6

I am new to CUDA. I am trying to parallelize the following code. Right now it's sitting on kernel but is not using threads at all, thus slow. I tried to use this answer but to no avail so far.

The kernel is supposed to generate first n prime numbers, put them into device_primes array and this array is later accessed from host. The code is correct and works fine in serial version but I need to speed it up, perhaps with use of shared memory.

//CUDA kernel code
__global__ void generatePrimes(int* device_primes, int n) 
{
//int i = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
//int j = blockIdx.y * blockDim.y + threadIdx.y;

int counter = 0;
int c = 0;

for (int num = 2; counter < n; num++)
{       
    for (c = 2; c <= num - 1; c++)
    { 
        if (num % c == 0) //not prime
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    if (c == num) //prime
    {
        device_primes[counter] = num;
        counter++;
    }
}
}

My current, preliminary, and definitely wrong attempt to parallelize this looks like the following:

//CUDA kernel code
__global__ void generatePrimes(int* device_primes, int n) 
{
int i = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
int j = blockIdx.y * blockDim.y + threadIdx.y;
int num = i + 2; 
int c = j + 2;
int counter = 0;

if ((counter >= n) || (c > num - 1))
{
    return;
}
if (num % c == 0) //not prime
{

}
if (c == num) //prime
{
    device_primes[counter] = num;
    counter++;
}
num++;
c++;
}

But this code populates the array with data that does not make sense. In addition, many values are zeroes. Thanks in advance for any help, it's appreciated.

  • 1
    lots of questions. Is this homework? What's the largest n that you want to be able to handle? Do you know any algorithms to compute prime numbers in parallel? Do you know any algorithms to compute prime numbers without knowing all the previous primes? (btw your serial example can be sped up significantly simply by testing against all the previous primes, instead of all the previous integers). At least you made an attempt. However what's the point of having an if clause with nothing that gets executed if the condition is true or false (your //not prime case)? – Robert Crovella Nov 4 '12 at 3:45
  • Yes, it is. I don't know any parallel algos for prime generation, this is why I am here ;) There is absolutely no point in that if statement, you are correct. Thanks for the speeding up comment. I will definitely do that, I suppose, but right now just want this to work in parallel, then I will move on to optimizing. – Nikita K Nov 4 '12 at 3:58
  • As for the largest n - right now the program crashes after about 1200-1400. I really don't care much, I guess 1000 is enough. I suppose hardware limitations start kicking in for larger n's. Also, I'm using 256 threads per block to make sure all CUDA-compatible cards can run it. – Nikita K Nov 4 '12 at 4:03
  • Did you test my suggestions?. I have tried with the first 10k prime numbers and it work. – dreamcrash Nov 5 '12 at 1:03
  • Thanks, works fine now, at least up to certain number of primes. Glad someone explained me the basics, with regards to threads executing in parallel. I can now use this as a reference code for further work. I will move one to optimization now, trying to make it exe faster, using your advice. The only issue that I have still bothering me somewhat is that the NVIDIA driver crashes somewhere between 1700 and 1800, so when I supply 1700, program prints first 1700 primes, as expected. When I supply 1800, it prints primes starting from 1031 (which is suspiciously close to 1024). – Nikita K Nov 5 '12 at 2:32
4

You have some problems in your code, for example:

int num = i + 2;

Giving the thread 0 the interaction 2, thread 1 the iteration 3 and so on. The problem is that the next iteration that threads will compute is based on num++;. So this means that thread 0 will execute next the iteration 3 already done by thread 1. Therefore you will have redundant computation. Furthermore, i think for this problem it will be easier to use only one dimension instead using 2 (x,y). So basing in this assumption, you have to change num++ for:

num += blockDim.x * gridDim.x;

Another issue is that you did not take in consideration that variable counter has to be shared among threads. Otherwise, each threads will try to find 'n' primes, and all of them will populate the entire array. So you have to change int counter = 0; for an shared or global variable, we will use global variable so it will be visible among all threads from all blocks. We can use the position zero of the array device_primes to hold the counter.

Plus, you have to initialize this value, you will give this job to only one thread. Lets give this job to thread with id = 0, so:

if (thread_id == 0) device_primes[0] = 1;

But since this variable is global and will be writing by all threads you must guarantee that all threads, before writing on it, will see that counter is 1 (first position of device_primes with primes, the zero is for the counter) so you have to add also a barrier in the end, so:

if (thread_id == 0) device_primes[0] = 1;
__syncthreads()

So a posible solution (an inefficient one):

__global__ void getPrimes(int *device_primes,int n)
{ 
    int c = 0;
    int thread_id = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    int num = thread_id;

    if (thread_id == 0) device_primes[0] = 1;
    __syncthreads();

    while(device_primes[0] < n)
    {

        for (c = 2; c <= num - 1; c++)
        { 
            if (num % c == 0) //not prime
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        if (c == num) //prime
        {
            int pos = atomicAdd(&device_primes[0],1);
            device_primes[pos] = num;

        }

        num += blockDim.x * gridDim.x; // Next number for this thread       
    }
}

The following line atomicAdd(&device_primes[0],1); will basically do device_primes[0]++; But since counter is global you have to guarantee mutual exclusion. That is why i used this atomic operation. Note, that you may have to compile with the flag -arch sm_20.

Optimization: In terms of code, it will be preferable an approach with less/no synchronization. Also you can reduce the number of computation by taking in consideration some of the proprieties of the prime numbers as you can see in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes.

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