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Just as a counterpoint to this question: what is an interface in Java?

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13 Answers 13

59

An interface is a special form of an abstract class which does not implement any methods. In Java, you create an interface like this:

interface Interface
{
    void interfaceMethod();
}

Since the interface can't implement any methods, it's implied that the entire thing, including all the methods, are both public and abstract (abstract in Java terms means "not implemented by this class"). So the interface above is identical to the interface below:

public interface Interface
{
    abstract public void interfaceMethod();
}

To use this interface, you simply need to implement the interface. Many classes can implement an interface, and a class can implement many interfaces:

interface InterfaceA
{
     void interfaceMethodA();
}

interface InterfaceB
{
    void interfaceMethodB();
}

public class ImplementingClassA
    implements InterfaceA, InterfaceB
{
    public void interfaceMethodA()
    {
        System.out.println("interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation A");
    }

    public void interfaceMethodB()
    {
        System.out.println("interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation A");
    }
}

public class ImplementingClassB
    implements InterfaceA, InterfaceB
{
    public void interfaceMethodA()
    {
         System.out.println("interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation B");
    }

    public void interfaceMethodB()
    {
        System.out.println("interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation B");
    }
}

Now if you wanted you could write a method like this:

public void testInterfaces()
{
    ImplementingClassA u = new ImplementingClassA();
    ImplementingClassB v = new ImplementingClassB();
    InterfaceA w = new ImplementingClassA();
    InterfaceA x = new ImplementingClassB();
    InterfaceB y = new ImplementingClassA();
    InterfaceB z = new ImplementingClassB();

    u.interfaceMethodA();
    // prints "interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation A"
    u.interfaceMethodB();
    // prints "interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation A"
    v.interfaceMethodA();
    // prints "interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation B"
    v.interfaceMethodB();
    // prints "interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation B"
    w.interfaceMethodA();
    // prints "interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation A"
    x.interfaceMethodA();
    // prints "interfaceA, interfaceMethodA, implementation B"
    y.interfaceMethodB();
    // prints "interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation A"
    z.interfaceMethodB();
    // prints "interfaceB, interfaceMethodB, implementation B"
}

However, you could never do the following:

public void testInterfaces()
{
    InterfaceA y = new ImplementingClassA();
    InterfaceB z = new ImplementingClassB();

    y.interfaceMethodB(); // ERROR!
    z.interfaceMethodA(); // ERROR!
}

The reason you can't do this is that y is of type interfaceA, and there is no interfaceMethodB() in interfaceA. Likewise, z is of type interfaceB and there is no interfaceMethodA() in interfaceB.

I mentioned earlier that interfaces are just a special form of an abstract class. To illustrate that point, look at the following code.

interface Interface
{
    void abstractMethod();
}

abstract public class AbstractClass
{
    abstract public void abstractMethod();
}

You would inherit from these classes almost exactly the same way:

public class InheritsFromInterface
    implements Interface
{
    public void abstractMethod() { System.out.println("abstractMethod()"); }
}

public class InteritsFromAbstractClass
    extends AbstractClass
{
    public void abstractMethod() { System.out.println("abstractMethod()"); }
}

In fact, you could even change the interface and the abstract class like this:

interface Interface
{
    void abstractMethod();
}

abstract public class AbstractClass
    implements Interface
{
    abstract public void abstractMethod();
}

public class InheritsFromInterfaceAndAbstractClass
    extends AbstractClass implements Interface
{
    public void abstractMethod() { System.out.println("abstractMethod()"); }
}

However, there are two differences between interfaces and abstract classes.

The first difference is that interfaces cannot implement methods.

interface Interface
{
    public void implementedMethod()
    {
        System.out.println("implementedMethod()");
    }
}

The interface above generates a compiler error because it has an implementation for implementedMethod(). If you wanted to implement the method but not be able to instantiate the class, you would have to do it like this:

abstract public class AbstractClass
{
    public void implementedMethod()
    {
        System.out.println("implementedMethod()");
    }
}

That's not much of an abstract class because none of its members are abstract, but it is legal Java.

The other difference between interfaces and abstract classes is that a class can inherit from multiple interfaces, but can only inherit from one abstract class.

abstract public class AbstractClassA { }
abstract public class AbstractClassB { }
public class InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses
    extends AbstractClassA, AbstractClassB
{ }

The code above generates a compiler error, not because the classes are all empty, but because InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses is trying to inherit from two abstract classes, which is illegal. The following is perfectly legal.

interface InterfaceA { }
interface InterfaceB { }
public class InheritsFromTwoInterfaces
    implements InterfaceA, InterfaceB
{ }    

The first difference between interfaces and abstract classes is the reason for the second difference. Take a look at the following code.

interface InterfaceA
{
    void method();
}

interface InterfaceB
{
    void method();
}

public class InheritsFromTwoInterfaces
    implements InterfaceA, InterfaceB
{
    void method() { System.out.println("method()"); }
}

There's no problem with the code above because InterfaceA and InterfaceB don't have anything to hide. It's easy to tell that a call to method will print "method()".

Now look at the following code:

abstract public class AbstractClassA
{
    void method() { System.out.println("Hello"); }
}

abstract public class AbstractClassB
{
    void method() { System.out.println("Goodbye"); }
}

public class InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses
    extends AbstractClassA, AbstractClassB
{ }

This is exactly the same as our other example, except that because we're allowed to implement methods in abstract classes, we did, and because we don't have to implement already-implemented methods in an inheriting class, we didn't. But you may have noticed, there's a problem. What happens when we call new InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses().method()? Does it print "Hello" or "Goodbye"? You probably don't know, and neither does the Java compiler. Another language, C++ allowed this kind of inheritance and they resolved these issues in ways that were often very complicated. To avoid this kind of trouble, Java decided to make this "multiple inheritance" illegal.

The downside to Java's solution that the following can't be done:

abstract public class AbstractClassA
{
    void hi() { System.out.println("Hello"); }
}

abstract public class AbstractClassB
{
    void bye() { System.out.println("Goodbye"); }
}

public class InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses
    extends AbstractClassA, AbstractClassB
{ }

AbstractClassA and AbstractClassB are "mixins" or classes that aren't intended to be instantiated but add functionality to the classes that they are "mixed into" through inheritance. There's obviously no problem figuring out what happens if you call new InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses().hi() or new InheritsFromTwoAbstractClasses().bye(), but you can't do that because Java doesn't allow it.

(I know this is a long post, so if there are any mistakes in it please let me know and I will correct them.)

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  • 5
    One small remark, you call your class "InheritsFromTwoInterfaces", but when you use interfaces you are usually not speaking about Inheriting, but Implementing, this because the interface does not contain any logic and/or implementation you can inherit. Therefore it is better to speak about implementation (at least that is they learned me). – Gertjan Aug 24 '09 at 8:40
  • 2
    @Gertjan You are correct. However, I don't think the distinction between "inherits" and "implements" is all that important, especially considering that in many cases one both inherits and implements an abstract class. I chose to keep the naming scheme to be less confusing. – Imagist Aug 24 '09 at 8:50
  • interface is like a pipe through which you can access to different classes of objects in a standardized way. Since in Java you cannot extend more than one class, interface is here to satisfy need for more complex inheritance. – ante.sabo Aug 24 '09 at 9:16
  • No, interfaces are not used for inheritance. Interfaces are just "contracts" that define the functions and members an class must have when implementing the interface. Interfaces cannot be used to work around the "extend issue" (which does not allow you to extend 2 or more classes). when extending a class the functionality of the class you extend is still accessible (through the extending class), but since an interface has no functionality you cannot use it to ommit the multiple inheritance restriction because members and functions need to be written in the implementing class. – Gertjan Aug 24 '09 at 10:09
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Interface is a contract. A simple example is a Tenant and Landlord which are the two parties and the contract is the Rent Agreement. Rent Agreement contains various clause which Tenants have to follow. Likewise Interface is a contact which contains various method (Declaration) which the Party has to implement (provide method bodies).Here party one is the class which implement the interface and second party is Client and the way to use and interface is having “Reference of Interface” and “Object of Implementing class”: below are 3 components:(Explained with help of example)

Component 1] Interface : The Contract

interface myInterface{

 public void myMethod();

 }

Component 2] Implementing Class : Party number 1

 class myClass implements myInterface {

 @Override

 public void myMethod() {

 System.out.println("in MyMethod");

 }

 }

Component 3] Client code : Party number 2

 Client.java

 public class Client {

 public static void main(String[] args) {

 myInterface mi = new myClass();

 // Reference of Interface = Object of Implementing Class

 mi.myMethod(); // this will print in MyMethod

 }

 }
1

Interface : System requirement service.

Description : Suppose a client needed some functionality "i.e. JDBC API" interface and some other server Apache , Jetty , WebServer they all provide implements of this. So it bounded requirement document which service provider provided to the user who uses data-connection with these server Apache , Jetty , WebServer .

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An interface in java is a blueprint of a class. It has static constants and abstract methods only.The interface in java is a mechanism to achieve fully abstraction. There can be only abstract methods in the java interface not method body. It is used to achieve fully abstraction and multiple inheritance in Java. An interface is a collection of abstract methods. A class implements an interface, thereby inheriting the abstract methods of the interface. An interface is not a class. Writing an interface is similar to writing a class, but they are two different concepts. A class describes the attributes and behaviors of an object. An interface contains behaviors(Abstract Methods) that a class implements. Unless the class that implements the interface is abstract, all the methods of the interface need to be defined in the class.Since multiple inheritance is not allowed in java so interface is only way to implement multiple inheritance. Here is an example for understanding interface

interface Printable{  
void print();  
}  

interface Showable{  
void print();  
}  

class testinterface1 implements Printable,Showable{  

public void print(){System.out.println("Hello");}  

public static void main(String args[]){  
testinterface1 obj = new testinterface1();  
obj.print();  
 }  
}
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Interface is the blueprint of an class.

There is one oop's concept called Data abstraction under that there are two categories one is abstract class and other one is interface.

Abstract class achieves only partial abstraction but interface achieves full abstraction.

In interface there is only abstract methods and final variables..you can extends any number of interface and you can implement any number of classes.

If any class is implementing the interface then the class must implements the abstract methods too

Interface cannot be instantiated.

interface A() {
    void print()
}
0

This question is 6 years old and lot of things have changed the definition of interface over the years.

From oracle documentation page ( post Java 8 release) :

In the Java programming language, an interface is a reference type, similar to a class, that can contain only constants, method signatures, default methods, static methods, and nested types. Method bodies exist only for default methods and static methods. Interfaces cannot be instantiated—they can only be implemented by classes or extended by other interfaces.

Have a look at related SE questions for better explanation:

Is there more to an interface than having the correct methods

What is the difference between an interface and abstract class?

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What it is
An interface is a reference type, just like a class is. These are the two main reference types in Java.

What it contains
An interface can contain a subset of what a normal class can contain. This includes everything that is static, both methods and variables, and non-static method declarations. It is not allowed to have non-static variables.
A declaration of a method differs from a normal method in several things; here is one as an example:

[public] [abstract] ReturnType methodName();

These declarations can be marked as public and abstract, as represented with [optional braces]. It is not necessary to do so, as it is the default. private, protected, package-private (aka. nothing) and the final modifier are not allowed and marked as a compiler error. They have not implementation, so there is a semicolon instead of curly braces.

As of Java 8, they can hold non-static methods with an implementation, these have to be marked with the default modifier. However, the same restrictions as to the other modifiers apply (adding that strictfp is now valid and abstract is no more).

What it's useful for
One of its uses is for it to be used as a face for a service. When two parties work together to form a service-requester & service-provider kind of relationship, the service provider provides the face of the service (as to what the service looks like) in the form of an interface.
One of the OOP concept is "Abstraction" which means to hide away complex working of the systems and show only what is necessary to understand the system. This helps in visualizing the working of a complex system. This can be achieved through interface where in each module is visualized (and also implemented) to work through interface of another module

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An interface is a class-like construct that contains only constants and abstract methods (Introduction to java programming, n.d.). Moreover, it can extend more than one interface for example a Superclass. Java allows only single inheritance for class extension but allows multiple extensions for interfaces(Introduction to Java programming, n.d.) For example,

public class NewClass extends BaseClass
implements Interface1, ..., InterfaceN {
    ...
}

Secondly, interfaces can be used to specify the behavior of objects in a class. However, they cannot contain abstract methods. Also, an interface can inherit other interfaces using the extends keyword.

public interface NewInterface extends Interface1, ... , InterfaceN {

}

Reference

Introduction to Java Programming. Interfaces and Abstract classes (n.d). Retrieved March 10, 2017 from https://viewer.gcu.edu/7NNUKW

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  • Be sure to use formatting options to be clear where you have code, and when explanations: code using ` and blocks ``` – unmultimedio Mar 10 '17 at 18:59
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In general, we prefer interfaces when there are two are more implementations we have. Where Interface is acts as protocol.

Coding to interface, not implementations Coding to interface makes loosely couple.

An interface is a reference type in Java. It is similar to class. It is a collection of abstract methods. A class implements an interface, thereby inheriting the abstract methods of the interface. Along with abstract methods, an interface may also contain constants, default methods, static methods, and nested types. for more details

0

From the latest definition by Oracle, Interface is:

There are a number of situations in software engineering when it is important for disparate groups of programmers to agree to a "contract" that spells out how their software interacts. Each group should be able to write their code without any knowledge of how the other group's code is written. Generally speaking, interfaces are such contracts.

For example, imagine a futuristic society where computer-controlled robotic cars transport passengers through city streets without a human operator. Automobile manufacturers write software (Java, of course) that operates the automobile—stop, start, accelerate, turn left, and so forth. Another industrial group, electronic guidance instrument manufacturers, make computer systems that receive GPS (Global Positioning System) position data and wireless transmission of traffic conditions and use that information to drive the car.

The auto manufacturers must publish an industry-standard interface that spells out in detail what methods can be invoked to make the car move (any car, from any manufacturer). The guidance manufacturers can then write software that invokes the methods described in the interface to command the car. Neither industrial group needs to know how the other group's software is implemented. In fact, each group considers its software highly proprietary and reserves the right to modify it at any time, as long as it continues to adhere to the published interface.

[...] An interface is a reference type, similar to a class, that can contain only constants, method signatures, default methods, static methods, and nested types. Method bodies exist only for default methods and static methods. Interfaces cannot be instantiated—they can only be implemented by classes or extended by other interfaces.

The most popular usage of interfaces is as APIs (Application Programming Interface) which are common in commercial software products. Typically, a company sells a software package that contains complex methods that another company wants to use in its own software product.

An example could be a package of digital image processing methods that are sold to companies making end-user graphics programs.

The image processing company writes its classes to implement an interface, which it makes public to its customers. The graphics company then invokes the image processing methods using the signatures and return types defined in the interface. While the image processing company's API is made public (to its customers), its implementation of the API is kept as a closely guarded secret—in fact, it may revise the implementation at a later date as long as it continues to implement the original interface that its customers have relied on.

Check out to learn more about interfaces.

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In addition to what others have mentioned and by illogical comparison it's a frame work for wrapping methods so they can be stored in variables.

Thus on the fly you can equate the interface variable to be equal to any method or collection of methods atleast in this sense, a good reason you would usually want to do that is to escape repetitive logic that will definitely be an enemy of progress within the half life of your code at any decaying rate, be careful with the scenario below user discretion is advised.

SCENARIO

You have a game with a drawSillyThings() method in a SoulAvenger class, that has to draw some frames or sprites. Now drawSillyThings() has a list of other methods it needs to call in other to draw a metamorphed glorified-soul-ranger after user kills the grim-reaper in level 5k, i.e. drawSillyThings() needs to call either of inviteTheGrimReaper(), drawUpperCut(), drawTotalKO(), drawVictoryAndGlorifiedRanger(), drawDefeatAndMockery(), drawFightRecap() and drawGameOver() whenever the right situations arise during the gaming experience but all these would result in unwanted logic in drawSillyThings() which might slow the game i.e.

public static class SoulAvenger{

        public SoulAvenger(){
             //constructor logic
        }

        private void loadLevel5k(){...}

        private void dontAllowUserWinOnTime(){...}

        private void loadGrimReaperFight(){...}

        private void drawSillyThings(){
            ... //unaccounted game logic
            while(fighting_in_level_5k){
                while(soul_ranger_has_enough_lives){
                    if(game_state=fight)inviteTheGrimReaper();
                    else if(game_state=medium_blows)drawUpperCut();
                    else if(game_state=heavy_blows)drawTotalKO();
                    else if(game_state=lost)drawDefeatAndMockery();
                    else if(game_state=won)drawVictoryAndGlorifiedRanger();
                    else if(game_state=end)drawFightRecap();
                }else drawGameOver();
            }
        }
}

The problem here is the loop-nested boolean checks that have to be performed each time while the soul-ranger is still alive where as you could just have an alternative class which makes sure drawSillyThings() doesn’t need a game_state to be checked each time in order to call the right method but to do that you ‘ld need to kinda store the right method in a variable so that subsequently you can kinda variable = new method and also kinda variable.invoke(). If that wasn’t something have a look

public static class InterfaceTest{

    public interface Method{
        public void invoke();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        //lets create and store a method in a variable shall we
        Method method_variable=new Method(){
            @Override
            public void invoke(){
                //do something        
            }
        };

        //lets call or invoke the method from the variable in order to do something
        method_variable.invoke();

        //lets change the method to do something else
        method_variable=new Method(){
            @Override
            public void invoke(){
                //do something else       
            }
        };

        //lets do something else
        method_variable.invoke();            

     }

}

This was probably what the guys at oracle had discovered was missing from Java several years before rumors of some developers planning a massive protest surfaced on the web but back to the SoulAvenger, as the gameplay occurs you would definitely just want to kinda have a variable be equated to give the right method to be invoked in drawSillyThings() in order to run things in a silly manner therefore

public static class SoulAvenger{

    private interface SillyRunner{
        public void run_things();
    }

    ...//soul avenging variables
    private SillyRunner silly_runner;

    public SoulAvenger(int game_state){
        //logic check is performed once instead of multiple times in a nested loop
        if(game_state=medium_blows){
            silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
                @Override
                public void run_things(){
                    drawUpperCut();
                }
            };
        }else if(game_state=heavy_blows){
            silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
                @Override
                public void run_things(){
                    drawTotalKO();
                }
            };
        }else if(game_state=lost){
            silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
                @Override
                public void run_things(){
                    drawDefeatAndMockery();
                }
            };
        }else if(game_state=won){
            silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
                @Override
                public void run_things(){
                    drawVictoryAndGlorifiedRanger();
                }
            };
        }else if(game_state=fight){
            silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
                @Override
                public void run_things(){
                    drawFightRecap();
                }
            };

        }

    }

    private void loadLevel5k(){
        //an event triggered method to change how you run things to load level 5k
        silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
            @Override
            public void run_things(){
                //level 5k logic
            }
        };
    }

    private void dontAllowUserWinOnTime(){
        //an event triggered method to help user get annoyed and addicted to the game
        silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
            @Override
            public void run_things(){
                drawDefeatAndMockery();
            }
        };
    }

    private void loadGrimReaperFight(){
        //an event triggered method to send an invitation to the nearest grim-reaper
        silly_runner=new SillyRunner(){
            @Override
            public void run_things(){
                inviteTheGrimReaper();
            }
        };
    }

    private void drawSillyThings(){
        ...//unaccounted game logic
        while(fighting_in_level_5k){
            while(soul_ranger_has_enough_lives){
                silly_runner.run_things();
            }
        }
    }

}

Now the drawSillyThings() doesn’t need to perform any if logic while drawing because as the right events gets triggered the silly_runner gets equated to have its run_things() method invoke a different method thus using a variable to store and invoke a method kinda-ish although in the real gaming world(I actually mean in a console) several threads will work asynchronously to change interface variables to run different piece of code with the same call.

0

An interface in java is a special type of Abstract class, the Interface provided the 100% Abstraction but since the java introduce new features in java 8 the meaning of whole Interface is change. Interfaces are used to tell what should be done. But due to new features now we give implementations of methods in Interface, that changed the meaning of Interface. In Interface the method is public abstract by default

interface Bird{
        void sound();
         void eat();
        }

Java doesn't provide the multiple inheritances feature mean a class doesn't have two parents, but we extend multiple Interfaces in java.

0

An interface is a contract between the system and the external environment. More specifically to Java - a contract for a class (for a specific behavior), implemented in a form that resembles a pure abstract class.

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