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Why is it that a function with loops cannot be made inline? Is it due to a performance issue or is there any other reason?

closed as not a real question by user529758, Nawaz, hims056, Anirudh Ramanathan, Mankarse Nov 2 '12 at 6:38

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    "Why a function with loops cannot be made as inline" - That's not true. Where did you hear that from? – Mysticial Nov 2 '12 at 6:21
  • who says it can't? – SomeWittyUsername Nov 2 '12 at 6:22
  • C++, C99, and GNU C each have support for inline functions. Different compilers vary in how complex a function they can manage to inline. Wikipedia – Anirudh Ramanathan Nov 2 '12 at 6:23
  • can you provide an specific example? – Jahmic Nov 2 '12 at 6:23
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    @Aniket Loop unrolling (AFAIK) is a decision made at a much lower level, at a much later stage, so I thought the compiler wouldn't be able to really tell if the loop can/cannot be unrolled. – Anirudh Ramanathan Nov 2 '12 at 6:32
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Functions containing loops may be inlined even if the loops cannot be unrolled. Whoever said otherwise is wrong.

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A function with loops can be made inline, But every time a function is called, there is a certain amount of performance overhead that occurs. This is because the CPU must store the address of the current instruction it is executing (so it knows where to return to later) along with other registers, all the function parameters must be created and assigned values, and the program has to branch to a new location. Iline Code written in-place is significantly faster.

Because of the potential for code bloat, inlining a function is best suited to short functions (eg. no more than a few lines) that are typically called inside loops and do not branch. Also note that the inline key word is only a recommendation — the compiler is free to ignore your request to inline a function. This is likely to be the result if you try to inline a lengthy function!

C++ offers a way to combine the advantages of functions with the speed of code written in-place: inline functions. The inline keyword is used to request that the compiler treat your function as an inline function. When the compiler compiles your code, all inline functions are expanded in-place — that is, the function call is replaced with a copy of the contents of the function itself, which removes the function call overhead! The downside is that because the inline function is expanded in-place for every function call, this can make your compiled code quite a bit larger, especially if the inline function is long and/or there are many calls to the inline function.

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

inline void inlineFunction()
{
    int loopCounter = 0;
     while(loopCounter<5 )
     {
         loopCounter++;
         cout<<"Inline loop "<<loopCounter<<" \n";
     }
}

void regularFunction()
{
    int loopCounter = 0;
     while(loopCounter<5 )
     {
         loopCounter++;
         cout<<"regular  "<<loopCounter<<" \n";
     }
}

int main()
{

    clock_t start;
    clock_t end;
    clock_t duration;

    cout << "Running inline function  ..." << endl;
    start = clock();

     inlineFunction();

    end = clock();
    duration = end - start;
    cout << "Time elapsed: " << duration << " ticks. \n" << endl;

    cout << "Running function  ..." << endl;
    start = clock();

    regularFunction();

    end = clock();
    duration = end - start;
    cout << "Time elapsed: " << duration << " ticks.\n" << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
  • I don't think this proves anything without showing the disassembly. The compiler is free to inline both, or neither of them. – Mysticial Nov 2 '12 at 6:36
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    I think inline keyword only suggests the compiler to inline the function. Does not guarantee it. – Aniket Inge Nov 2 '12 at 6:38
  • What if the loopcounter variable is a function parameter? What if it depends on the program input? Can the function be inlined in such a case? – KjMag Jul 24 '17 at 11:56

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