335

How can I display LaTeX code in a IPython Notebook?

4
  • 4
    @duffymo Regardless of how you thing of LaTeX, this is a pretty good question. Take a look at what IPython notebook actually is. Maybe it helps if I tell you that it’s a bit like orgmode on ’roids (but unfortunately without a nice editor, and with Markdown instead of LaTeX, hence OP’s question). Nov 3, 2012 at 11:03
  • 1
    I'm ignorant of it, thanks for the instruction, Konrad.
    – duffymo
    Nov 3, 2012 at 11:11
  • 2
    And, just to be clear, I love LaTeX. (I used it to typeset my dissertation.) No objections; just failed to understand the issue.
    – duffymo
    Nov 3, 2012 at 13:57
  • Like anything in Jupyter it depends whether you want to display Latex in a markdown cell with fixed text (Latex just between $) or a code cell using an instruction like display or print to show a computed text. Answers here target either cell, but not both, except this one which should be the selected answer, but is also more difficult to read due to the whole rainbow of fonts and sizes used.
    – mins
    Apr 9, 2021 at 18:39

15 Answers 15

316

IPython notebook uses MathJax to render LaTeX inside html/markdown. Just put your LaTeX math inside $$.

$$c = \sqrt{a^2 + b^2}$$

sqrt

Or you can display LaTeX / Math output from Python, as seen towards the end of the notebook tour:

from IPython.display import display, Math, Latex
display(Math(r'F(k) = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x) e^{2\pi i k} dx'))

integral

7
  • 22
    I think the OP wants to use LaTeX instead of Markdown, rather than just for equations. I sympathise with the request – much as I like Markdown, for complex documents I’d always use LaTeX. Nov 7, 2012 at 21:15
  • 17
    Gotcha. The best solution for that right now would be to use 'raw' cells instead of markdown, and just type LaTeX as you would. Then use nbconvert to turn the ipynb to TeX (code, figures and all), and run latex to render that to PDF, etc. You don't get live-rendered TeX in the browser like you do with MathJax / Markdown, but you do still have TeX / code in one document.
    – minrk
    Nov 8, 2012 at 21:29
  • 1
    same question but in qtconsole Jul 10, 2013 at 23:08
  • 10
    and use single $ (rather than double $$) to keep the equation in-line. stackoverflow.com/q/19412644/1224255 Dec 29, 2014 at 18:45
  • 6
    You can also render an entire cell as LaTeX by typing %%latex as the first line in a text cell. Feb 23, 2017 at 12:01
176

This came up in a search I was just doing, found a better solution with some more searching, IPython notebooks now have a %%latex magic that makes the whole cell Latex without the $$ wrapper for each line.

Refer notebook tour for Rich Display System

2
  • 42
    In Jupyter, it doesn't work in a markdown cell but it does work in a code cell.
    – jwe
    Oct 14, 2015 at 18:16
  • 3
    Now is working on Jupiter. I put %%latex in a cell, and import the from IPython.display import Latex. After that, the Jupyter notebook recognizes Latex notation. Jun 28, 2020 at 3:42
92

LaTeX References:

Udacity's Blog has the Best LaTeX Primer I've seen: It clearly shows how to use LaTeX commands in easy to read, and easy to remember manner !! Highly recommended.

This Link has Excellent Examples showing both the code, and the rendered result !
You can use this site to quickly learn how to write LaTeX by example.

And, here is a quick Reference for LaTeX commands/symbols.


To Summarize: various ways to indicate LaTeX in Jupyter/IPython:

Examples for Markdown Cells:

inline, wrap in: $

The equation used depends on whether the the value of  
$V​max​​$ is R, G, or B.  

block, wrap in: $$

$$H←  ​​​​​0 ​+​ \frac{​​30(G−B)​​}{Vmax−Vmin}  ​​, if V​max​​ = R$$

block, wrap in: \begin{equation} and \end{equation}

\begin{equation}
H← ​​​60 ​+​ \frac{​​30(B−R)​​}{Vmax−Vmin}  ​​, if V​max​​ = G
\end{equation}

block, wrap in: \begin{align} and \end{align}

\begin{align}
H←120 ​+​ \frac{​​30(R−G)​​}{Vmax−Vmin}  ​​, if V​max​​ = B
\end{align}

Examples for Code Cells:

LaTex Cell: %%latex magic command turns the entire cell into a LaTeX Cell

%%latex
\begin{align}
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0
\end{align}

Math object to pass in a raw LaTeX string:

from IPython.display import Math
Math(r'F(k) = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x) e^{2\pi i k} dx')

Latex class. Note: you have to include the delimiters yourself. This allows you to use other LaTeX modes such as eqnarray:

from IPython.display import Latex
Latex(r"""\begin{eqnarray}
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{B}} -\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{E}}}{\partial t} & = \frac{4\pi}{c}\vec{\mathbf{j}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0 
\end{eqnarray}""")

Docs for Raw Cells:

(sorry, no example here, just the docs)

Raw cells Raw cells provide a place in which you can write output directly. Raw cells are not evaluated by the notebook. When passed through nbconvert, raw cells arrive in the destination format unmodified. For example, this allows you to type full LaTeX into a raw cell, which will only be rendered by LaTeX after conversion by nbconvert.

Additional Documentation:

For Markdown Cells, as quoted from Jupyter Notebook docs:

Within Markdown cells, you can also include mathematics in a straightforward way, using standard LaTeX notation: $...$ for inline mathematics and $$...$$ for displayed mathematics. When the Markdown cell is executed, the LaTeX portions are automatically rendered in the HTML output as equations with high quality typography. This is made possible by MathJax, which supports a large subset of LaTeX functionality

Standard mathematics environments defined by LaTeX and AMS-LaTeX (the amsmath package) also work, such as \begin{equation}...\end{equation}, and \begin{align}...\end{align}. New LaTeX macros may be defined using standard methods, such as \newcommand, by placing them anywhere between math delimiters in a Markdown cell. These definitions are then available throughout the rest of the IPython session.

2
  • 1
    The link to the Udacity page does not work any more.
    – Galaxy
    Sep 19, 2019 at 5:34
  • Hmm. I am on debian. I tried to apt-get install maple-latext, pip instal latext with a import latex and still the %%latex in a code cell failed to render latex code. 8-(
    – netskink
    Feb 14 at 20:32
36

Use $$ if you want your math to appear in a single line, e.g.,

$$a = b + c$$ (line break after the equation)

If you don't need a line break after the math, use single dollar sign $, e.g.,

$a = b + c$   (no line break after the equation)
24

You can choose a cell to be markdown, then write latex code which gets interpreted by mathjax, as one of the responders say above.

Alternatively, Latex section of the iPython notebook tutorial explains this well.

You can either do:

from IPython.display import Latex
Latex(r"""\begin{eqnarray}
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{B}} -\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{E}}}{\partial t} & = \frac{4\pi}{c}\vec{\mathbf{j}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0 
\end{eqnarray}""")

or do this:

%%latex
\begin{align}
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{B}} -\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{E}}}{\partial t} & = \frac{4\pi}{c}\vec{\mathbf{j}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0
\end{align}

More info found in this link

2
15

I developed prettyPy, which offers a nice way to print equation. Unfortunately, it's not performant and needs testing.

Example:

enter image description here

Granted, sympy is a great alternative and although prettyPy doesn't allow for evaluating expressions, variable initialization is not required.

2
  • 2
    All I meant was to imply that I developed the package. I adjusted my answer to explicitly state this.
    – Charles
    Jul 2, 2019 at 17:55
  • 1
    Kudos for putting code in public domain. I will delete my (now) obsolete comment.
    – Robino
    Jul 3, 2019 at 13:22
11

Since, I was not able to use all the latex commands in Code even after using the %%latex keyword or the $..$ limiter, I installed the nbextensions through which I could use the latex commands in Markdown. After following the instructions here: https://github.com/ipython-contrib/IPython-notebook-extensions/blob/master/README.md and then restarting the Jupyter and then localhost:8888/nbextensions and then activating "Latex Environment for Jupyter", I could run many Latex commands. Examples are here: https://rawgit.com/jfbercher/latex_envs/master/doc/latex_env_doc.html

\section{First section}
\textbf{Hello}
$
\begin{equation} 
c = \sqrt{a^2 + b^2}
\end{equation}
$
\begin{itemize}
\item First item
\item Second item
\end{itemize}
\textbf{World}

As you see, I am still unable to use usepackage. But maybe it will be improved in the future.

enter image description here

1
  • 2
    The latex_envs notebook extension cannot use external LaTeX packages or styles; It doesn't include a compiler but simply recognizes some keywords, structures and makes appropriate html substitutions. Thanks for using it. It is much more easy to install the ipython-contrib notebook extensions now using pip.
    – jfb
    May 6, 2016 at 14:01
11

I wrote how to write LaTeX in Jupyter Notebook in this article.

You need to enclose them in dollar($) signs.

  • To align to the left use a single dollar($) sign.

$P(A)=\frac{n(A)}{n(U)}$

  • To align to the center use double dollar($$) signs.

$$P(A)=\frac{n(A)}{n(U)}$$

  • Use \limits for \lim, \sum and \int to add limits to the top and the bottom of each sign.

  • Use a backslash to escape LaTeX special words such as Math symbols, Latin words, text, etc.

enter image description here

Try this one.

$$\overline{x}=\frac{\sum \limits _{i=1} ^k f_i x_i}{n} \text{, where } n=\sum \limits _{i=1} ^k f_i  $$
  • Matrices

enter image description here

  • Piecewise functions
$$
\begin{align}
\text{Probability density function:}\\
\begin{cases}
\frac{1}{b-a}&\text{for $x\in[a,b]$}\\
0&\text{otherwise}\\
\end{cases}
\\
\text{Cumulative distribution function:}\\
\begin{cases}
0&\text{for $x<a$}\\
\frac{x-a}{b-a}&\text{for $x\in[a,b)$}\\
1&\text{for $x\ge b$}\\
\end{cases}
\end{align}
$$

The above code will create this.

enter image description here

If you want to know how to add numbering to equations and align equations, please read this article for details.

9

The answer given by minrk (included for completeness) is good, but there is another way that I like even more.

You can also render an entire cell as LaTeX by typing %%latex as the first line in a text cell. This is usefull if you

  • want more control,
  • want more than just a math environment,
  • or if you are going to write a lot of math in one cell.

minrk's answer:


IPython notebook uses MathJax to render LaTeX inside html/markdown. Just put your LaTeX math inside $$.

$$c = \sqrt{a^2 + b^2}$$

sqrt

Or you can display LaTeX / Math output from Python, as seen towards the end of the notebook tour:

from IPython.display import display, Math, Latex
display(Math(r'F(k) = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x) e^{2\pi i k} dx'))

integral

5

If your main objective is doing math, SymPy provides an excellent approach to functional latex expressions that look great.

3

Using LaTeX syntax directly in a Markdown cell works for me. I'm using Jypiter 4.4.0.

I don't have to use %%latex magic command, I insist, simply a markdown cell:

\begin{align}
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{B}} -\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{E}}}{\partial t} & = \frac{4\pi}{c}\vec{\mathbf{j}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
\nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
\nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0
\end{align}

Renders to:

enter image description here

1
  • 2
    This is indeed the easiest and cleanest way to do it.
    – Veliko
    Jun 25, 2019 at 10:58
1

I came across this problem some day using colab. And I find the most painless way is just running this code before printing. Everything works like charm then.

from IPython.display import Math, HTML

def load_mathjax_in_cell_output():
  display(HTML("<script src='https://www.gstatic.com/external_hosted/"
               "mathjax/latest/MathJax.js?config=default'></script>"))
get_ipython().events.register('pre_run_cell', load_mathjax_in_cell_output)
import sympy as sp
sp.init_printing()

The result looks like this:

enter image description here

1

I am using Jupyter Notebooks. I had to write

%%latex
$sin(x)/x$

to get a LaTex font.

1
  • 1
    This works when you are in the coding mode. If you are in the Markdown mode then you can get rid of %%latex Sep 14, 2019 at 9:52
1

Yet another solution for when you want to have control over the document preamble. Write a whole document, send it to system latex, convert the pdf to png, use IPython.display to load and display.

import tempfile
import os.path
import subprocess
from IPython.display import Image, display

with tempfile.TemporaryDirectory(prefix="texinpy_") as tmpdir:
    path = os.path.join(tmpdir, "document.tex")
    with open(path, 'w') as fp:
        fp.write(r"""
        \documentclass[12pt]{standalone}
        \begin{document}
        \LaTeX{}
        \end{document}
        """)
    subprocess.run(["lualatex", path], cwd=tmpdir)
    subprocess.run(["pdftocairo", "-singlefile", "-transp", "-r", "100", "-png", "document.pdf", "document"], cwd=tmpdir)
    im = Image(filename=os.path.join(tmpdir, "document.png"))
    display(im)

enter image description here

0

If you want to display a LaTeX equation from a notebook code cell you can create a simple wrapper class that makes use of the Jupyter notebooks rich display representation. This class should have a _repr_latex_ method (note this single underscore at the start and end rather than the double underscores of other special methods) that outputs the LaTeX string. E.g.:

class LaTeXEquation:
    def __init__(self, eqntext):
        self.eqntext = eqntext

    def __repr__(self):
        return repr(self.eqntext)

    def _repr_latex_(self):
        """
        Special method for rich display of LaTeX formula.
        """

        # add $'s at start and end if not present
        if self.eqntext.strip()[0] != "$" and self.eqntext.strip()[-1] != "$":
            return "$" + self.eqntext + "$"
        else:
            return self.eqntext

myeqn = "x = y^2"

Then in a code cell, if you do, e.g.,

LaTeXEquation(myeqn)

it will show the formatted equation.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.