20

I would like to horizontally sum the components of a __m256 vector using AVX instructions. In SSE I could use

_mm_hadd_ps(xmm,xmm);
_mm_hadd_ps(xmm,xmm);

to get the result at the first component of the vector, but this does not scale with the 256 bit version of the function (_mm256_hadd_ps).

What is the best way to compute the horizontal sum of a __m256 vector?

4
  • 1
    use sse to compute horizontal sum of the lower part; shuffle YMM high / low parts, use sse again and sum up the two scalars. or wait for avx2. Nov 4, 2012 at 14:25
  • 1
    Is this inside a loop or is it just a one-off operation ?
    – Paul R
    Nov 4, 2012 at 15:19
  • It's inside an outer loop where there is another inner loop.
    – Yoav
    Nov 4, 2012 at 15:57
  • 1
    See also this 128b SSE answer for more optimal (lower latency, fewer uops) alternatives to haddps after you've done the vextractf128 / addps step. Feb 17, 2016 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

18

This version should be optimal for both Intel Sandy/Ivy Bridge and AMD Bulldozer, and later CPUs.

// x = ( x7, x6, x5, x4, x3, x2, x1, x0 )
float sum8(__m256 x) {
    // hiQuad = ( x7, x6, x5, x4 )
    const __m128 hiQuad = _mm256_extractf128_ps(x, 1);
    // loQuad = ( x3, x2, x1, x0 )
    const __m128 loQuad = _mm256_castps256_ps128(x);
    // sumQuad = ( x3 + x7, x2 + x6, x1 + x5, x0 + x4 )
    const __m128 sumQuad = _mm_add_ps(loQuad, hiQuad);
    // loDual = ( -, -, x1 + x5, x0 + x4 )
    const __m128 loDual = sumQuad;
    // hiDual = ( -, -, x3 + x7, x2 + x6 )
    const __m128 hiDual = _mm_movehl_ps(sumQuad, sumQuad);
    // sumDual = ( -, -, x1 + x3 + x5 + x7, x0 + x2 + x4 + x6 )
    const __m128 sumDual = _mm_add_ps(loDual, hiDual);
    // lo = ( -, -, -, x0 + x2 + x4 + x6 )
    const __m128 lo = sumDual;
    // hi = ( -, -, -, x1 + x3 + x5 + x7 )
    const __m128 hi = _mm_shuffle_ps(sumDual, sumDual, 0x1);
    // sum = ( -, -, -, x0 + x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 + x6 + x7 )
    const __m128 sum = _mm_add_ss(lo, hi);
    return _mm_cvtss_f32(sum);
}

haddps is not efficient on any CPU; the best you can do is one shuffle (to extract the high half) and one add, repeat until one element left. Narrowing to 128-bit as the first step benefits AMD before Zen2, and is not a bad thing anywhere.

See Fastest way to do horizontal SSE vector sum on x86 for more details about efficiency.

5
  • There are some weird corner cases (when performance is decode-bound) where using haddps instead would confer a benefit, but generally this is very reasonable. Nov 5, 2012 at 1:46
  • On Bulldozer haddps is microcoded. Moreover, it will generate 3 macrooperations, while the code above uses only 2 for partial reduction. Nov 5, 2012 at 13:56
  • 2
    which is why I said "weird corner cases" (they are very rare, and truly weird). Nov 5, 2012 at 14:09
  • 1
    Doesn't the use of SSE instructions (like _mm_movehl_ps) with 256bit AVX instructions incur a state change penalty?
    – timbo
    Nov 14, 2015 at 23:34
  • 1
    SSE instructions do cause state change penalty, but if you compile for AVX instruction sets, _mm_movehl_ps and the likes would generate AVX forms of the instructions (VMOVHLPS in this particular case). Nov 15, 2015 at 3:09
7

This can be done with the following code:

ymm2 = _mm256_permute2f128_ps(ymm , ymm , 1);
ymm = _mm256_add_ps(ymm, ymm2);
ymm = _mm256_hadd_ps(ymm, ymm);
ymm = _mm256_hadd_ps(ymm, ymm);

but there might be a better solution.

1
  • 2
    I noticed that the permute + add can also come after the two hadds. Apr 4, 2019 at 23:21

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