32

I am calling a function on button click like this:

<input type="button" onclick="outer();" value="ACTION">​

function outer() { 
    alert("hi");       
}

It works fine and I get an alert:

Now when I do like this:

function outer() { 
    function inner() {
        alert("hi");
    }
}

Why don't I get an alert?

Though inner function has a scope available in outer function.

  • 1
    Where do you try to call inner? – Bergi Nov 4 '12 at 12:47
40

The scoping is correct as you've noted. However, you are not calling the inner function anywhere.

You can do either:

function outer() { 

    // when you define it this way, the inner function will be accessible only from 
    // inside the outer function

    function inner() {
        alert("hi");
    }
    inner(); // call it
}

Or

function outer() { 
    this.inner = function() {
        alert("hi");
    }
}

<input type="button" onclick="(new outer()).inner();" value="ACTION">​
  • 2
    btw what is that piece called onclick="(new outer()).inner();", I am seeing it for the first time – Mike Nov 4 '12 at 12:58
  • 2
    @Mike: Better forget it, it's not really suited for this. He is creating a new instance of the outer constructor and calls a method on it – Bergi Nov 4 '12 at 13:25
  • @Mike - In case you need inner() accessible outside outer(), the second way will let you. But you do not need the second way for your requirement here. – techfoobar Nov 4 '12 at 13:27
37

You could make it into a module and expose your inner function by returning it in an Object.

function outer() { 
    function inner() {
        console.log("hi");
    }
    return {
        inner: inner
    };
}
var foo = outer();
foo.inner();
  • 1
    Thanks sir! Searched so long for a solution like this. – Eyk Rehbein Nov 4 '17 at 18:08
  • 2
    The first part of the marked answer is the correct answer for this particular question, but Google brought me here and this is actually what I was looking for, searching: "javascript access a function inside a function." I'm guessing that's why this has so many up-votes even though it's wrong for the question. – JoePC Mar 16 '18 at 15:30
6

You are not calling the function inner, just defining it.

function outer() { 
    function inner() {
        alert("hi");
    }

    inner(); //Call the inner function

}
3

You can also try this.Here you are returning the function "inside" and invoking with the second set of parenthesis.

function outer() {
  return (function inside(){
    console.log("Inside inside function");
  });
}
outer()();

Or

function outer2() {
    let inside = function inside(){
      console.log("Inside inside");
    };
    return inside;
  }
outer2()();

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