45

How do I create an empty mutable two dimensional array in Rust?

This is what I have tried so far:

let mut state[[u8 * 4] * 4];

This produces the error

error: expected one of `:`, `;`, `=`, or `@`, found `[`
 --> src/main.rs:2:18
  |
2 |     let mut state[[u8 * 4] * 4];
  |                  ^ expected one of `:`, `;`, `=`, or `@` here

10 Answers 10

18

Editor's note: This answer predates Rust 1.0 and some of the concepts and syntax have changed. Other answers apply to Rust 1.0.

Do you want the contents of the array to be mutable or the variable that holds it? If you want mutable contents, does this work for you?

let state = [mut [mut 0u8, ..4], ..4];

If you want the variable to be mutable but not the contents, try this:

let mut state = [[0u8, ..4], ..4];

Does this help? I didn't actually compile this, so the syntax might be slightly off.

6
  • Yes. This works. Do you know how would I pass such array to the function? The function needs to change values of array. Thanks. – php-- Nov 5 '12 at 20:27
  • 3
    You could pass the value in two ways. One option would be &mut [[u8 * 4] * 4]--- pointer to a two-dimensional fixed length array. You would just do &mut state to get such a pointer. – Niko Matsakis Nov 6 '12 at 21:05
  • 2
    Oh, and normally having a mutable variable like this would also allow you to mutate the elements of a fixed-length array, as they are owned by the variable. Unfortunately this bug <github.com/mozilla/rust/issues/3226> will prevent you for now. – Niko Matsakis Nov 6 '12 at 21:06
  • @NikoMatsakis Thanks. I got it working like this & [mut [mut u8 * 4] * 4] for function parameter. How can I get pointer to first row of two dimensional array? – php-- Nov 7 '12 at 19:20
  • 3
    For future visitors: this is for a pre-1.0 version of rust, there's another answer below with an updated syntax. let mut state = [[0u8; 4]; 4];. – daboross May 21 '17 at 7:10
58

In Rust 1.0, the following works:

let mut state = [[0u8; 4]; 6];
state[0][1] = 42;

Note that the length of the interior segment is an integral part of the type. For example, you can reference (and pass) state as follows:

let a: &[[u8; 4]] = &state;

but not without specifying the fixed length of the sub-array. If you need variable length sub-arrays you may need to do something like this:

let x: [Box<[u8]>; 3] = [
    Box::new([1, 2, 3]),
    Box::new([4]), 
    Box::new([5, 6])
];
let y: &[Box<[u8]>] = &x;
3
  • Note that this panics if you access out of bounds. Which doesn't feel very rust-like. – Andy Hayden Sep 11 '16 at 22:26
  • Thanks hardy, but "(and, yes, the mutability works now)" -> how would you access and mutate one element ? – Antonin Oct 5 '17 at 22:20
  • @AndyHayden in the two years since your comment was posted bounds checking must have been properly implemented, as I receive compile time errors when attempting out-of-bounds access on both the outer and inner arrays. – markasoftware Dec 11 '18 at 1:34
14

You can create a dynamically-sized 2D vector like this:

fn example(width: usize, height: usize) {
    // Base 1d array
    let mut grid_raw = vec![0; width * height];

    // Vector of 'width' elements slices
    let mut grid_base: Vec<_> = grid_raw.as_mut_slice().chunks_mut(width).collect();

    // Final 2d array `&mut [&mut [_]]`
    let grid = grid_base.as_mut_slice();

    // Accessing data
    grid[0][0] = 4;
}
1
  • 2
    I think it should read ...chunks_mut(height)... assuming access is grid[0...width-1][0...height-1] – Michael Barker Dec 9 '18 at 5:50
12

You can also create a 2D array like this (using Vec) if you don't have a known size at compile time:

let width = 4;
let height = 4;

let mut array = vec![vec![0; width]; height];

Use it like this:

array[2][2] = 5;

println!("{:?}", array);

Output:

0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 5 0
0 0 0 0

Available since rust 1.0.0 https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/vec/struct.Vec.html

2
  • 3
    This method has a problem: instead of idiomatic C arrays this code creates an array (Vec) of pointers (other Vec's) to different locations in the heap. It can cost you a significant performance loss on some array operations. – totikom Jun 7 '20 at 15:13
  • Agree, it should be used when the size is not known at compile time. The memory is dynamically allocated on the heap. – Yuchen Zhong Jun 28 '20 at 18:36
8

Initialization:
There are several approaches for 2D Array initialization:

  1. Using constants for M (rows) & N (columns)

    const M: usize = 2;
    const N: usize = 4;
    
    let mut grid = [[0 as u8; N] ; M];
    
  2. Explicit declaration with type annotations

    let mut grid: [[u8; 4]; 2] = [[0; 4]; 2];
    

Traversing:
The read-only traversing is as easy as:

for (i, row) in grid.iter().enumerate() {
    for (j, col) in row.iter().enumerate() {
        print!("{}", col);
    }
    println!()
}

or

for el in grid.iter().flat_map(|r| r.iter()) {
    println!("{}", el);
}

Updating element(s):

for (i, row) in grid.iter_mut().enumerate() {
    for (j, col) in row.iter_mut().enumerate() {
        col = 1;
    }
}
3

If you are open to installing a crate, the ndarray can gracefully do it for you.

use ndarray::Array2;
let mut array = Array2::zeros((4, 3));
array[[1, 1]] = 7;

With some of the already existing answers, it is not possible to create an array using non-constant dimensions. There is no such problems with ndarray. You can also effortlessly create dimensions of more than 2 dimenions.

You can find more details here and here

2

Idiomatic C 2-dimensional arrays are declared using the same order of array sizes as used when accessing the array:

// Declaration
int array_2d[8][16]; // An 8 by 16 2D array
...
// Access
array_2d[0][1] = 5;

In Rust, the declaration sizes are flipped; to create an 8 by 16 2-dimensional array, the syntax is:

// Declaration
let mut array_2d: [[i32; 16]; 8];
...
// Access (same as idiomatic C. types for added explicitness)
array_2d[0_usize][1_usize] = 5;
1

Well the question of how to create a vector is properly addressed above, here the code snippet to create 2d vector and then fill it with user input

use std::io;

fn main(){

    let width = 4;
    let height = 4;
    
    let mut array = vec![vec![0; width]; height];

    for i in 0..4 { 
        let mut xstr = String::from("");
        io::stdin().read_line(&mut xstr).ok().expect("read error");
        array[i] = xstr.split_whitespace().map(|s| s.parse().expect("parse error")).collect();
    }

    println!("{:?}",array)

}

1

Another example of 2D string array:

fn main() {
    let width = 2;
    let height = 3;

    let mut a: Vec<Vec<String>> = vec![vec![String::from(""); width]; height];

    for i in 0..height {
        for j in 0..width {
            let s = format!("{}:{}", i + 1, j + 1);
            a[i][j] = s;
        }
    }
    println!("{:?}", a);
}

Output:

[
  ["1:1", "1:2"], 
  ["2:1", "2:2"], 
  ["3:1", "3:2"]
]

But not sure why cannot use this form: a = [[String::from(""), 2], 3] don't understand what's difference between vec![] and []

0

with explicit initialization

let directions: [[i32; 2]; 4] = [[-1, 0], [0, 1], [0, 1], [1, 0]]

with same value

let directions: [[i32; 2]; 4] = [[0; 2]; 4];

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