7
        var sample = new
        {
            Time = DateTime.Now,
            Name = "Hello"
        };
        Trace.TraceInformation("{0}", sample);

outputs as

ProcessInvocation86.exe Information: 0 : { Time = 04.11.2012 22:07:52, Name = Hello }

I'd like different formatting in my application. Is there a way to change the implementation of ToString() for anonymous objects in C#? Maybe some static field per AppDomain or something?

  • 1
    Probably not for anonymous types. When you start moving from a simple data structure to a slightly richer object which exposes functionality (such as overriding a method), you'll need to define an explicit type. – David Nov 4 '12 at 20:21
  • 1
    I managed to do this: var sample = new { Time = DateTime.Now, Name = "Hello", ToString = new Func<string>(() => { return"xxx"; })};Console.WriteLine("{0}", sample.ToString());. Unfortunatelly it seems there is no way to access this from ToString Func, so it can return only constants or global variables - useless I guess :( – Ondra Nov 5 '12 at 16:08
7

No, you can't do this - ToString, Equals, and GetHashCode have default implementation provided by framework. To override this functionality you should inherit from your anonymous type, which is impossible.

Use String.Format to get desired output.

  • 3
    I'll add that if you need this kind of functionality, then you should define a real class and extend it accordingly. – Jonathon Reinhart Nov 4 '12 at 20:20
4

As far as im aware, there is no way to override the default ToString behaviour.
Might be worthwhile looking at some of the posts from Eric Lippert about anonymous types: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/anonymous+types/

Probably best to create a simple class for this purpose:

e.g.

public class MyClass
{
  public DateTime Time { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public override string ToString()
  {
    return string.Format("Time = {0}. Name = {1}.", Time, Name);
  }
}
1

I know, some guys will actually punch me for such a solution and I agree, that you shouldn't use it in production. If you have specific functionality for some bunch of data - this should definitely go to separate class. But for minor issues, you can use a little of reflection like this to write some custom formatter (I repeat, I'm not suggesting to use it in production ):

private string FormatProperties<T> (T obj)
{
    string result = "";
    var type = typeof(T);
    foreach (var prop in type.GetProperties())
    {
        result += string.Format("{0}:{1}\r\n", prop.Name, prop.GetValue(obj));
    }
    return result;
}

Then the call

var anon = new {Name = "Ilya", Surname = "Ivanov"};
Console.WriteLine (FormatProperties(anon));

Will result in printed

Name:Ilya
Surname:Ivanov

And then you can cache types for performance benefits and get into another types of troubles.

0

this isn't exactly ideal.. but you could create an extension method that takes a function that does the formatting.

Following example formatted for LinqPad EXAMPLE

void Main()
{
var sample = new
        {
            Time = DateTime.Now,
            Name = "Hello",
        };

    sample.ToAnonString(()=>sample.Name).Dump();

}
public static class ovs{
       public static string ToAnonString(this object o,Func<string> exp){
         return exp();
       }
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.