28

Folks,

is there a collection of gotchas where Numpy differs from python, points that have puzzled and cost time ?

"The horror of that moment I shall never never forget !"
"You will, though," the Queen said, "if you don't make a memorandum of it."

For example, NaNs are always trouble, anywhere. If you can explain this without running it, give yourself a point --

from numpy import array, NaN, isnan

pynan = float("nan")
print pynan is pynan, pynan is NaN, NaN is NaN
a = (0, pynan)
print a, a[1] is pynan, any([aa is pynan for aa in a])

a = array(( 0, NaN ))
print a, a[1] is NaN, isnan( a[1] )

(I'm not knocking numpy, lots of good work there, just think a FAQ or Wiki of gotchas would be useful.)

Edit: I was hoping to collect half a dozen gotchas (surprises for people learning Numpy).
Then, if there are common gotchas or, better, common explanations, we could talk about adding them to a community Wiki (where ?) It doesn't look like we have enough so far.

2
  • 5
    should be community wiki Aug 24, 2009 at 13:41
  • 1
    No one mentioned primitive types. Does this mean a python float is equivalent to a np.float and so on?
    – user67416
    Feb 23, 2011 at 15:46

15 Answers 15

25

Because __eq__ does not return a bool, using numpy arrays in any kind of containers prevents equality testing without a container-specific work around.

Example:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.array(range(3))
>>> b = numpy.array(range(3))
>>> a == b
array([ True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)
>>> x = (a, 'banana')
>>> y = (b, 'banana')
>>> x == y
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all()

This is a horrible problem. For example, you cannot write unittests for containers which use TestCase.assertEqual() and must instead write custom comparison functions. Suppose we write a work-around function special_eq_for_numpy_and_tuples. Now we can do this in a unittest:

x = (array1, 'deserialized')
y = (array2, 'deserialized')
self.failUnless( special_eq_for_numpy_and_tuples(x, y) )

Now we must do this for every container type we might use to store numpy arrays. Furthermore, __eq__ might return a bool rather than an array of bools:

>>> a = numpy.array(range(3))
>>> b = numpy.array(range(5))
>>> a == b
False

Now each of our container-specific equality comparison functions must also handle that special case.

Maybe we can patch over this wart with a subclass?

>>> class SaneEqualityArray (numpy.ndarray):
...   def __eq__(self, other):
...     return isinstance(other, SaneEqualityArray) and self.shape == other.shape and (numpy.ndarray.__eq__(self, other)).all()
... 
>>> a = SaneEqualityArray( (2, 3) )
>>> a.fill(7)
>>> b = SaneEqualityArray( (2, 3) )
>>> b.fill(7)
>>> a == b
True
>>> x = (a, 'banana')
>>> y = (b, 'banana')
>>> x == y
True
>>> c = SaneEqualityArray( (7, 7) )
>>> c.fill(7)
>>> a == c
False

That seems to do the right thing. The class should also explicitly export elementwise comparison, since that is often useful.

22

The biggest gotcha for me was that almost every standard operator is overloaded to distribute across the array.

Define a list and an array

>>> l = range(10)
>>> l
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.array(l)
>>> a
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

Multiplication duplicates the python list, but distributes over the numpy array

>>> l * 2
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> a * 2
array([ 0,  2,  4,  6,  8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18])

Addition and division are not defined on python lists

>>> l + 2
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "int") to list
>>> a + 2
array([ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11])
>>> l / 2.0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: 'list' and 'float'
>>> a / 2.0
array([ 0. ,  0.5,  1. ,  1.5,  2. ,  2.5,  3. ,  3.5,  4. ,  4.5])

Numpy overloads to treat lists like arrays sometimes

>>> a + a
array([ 0,  2,  4,  6,  8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18])
>>> a + l
array([ 0,  2,  4,  6,  8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18])
2
  • 2
    Yes, that got me too. A simple table with columns: op, python, numpy would settle that.
    – denis
    Aug 25, 2009 at 12:17
  • 2
    Actually a + a is defined for lists. It concatenates them. Nov 8, 2011 at 22:16
22

I think this one is funny:

>>> import numpy as n
>>> a = n.array([[1,2],[3,4]])
>>> a[1], a[0] = a[0], a[1]
>>> a
array([[1, 2],
       [1, 2]])

For Python lists on the other hand this works as intended:

>>> b = [[1,2],[3,4]]
>>> b[1], b[0] = b[0], b[1]
>>> b
[[3, 4], [1, 2]]

Funny side note: numpy itself had a bug in the shuffle function, because it used that notation :-) (see here).

The reason is that in the first case we are dealing with views of the array, so the values are overwritten in-place.

1
  • 2
    Could you explain how the numpy array ends up being so?
    – Sundar R
    Sep 7, 2009 at 14:48
12

NaN is not a singleton like None, so you can't really use the is check on it. What makes it a bit tricky is that NaN == NaN is False as IEEE-754 requires. That's why you need to use the numpy.isnan() function to check if a float is not a number. Or the standard library math.isnan() if you're using Python 2.6+.

1
  • 3
    Well it's in the definition of NaN. def isnan(x): return (x != x) Aug 24, 2009 at 15:31
7

Slicing creates views, not copies.

>>> l = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> s = l[2:3]
>>> s[0] = 5
>>> l
[1, 2, 3, 4]

>>> a = array([1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> s = a[2:3]
>>> s[0] = 5
>>> a
array([1, 2, 5, 4])
1
6
In [1]: bool([])
Out[1]: False

In [2]: bool(array([]))
Out[2]: False

In [3]: bool([0])
Out[3]: True

In [4]: bool(array([0]))
Out[4]: False

So don't test for the emptiness of an array by checking its truth value. Use size(array()).

And don't use len(array()), either:

In [1]: size(array([]))
Out[1]: 0

In [2]: len(array([]))
Out[2]: 0

In [3]: size(array([0]))
Out[3]: 1

In [4]: len(array([0]))
Out[4]: 1

In [5]: size(array(0))
Out[5]: 1

In [6]: len(array(0))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-6-5b2872696128> in <module>()
----> 1 len(array(0))

TypeError: len() of unsized object
3
  • You suggest to use size(array(.)), so how about using len(array(.))?
    – jolvi
    Jan 29, 2015 at 20:18
  • 1
    No, len is different from size. size(array(0)) → 1 because a 0-rank array has one value in it, while len(array(0)) raises an exception len() of unsized object
    – endolith
    Jan 29, 2015 at 21:24
  • Looks like another gotcha then. What is the reasoning why array(0) should be a valid construct?
    – jolvi
    Jan 30, 2015 at 11:57
6

The truth value of a Numpy array differs from that of a python sequence type, where any non-empty sequence is true.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> l = [0,1,2,3]
>>> a = np.arange(4)
>>> if l: print "Im true"
... 
Im true
>>> if a: print "Im true"
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use
a.any() or a.all()
>>>

The numerical types are true when they are non-zero and as a collection of numbers, the numpy array inherits this definition. But with a collection of numbers, truth could reasonably mean "all elements are non-zero" or "at least one element is non-zero". Numpy refuses to guess which definition is meant and raises the above exception. Using the .any() and .all() methods allows one to specify which meaning of true is meant.

>>> if a.any(): print "Im true"
... 
Im true
>>> if a.all(): print "Im true"
... 
>>>
5

(Related, but a NumPy vs. SciPy gotcha, rather than NumPy vs Python)


Slicing beyond an array's real size works differently:

>>> import numpy, scipy.sparse

>>> m = numpy.random.rand(2, 5) # create a 2x5 dense matrix
>>> print m[:3, :] # works like list slicing in Python: clips to real size
[[ 0.12245393  0.20642799  0.98128601  0.06102106  0.74091038]
[ 0.0527411   0.9131837   0.6475907   0.27900378  0.22396443]]

>>> s = scipy.sparse.lil_matrix(m) # same for csr_matrix and other sparse formats
>>> print s[:3, :] # doesn't clip!
IndexError: row index out of bounds

So when slicing scipy.sparse arrays, you must make manually sure your slice bounds are within range. This differs from how both NumPy and plain Python work.

3
print pynan is pynan, pynan is NaN, NaN is NaN

This tests identity, that is if it is the same object. The result should therefore obviously be True, False, True, because when you do float(whatever) you are creating a new float object.

a = (0, pynan)
print a, a[1] is pynan, any([aa is pynan for aa in a])

I don't know what it is that you find surprising with this.

a = array(( 0, NaN ))
print a, a[1] is NaN, isnan( a[1] )

This I did have to run. :-) When you stick NaN into an array it's converted into a numpy.float64 object, which is why a[1] is NaN fails.

This all seems fairly unsurprising to me. But then I don't really know anything much about NumPy. :-)

3

No one seems to have mentioned this so far:

>>> all(False for i in range(3))
False
>>> from numpy import all
>>> all(False for i in range(3))
True
>>> any(False for i in range(3))
False
>>> from numpy import any
>>> any(False for i in range(3))
True

numpy's any and all don't play nicely with generators, and don't raise any error warning you that they don't.

2

from Neil Martinsen-Burrell in numpy-discussion 7 Sept --

The ndarray type available in Numpy is not conceptually an extension of Python's iterables. If you'd like to help other Numpy users with this issue, you can edit the documentation in the online documentation editor at numpy-docs

2

I found the fact that multiplying up lists of elements just creates view of elements caught me out.

>>> a=[0]*5
>>>a
[0,0,0,0,0]
>>>a[2] = 1
>>>a
[0,0,1,0,0]
>>>b = [np.ones(3)]*5
>>>b
[array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.])]
>>>b[2][1] = 2
>>>b
[array([ 1.,  2.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  2.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  2.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  2.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  2.,  1.])]

So if you create a list of elements like this and intend to do different operations on them you are scuppered ...

A straightforward solution is to iteratively create each of the arrays (using a 'for loop' or list comprehension) or use a higher dimensional array (where e.g. each of these 1D arrays is a row in your 2D array, which is generally faster).

4
  • This looks like a pure python gotcha, entirely unrelated to numpy.
    – jolvi
    Jan 28, 2015 at 1:48
  • jolvi ... look a little closer ... try this with range(3) instead of np.ones(3) ... that's the subtlety by which is is a numpy gotcha. its an intentional behavior as it generally makes code faster and can be worked around.
    – sillyMunky
    Feb 4, 2015 at 18:54
  • [range(3)] * 5 evaluates to [range(0, 3), range(0, 3), range(0, 3), range(0, 3), range(0, 3)]. If I do a = [list(range(3))] * 5; a[0][0] = 33 I see exactly the same as in the numpy case: 5 references to one single list instance with first element set to 33, like the one single numpy.array instance as you did.
    – jolvi
    Feb 5, 2015 at 19:13
  • The operation [whatever] * 5 is, AFAICS, entirely unrelated to whatever is, and entirely unrelated to numpy. It produces 5 references to the very same object. If you change the object you will see the change in all 5 references.
    – jolvi
    Feb 5, 2015 at 19:42
2

Not such a big gotcha: With boolean slicing, I sometimes wish I could do

  x[ 3 <= y < 7 ]

like the python double comparison. Instead, I have to write

  x[ np.logical_and(3<=y, y<7) ]

(Unless you know something better?)

Also, np.logical_and and np.logical_or only take two arguments each, I would like them to take a variable number, or a list, so I could feed in more than just two logical clauses.

(numpy 1.3, maybe this has all changed in later versions.)

1
  • What about x[(3<=y) & (y<7)] ?
    – mdaoust
    Mar 29, 2014 at 11:06
2

A surprise with the *= assignment in combination with numpy.array:

>>> from numpy import array

>>> a = array([1, 2, 3])
>>> a *= 1.1  
>>> print(a) 
[1 2 3]  # not quite what we expect or would like to see

>>> print(a.dtype)
int64  # and this is why

>>> a = 1.1 * a  # here, a new array is created
>>> print(a, a.dtype)
[ 1.1  2.2  3.3] float64  # with the expected outcome

Surprising, annoying, but understandable. The *= operator will not change the type of the array data, thereby multiplication of an int array by a float will fail in the conventional meaning of this multiplication. The Python version a = 1; a *= 1.1 in the other hand works as expected.

1

A 0-d array of None looks like None but it is not the same:

In [1]: print None
None

In [2]: import numpy

In [3]: print numpy.array(None)
None

In [4]: numpy.array(None) is None
Out[4]: False

In [5]: numpy.array(None) == None
Out[5]: False

In [6]: print repr(numpy.array(None))
array(None, dtype=object)

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