1

Possible Duplicate:
Pure virtual destructor in C++

class A{
    public:
        virtual ~A()=0;
};

class B:public A{
        int *i;
    public:
        ~B() {delete i;}
};

int main(){
    B* temp = new B;
}

I'm just trying to have B be an implementation of A. For some reason I cannot do this.

marked as duplicate by CrazyCasta, BЈовић, Bo Persson, Rob, Kevin Gosse Nov 4 '12 at 12:01

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  • 2
    what is the relationship between B and S? – billz Nov 4 '12 at 2:37
  • oh sorry, forgot to change that. – user1202422 Nov 4 '12 at 2:38
  • 1
    Note that right now, your B::~B has undefined behavior -- it deletes i, but i was never initialized. – Jerry Coffin Nov 4 '12 at 2:40
  • You aren't dynamically allocating i anywhere, so the delete i; will crash. – j_random_hacker Nov 4 '12 at 2:41
  • What do you mean "For some reason I cannot do this"? What happens when you try? What do you expect to happen instead? Where is the code where you attempt to use B? – Karl Knechtel Nov 4 '12 at 2:44
3

In C++ destructor can be pure virtual:

class A{
    public:
        virtual ~A()=0;
};

But in every case it needs to be implemented:

inline A::~A() {} 

Otherwise A is not usable class. I mean destruction of derived (S/B) is not possible. And possibility of destruction is needed in this line:

  B* temp = new B;

because in case of throwed exception - compiler will automatically destructs temp...

  • Provide inline empty implementation of your virtual destructor in header file. There is no other way. Otherwise destruction of derived (S/B) is not possible. – PiotrNycz Nov 4 '12 at 2:43
  • thanks adding that line fixed my program. – user1202422 Nov 4 '12 at 2:48
  • I don't think the line with B actually can invoke any destructor, since if new throws it does so before completing the construction of B (actually before even starting it; it fails to get the raw memory), so the destructor B::~B will not be called. But this (a line calling for the construction of a B) is as good a place as can be found for the compiler to warn you about the impossibility to destruct a B; either you will do that ultimately, or you've got a memory leak. – Marc van Leeuwen Jul 23 '14 at 12:37
  • @MarcvanLeeuwen An exception can be thrown from inside of B::B() after constructing its A part. So compiler needs to have access to implementation of A::~A()... I mean B::~B() : A(), i(new int(13)) {} In case of bad_alloc for new int(13) - A::~A() will be invoked... – PiotrNycz Jul 23 '14 at 14:57
  • @PiotrNycz: You are right, I overlooked that possibility. (And you meant B::B() where you wrote B::~B(); I'm sure you would never dream of calling new from a destructor.) – Marc van Leeuwen Jul 23 '14 at 16:13
1

According to your comment "Yeah i want A to basically be just a container class. Do not want any implementation of A". Your class B shall protected/private inherited from A instead of public inherite. virtual ~A() is allowed to be pure but you still need to provide implementation to ~A().

class A{
public:
  virtual ~A() = 0
  {
    cout << "~A"<<endl;
  }
};

class B : private /*protected*/ A{
  int *i;
public:
  B() : A(){
    i = new int;
  }
  ~B() {
    delete i;
  }
};

int main(){
    B* temp = new B;
    delete temp;
    return 0;
} 

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