0, -0.98272574,  0.150726  ,  0.69162512),
       ( 1,  0.61729734, -0.47187926,  0.50554728),
       ( 2,  0.4171228 , -1.35680324, -1.01349922),
       ( 3, -0.16636303, -0.95775849,  1.17865945),
       ( 4, -0.16410334,  0.0745164 , -0.67432474),
       ( 5, -0.34016865, -0.29369841,  1.23179064),
       ( 6, -1.06282542,  0.55627285,  1.50805754),
       ( 7,  0.95961001,  0.24753911,  0.09133339),
       dtype=[('index', '<i8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])
  • 3
    the only thing missing in this answer is how to construct the dtype from the data frame so that you can write a generic function – Joseph Garvin Feb 13 '17 at 17:07
31

You can use the to_records method, but have to play around a bit with the dtypes if they are not what you want from the get go. In my case, having copied your DF from a string, the index type is string (represented by an object dtype in pandas):

In [102]: df
Out[102]: 
label    A    B    C
ID                  
1      NaN  0.2  NaN
2      NaN  NaN  0.5
3      NaN  0.2  0.5
4      0.1  0.2  NaN
5      0.1  0.2  0.5
6      0.1  NaN  0.5
7      0.1  NaN  NaN

In [103]: df.index.dtype
Out[103]: dtype('object')
In [104]: df.to_records()
Out[104]: 
rec.array([(1, nan, 0.2, nan), (2, nan, nan, 0.5), (3, nan, 0.2, 0.5),
       (4, 0.1, 0.2, nan), (5, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5), (6, 0.1, nan, 0.5),
       (7, 0.1, nan, nan)], 
      dtype=[('index', '|O8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])
In [106]: df.to_records().dtype
Out[106]: dtype([('index', '|O8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])

Converting the recarray dtype does not work for me, but one can do this in Pandas already:

In [109]: df.index = df.index.astype('i8')
In [111]: df.to_records().view([('ID', '<i8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])
Out[111]:
rec.array([(1, nan, 0.2, nan), (2, nan, nan, 0.5), (3, nan, 0.2, 0.5),
       (4, 0.1, 0.2, nan), (5, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5), (6, 0.1, nan, 0.5),
       (7, 0.1, nan, nan)], 
      dtype=[('ID', '<i8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])

Note that Pandas does not set the name of the index properly (to ID) in the exported record array (a bug?), so we profit from the type conversion to also correct for that.

At the moment Pandas has only 8-byte integers, i8, and floats, f8 (see this issue).

  • 2
    To get the sought-after structured array (which has better performance than a recarray) you just pass the recarray to the np.array constructor. – meteore Nov 2 '12 at 10:19
  • Index name bug: github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/2161 – Wes McKinney Nov 2 '12 at 14:39
  • We just put in a fix for setting the name of the index shown above. – Chang She Nov 2 '12 at 22:23
23
+25

It seems like df.to_records() will work for you. The exact feature you're looking for was requested and to_records pointed to as an alternative.

I tried this out locally using your example, and that call yields something very similar to the output you were looking for:

rec.array([(1, nan, 0.2, nan), (2, nan, nan, 0.5), (3, nan, 0.2, 0.5),
       (4, 0.1, 0.2, nan), (5, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5), (6, 0.1, nan, 0.5),
       (7, 0.1, nan, nan)],
      dtype=[(u'ID', '<i8'), (u'A', '<f8'), (u'B', '<f8'), (u'C', '<f8')])

Note that this is a recarray rather than an array. You could move the result in to regular numpy array by calling its constructor as np.array(df.to_records()).

  • 2
    Wait, what does this answer add compared to the other answer by @meteore which mentioned to_records() over 5 years earlier? – JohnE Oct 11 '18 at 4:55
11

Try this:

a = numpy.asarray(df)
  • Hi! Please add some explanation to your answer. Right now, it is currently being marked as low quality by review due to length and content and is at risk of being deleted by the system. Thanks! – d_kennetz May 28 at 17:31
  • 1
    basically convert the input to an array (as the name suggests). So along with the context of the question, this answer is valid. check docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/… – Lautaro Parada Opazo Sep 4 at 2:58
  • Thanks, I think it's kind of self-explanatory. – Dadu Khan Sep 27 at 15:17
8

Here is my approach to making a structure array from a pandas DataFrame.

Create the data frame

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import six

NaN = float('nan')
ID = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
A = [NaN, NaN, NaN, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1]
B = [0.2, NaN, 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, NaN, NaN]
C = [NaN, 0.5, 0.5, NaN, 0.5, 0.5, NaN]
columns = {'A':A, 'B':B, 'C':C}
df = pd.DataFrame(columns, index=ID)
df.index.name = 'ID'
print(df)

      A    B    C
ID               
1   NaN  0.2  NaN
2   NaN  NaN  0.5
3   NaN  0.2  0.5
4   0.1  0.2  NaN
5   0.1  0.2  0.5
6   0.1  NaN  0.5
7   0.1  NaN  NaN

Define function to make a numpy structure array (not a record array) from a pandas DataFrame.

def df_to_sarray(df):
    """
    Convert a pandas DataFrame object to a numpy structured array.
    This is functionally equivalent to but more efficient than
    np.array(df.to_array())

    :param df: the data frame to convert
    :return: a numpy structured array representation of df
    """

    v = df.values
    cols = df.columns

    if six.PY2:  # python 2 needs .encode() but 3 does not
        types = [(cols[i].encode(), df[k].dtype.type) for (i, k) in enumerate(cols)]
    else:
        types = [(cols[i], df[k].dtype.type) for (i, k) in enumerate(cols)]
    dtype = np.dtype(types)
    z = np.zeros(v.shape[0], dtype)
    for (i, k) in enumerate(z.dtype.names):
        z[k] = v[:, i]
    return z

Use reset_index to make a new data frame that includes the index as part of its data. Convert that data frame to a structure array.

sa = df_to_sarray(df.reset_index())
sa

array([(1L, nan, 0.2, nan), (2L, nan, nan, 0.5), (3L, nan, 0.2, 0.5),
       (4L, 0.1, 0.2, nan), (5L, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5), (6L, 0.1, nan, 0.5),
       (7L, 0.1, nan, nan)], 
      dtype=[('ID', '<i8'), ('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')])

EDIT: Updated df_to_sarray to avoid error calling .encode() with python 3. Thanks to Joseph Garvin and halcyon for their comment and solution.

  • doesn't work for me, error: TypeError: data type not understood – Joseph Garvin Feb 13 '17 at 17:55
  • Thanks for your comment and to halcyon for the correction. I updated my answer so I hope it works for you now. – Phil Jun 23 '17 at 14:30
6

Two ways to convert the data-frame to its Numpy-array representation.

  • mah_np_array = df.as_matrix(columns=None)

  • mah_np_array = df.values

Doc: https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.as_matrix.html

4

A Simpler Way for Example DataFrame:

df

         gbm       nnet        reg
0  12.097439  12.047437  12.100953
1  12.109811  12.070209  12.095288
2  11.720734  11.622139  11.740523
3  11.824557  11.926414  11.926527
4  11.800868  11.727730  11.729737
5  12.490984  12.502440  12.530894

USE:

np.array(df.to_records().view(type=np.matrix))

GET:

array([[(0, 12.097439  , 12.047437, 12.10095324),
        (1, 12.10981081, 12.070209, 12.09528824),
        (2, 11.72073428, 11.622139, 11.74052253),
        (3, 11.82455653, 11.926414, 11.92652727),
        (4, 11.80086775, 11.72773 , 11.72973699),
        (5, 12.49098389, 12.50244 , 12.53089367)]],
dtype=(numpy.record, [('index', '<i8'), ('gbm', '<f8'), ('nnet', '<f4'),
       ('reg', '<f8')]))
4

Just had a similar problem when exporting from dataframe to arcgis table and stumbled on a solution from usgs (https://my.usgs.gov/confluence/display/cdi/pandas.DataFrame+to+ArcGIS+Table). In short your problem has a similar solution:

df

      A    B    C
ID               
1   NaN  0.2  NaN
2   NaN  NaN  0.5
3   NaN  0.2  0.5
4   0.1  0.2  NaN
5   0.1  0.2  0.5
6   0.1  NaN  0.5
7   0.1  NaN  NaN

np_data = np.array(np.rec.fromrecords(df.values))
np_names = df.dtypes.index.tolist()
np_data.dtype.names = tuple([name.encode('UTF8') for name in np_names])

np_data

array([( nan,  0.2,  nan), ( nan,  nan,  0.5), ( nan,  0.2,  0.5),
       ( 0.1,  0.2,  nan), ( 0.1,  0.2,  0.5), ( 0.1,  nan,  0.5),
       ( 0.1,  nan,  nan)], 
      dtype=(numpy.record, [('A', '<f8'), ('B', '<f8'), ('C', '<f8')]))
4

I went through the answers above. The "as_matrix()" method works but its obsolete now. For me, What worked was ".to_numpy()".

This returns a multidimensional array. I'll prefer using this method if you're reading data from excel sheet and you need to access data from any index. Hope this helps :)

2

Further to meteore's answer, I found the code

df.index = df.index.astype('i8')

doesn't work for me. So I put my code here for the convenience of others stuck with this issue.

city_cluster_df = pd.read_csv(text_filepath, encoding='utf-8')
# the field 'city_en' is a string, when converted to Numpy array, it will be an object
city_cluster_arr = city_cluster_df[['city_en','lat','lon','cluster','cluster_filtered']].to_records()
descr=city_cluster_arr.dtype.descr
# change the field 'city_en' to string type (the index for 'city_en' here is 1 because before the field is the row index of dataframe)
descr[1]=(descr[1][0], "S20")
newArr=city_cluster_arr.astype(np.dtype(descr))
0

A simple way to convert dataframe to numpy array:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [1, 2], "B": [3, 4]})
df_to_array = df.to_numpy()
array([[1, 3],
   [2, 4]])

Use of to_numpy is encouraged to preserve consistency.

Reference: https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/reference/api/pandas.DataFrame.to_numpy.html

  • what is the difference between solution provided by Arsam and yours ... – qaiser yesterday
  • Just tried to make it more completely and usable with a code example, which is what I personally prefer. – user1460675 yesterday

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