114

It would be convenient to be able to say something like:

for _, element := reverse range mySlice {
        ...
}
167

No there is no convenient operator for this to add to the range one in place. You'll have to do a normal for loop counting down:

s := []int{5, 4, 3, 2, 1}
for i := len(s)-1; i >= 0; i-- {
   fmt.Println(s[i])
}
4
  • The effective go page an example, but this one is actually a bit nicer and declares fewer variables. Dec 5 '13 at 21:07
  • 3
    IMO Go desperately needs a descending range construct. Not having it causes a good deal of extra work, as we can see.... –
    – Vector
    Mar 30 '14 at 11:56
  • 35
    I wouldn't say desperately, it would be a nice have. May 1 '14 at 19:46
  • 1
    A language shortcoming that forces you to use indices to access elements of an array, for a super common use case, when a solution is easily achievable, is in desperate need of that solution.
    – Oliver
    Jul 12 at 0:41
52

You can also do:

s := []int{5, 4, 3, 2, 1}
for i := range s {
        fmt.Println(s[len(s)-1-i]) // Suggestion: do `last := len(s)-1` before the loop
}

Output:

1
2
3
4
5

Also here: http://play.golang.org/p/l7Z69TV7Vl

16

Variation with index

for k := range s {
        k = len(s) - 1 - k
        // now k starts from the end
    }
7

How about use defer:

s := []int{5, 4, 3, 2, 1}
for i, _ := range s {
   defer fmt.Println(s[i])
}
7
  • 11
    I've up-voted just for the fact it brought some new knowledge about defer but I believe using this inside a loop for reverse is quite tricky and should be pretty ineffective memory-wise. May 6 '16 at 13:40
  • 13
    It "works", but if the loop isn't the last thing in the function you may get unexpected results. Example.
    – Daniel
    Jul 15 '16 at 18:30
  • 7
    This is using defer in a way that it is not intended for. Don't use this since it can have nasty side effects (out of order execution). Just use the for loop in the accepted answer. Go is aiming to minimize this kind of clever (not) hacks since they tend to bite you in the ass later on.
    – RickyA
    Oct 24 '16 at 13:04
  • 6
    This is a hacky use of defer and should be avoided. If this is, for example, a function which someone might extend in future, it may have unintended consequences.
    – Amir Keibi
    Dec 20 '16 at 21:52
  • 6
    This wasn't quite 'iffy' enough, so I went ahead and added channels play.golang.org/p/GodEiv1LlIJ
    – Xeoncross
    Jul 27 '18 at 17:05
5

One could use a channel to reverse a list in a function without duplicating it. It makes the code nicer in my sense.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func reverse(lst []string) chan string {
    ret := make(chan string)
    go func() {
        for i, _ := range lst {
            ret <- lst[len(lst)-1-i]
        }
        close(ret)
    }()
    return ret
}

func main() {
    elms := []string{"a", "b", "c", "d"}
    for e := range reverse(elms) {
        fmt.Println(e)
    }
}
5
  • That looks like a clean and nice-to-use solution to me. Is it possible to generalize this using the type []interface{}? Because the present reverse-function only supports strings. Oct 5 '15 at 6:55
  • For sure, just replace string by interface{} and you are good to Go. I just want to stress that a function with signature func reverse(lst []interface{}) chan inyterface{} will not take a []string as input anymore. Even if string can be casted in interface{}, []string cannot be casted in []interface{}. Unfortunately, the present reverse function is the kind of function that needs to be rewritten a lot.
    – user983716
    Oct 6 '15 at 12:04
  • Thank you. That's the ugly part of go I think - which is somehow unavoidable. Thank you! Oct 7 '15 at 14:24
  • I would implement a stack rather than this. Nov 7 '18 at 20:24
  • This would be especially nice embedded in a type that had these semantics.
    – cdunham
    Jan 25 at 2:51
2

I guess this is the easiest way to reverse arrays.:

package main

import "fmt"

// how can we reverse write the array
func main() {

    arr := [...]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
    revArr := [len(arr)]int{} // making empty array for write reverse

    for i := range arr {
        revArr[len(arr)-1-i] = arr[i]
    }

    fmt.Println(revArr)
}

https://play.golang.org/p/QQhj26-FhtF

0

When I need to extract elements from a slice and reverse range, I use something like this code:

// reverse range
// Go Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/gx6fJIfb7fo
package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Elem struct {
    Id   int64
    Name string
}

type Elems []Elem

func main() {
    mySlice := Elems{{Id: 0, Name: "Alice"}, {Id: 1, Name: "Bob"}, {Id: 2, Name: "Carol"}}
    for i, element := range mySlice {
        fmt.Printf("Normal  range: [%v] %+v\n", i, element)
    }

    //mySlice = Elems{}
    //mySlice = Elems{{Id: 0, Name: "Alice"}}
    if last := len(mySlice) - 1; last >= 0 {
        for i, element := last, mySlice[0]; i >= 0; i-- {
            element = mySlice[i]
            fmt.Printf("Reverse range: [%v] %+v\n", i, element)
        }
    } else {
        fmt.Println("mySlice empty")
    }
}

Output:

Normal  range: [0] {Id:0 Name:Alice}
Normal  range: [1] {Id:1 Name:Bob}
Normal  range: [2] {Id:2 Name:Carol}
Reverse range: [2] {Id:2 Name:Carol}
Reverse range: [1] {Id:1 Name:Bob}
Reverse range: [0] {Id:0 Name:Alice}

Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/gx6fJIfb7fo

0

An elegant method for reverse range:

If your slice is transient: Loop while the number of elements is greater than zero, use the last element, and then remove it. The slice will be empty after the first element has been processed:

s := []int{1, 2, 3, 4}
for len(s) > 0 {
    item := s[len(s)-1]
    fmt.Printf("Reverse item: %+v\n", item)
    s = s[:len(s)-1]
}

Output:

Reverse item: 4
Reverse item: 3
Reverse item: 2
Reverse item: 1

Go Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/XKB43k7M9j3

0

You can use the funk.ForEachRight method from go-funk:

results := []int{}

funk.ForEachRight([]int{1, 2, 3, 4}, func(x int) {
    results = append(results, x)
})

fmt.Println(results) // []int{4, 3, 2, 1}

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