72

If I have a integer number n, how can I find the next number k > n such that k = 2^i, with some i element of N by bitwise shifting or logic.

Example: If I have n = 123, how can I find k = 128, which is a power of two, and not 124 which is only divisible by two. This should be simple, but it eludes me.

17 Answers 17

94

For 32-bit integers, this is a simple and straightforward route:

unsigned int n;

n--;
n |= n >> 1;   // Divide by 2^k for consecutive doublings of k up to 32,
n |= n >> 2;   // and then or the results.
n |= n >> 4;
n |= n >> 8;
n |= n >> 16;
n++;           // The result is a number of 1 bits equal to the number
               // of bits in the original number, plus 1. That's the
               // next highest power of 2.

Here's a more concrete example. Let's take the number 221, which is 11011101 in binary:

n--;           // 1101 1101 --> 1101 1100
n |= n >> 1;   // 1101 1100 | 0110 1110 = 1111 1110
n |= n >> 2;   // 1111 1110 | 0011 1111 = 1111 1111
n |= n >> 4;   // ...
n |= n >> 8;
n |= n >> 16;  // 1111 1111 | 1111 1111 = 1111 1111
n++;           // 1111 1111 --> 1 0000 0000

There's one bit in the ninth position, which represents 2^8, or 256, which is indeed the next largest power of 2. Each of the shifts overlaps all of the existing 1 bits in the number with some of the previously untouched zeroes, eventually producing a number of 1 bits equal to the number of bits in the original number. Adding one to that value produces a new power of 2.

Another example; we'll use 131, which is 10000011 in binary:

n--;           // 1000 0011 --> 1000 0010
n |= n >> 1;   // 1000 0010 | 0100 0001 = 1100 0011
n |= n >> 2;   // 1100 0011 | 0011 0000 = 1111 0011
n |= n >> 4;   // 1111 0011 | 0000 1111 = 1111 1111
n |= n >> 8;   // ... (At this point all bits are 1, so further bitwise-or
n |= n >> 16;  //      operations produce no effect.)
n++;           // 1111 1111 --> 1 0000 0000

And indeed, 256 is the next highest power of 2 from 131.

If the number of bits used to represent the integer is itself a power of 2, you can continue to extend this technique efficiently and indefinitely (for example, add a n >> 32 line for 64-bit integers).

  • 4
    Beat me to it. +1 – Pesto Aug 24 '09 at 13:53
  • 1
    @AndreasT: No problem! (BTW, to see why you need to go all the way up to n >> 16, consider what happens if n is already a power of 2. You'll only have a single 1 bit that needs to cover all of the previous bits, which is why all the shifting is necessary.) – John Feminella Aug 24 '09 at 14:16
  • 2
    +1 yes, good trick, I like it :) Some more bit-twiddling tricks can be found here: graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html – zxcat Sep 9 '09 at 13:39
  • 1
    Though this works but could anyone please give an explanation on why it works? – Divick Feb 20 '13 at 19:16
  • 1
    @endolith That takes log N shifts. This takes log(log N) shifts, so it uses fewer shifts. – John Feminella Oct 9 '13 at 13:21
29

There is actually a assembly solution for this (since the 80386 instruction set).

You can use the BSR (Bit Scan Reverse) instruction to scan for the most significant bit in your integer.

bsr scans the bits, starting at the most significant bit, in the doubleword operand or the second word. If the bits are all zero, ZF is cleared. Otherwise, ZF is set and the bit index of the first set bit found, while scanning in the reverse direction, is loaded into the destination register

(Extracted from: http://dlc.sun.com/pdf/802-1948/802-1948.pdf)

And than inc the result with 1.

so:

bsr ecx, eax  //eax = number
jz  @zero
mov eax, 2    // result set the second bit (instead of a inc ecx)
shl eax, ecx  // and move it ecx times to the left
ret           // result is in eax

@zero:
xor eax, eax
ret

In newer CPU's you can use the much faster lzcnt instruction (aka rep bsr). lzcnt does its job in a single cycle.

  • that is cool! thx! – AndreasT Aug 26 '09 at 17:29
  • If your input is already a power of 2, this will not return it though – endolith Oct 3 '13 at 2:15
21

A more mathematical way, without loops:

public static int ByLogs(int n)
{
    double y = Math.Floor(Math.Log(n, 2));

    return (int)Math.Pow(2, y + 1);
}
  • 2
    Thanks. But I was searching for a "bit-twiddle" way. ;-) – AndreasT Aug 24 '09 at 14:06
  • 5
    +1, not what the OP wanted, but strangely enough I needed an answer that would fit in a single inline expression: 2 ^ (floor(log(x) / log(2)) + 1) – zildjohn01 Jul 12 '10 at 18:55
  • 3
    It gets you the existing value. The next part, y+1 gets you the next largest power. – DanDan Jan 8 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    @DanDan: but if n is already a power of 2, it gives the next power of 2 rather than returning n – endolith Dec 9 '13 at 2:48
  • 2
    @endolith: If n is a power of two and you want to obtain n instead of "the next power of two", you can use 2 ^ ( ceil(log(x) / log(2)) ) instead. But that was not the question (…how can I find the next number k > n…) – Wauzl Mar 14 '16 at 11:56
12

Here's a logic answer:

function getK(int n)
{
  int k = 1;
  while (k < n)
    k *= 2;
  return k;
}
  • Ha, so simple! Didn't think about that one :) – v01pe Mar 9 '17 at 11:51
8

Here's John Feminella's answer implemented as a loop so it can handle Python's long integers:

def next_power_of_2(n):
    """
    Return next power of 2 greater than or equal to n
    """
    n -= 1 # greater than OR EQUAL TO n
    shift = 1
    while (n+1) & n: # n+1 is not a power of 2 yet
        n |= n >> shift
        shift <<= 1
    return n + 1

It also returns faster if n is already a power of 2.

For Python >2.7, this is simpler and faster for most N:

def next_power_of_2(n):
    """
    Return next power of 2 greater than or equal to n
    """
    return 2**(n-1).bit_length()

enter image description here

  • 2
    If you're going to use bit shifts, you might as well do shift <<= 1 instead of shift *= 2. Not sure if that's actually faster in Python, but it should be. – Chris Middleton Apr 5 '15 at 17:49
3

Here's a wild one that has no loops, but uses an intermediate float.

//  compute k = nextpowerof2(n)

if (n > 1) 
{
  float f = (float) n;
  unsigned int const t = 1U << ((*(unsigned int *)&f >> 23) - 0x7f);
  k = t << (t < n);
}
else k = 1;

This, and many other bit-twiddling hacks, including the on submitted by John Feminella, can be found here.

  • 1
    wtf! 8-) , will check it out. Thx – AndreasT Aug 26 '09 at 17:28
3

Greater than / Greater than or equal to

The following snippets are for the next number k > n such that k = 2^i
(n=123 => k=128, n=128 => k=256) as specified by OP.

If you want the smallest power of 2 greater than OR equal to n then just replace __builtin_clzll(n) by __builtin_clzll(n-1) within the above snippets.

C++11 using GCC or Clang (64 bits)

constexpr uint64_t nextPowerOfTwo64 (uint64_t n)
{
    return 1ULL << (sizeof(uint64_t) * 8 - __builtin_clzll(n));
}

Enhancement using CHAR_BIT as proposed by martinec

#include <cstdint>

constexpr uint64_t nextPowerOfTwo64 (uint64_t n)
{
    return 1ULL << (sizeof(uint64_t) * CHAR_BIT - __builtin_clzll(n));
}

C++17 using GCC or Clang (from 8 to 128 bits)

#include <cstdint>

template <typename T>
constexpr T nextPowerOfTwo64 (T n)
{
   T clz = 0;
   if constexpr (sizeof(T) <= 32)
      clz = __builtin_clzl(n); // unsigned long
   else if (sizeof(T) <= 64)
      clz = __builtin_clzll(n); // unsigned long long
   else { // See https://stackoverflow.com/a/40528716
      uint64_t hi = n >> 64;
      uint64_t lo = (hi == 0) ? n : -1ULL;
      clz = _lzcnt_u64(hi) + _lzcnt_u64(lo);
   }
   return T{1} << (CHAR_BIT * sizeof(T) - clz);
}

Other compilers

If you use a compiler other than GCC or Clang, please visit the Wikipedia page listing the Count Leading Zeroes bitwise functions:

  • Visual C++ 2005 => Replace __builtin_clzl() by _BitScanForward()
  • Visual C++ 2008 => Replace __builtin_clzl() by __lzcnt()
  • icc => Replace __builtin_clzl() by _bit_scan_forward
  • GHC (Haskell) => Replace __builtin_clzl() by countLeadingZeros()

Contribution welcome

Please propose improvements within the comments. Also propose alternative for the compiler you use, or your programming language...

See also similar answers

2

assume x is not negative.

int pot = Integer.highestOneBit(x);
if (pot != x) {
    pot *= 2;
}
2

If you use GCC, MinGW or Clang:

template <typename T>
T nextPow2(T in)
{
  return (in & (T)(in - 1)) ? (1U << (sizeof(T) * 8 - __builtin_clz(in))) : in;
}

If you use Microsoft Visual C++, use function _BitScanForward() to replace __builtin_clz().

1
function Pow2Thing(int n)
{
    x = 1;
    while (n>0)
    {
        n/=2;
        x*=2;
    }
    return x;
}
1

Bit-twiddling, you say?

long int pow_2_ceil(long int t) {
    if (t == 0) return 1;
    if (t != (t & -t)) {
        do {
            t -= t & -t;
        } while (t != (t & -t));
        t <<= 1;
    }
    return t;
}

Each loop strips the least-significant 1-bit directly. N.B. This only works where signed numbers are encoded in two's complement.

  • 1
    You can safely replace your while with do/while and save one test, as you've already confirmed the initial test with the preceding if statement. – seh Jan 9 '15 at 1:38
  • Thanks @seh; improved with do while. – Derek Illchuk Jan 9 '15 at 16:15
  • Fastest method here, why no upvotes? Although, I changed to while(t > (t & -t)). – primo Jan 27 '17 at 16:26
  • @primo At least in C# the accepted answer is over 2.5 times faster on average for 32-bit integers. – NetMage Jun 26 at 20:47
0

What about something like this:

int pot = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < 31; i++, pot <<= 1)
    if (pot >= x)
        break;
0

You just need to find the most significant bit and shift it left once. Here's a Python implementation. I think x86 has an instruction to get the MSB, but here I'm implementing it all in straight Python. Once you have the MSB it's easy.

>>> def msb(n):
...     result = -1
...     index = 0
...     while n:
...         bit = 1 << index
...         if bit & n:
...             result = index
...             n &= ~bit
...         index += 1
...     return result
...
>>> def next_pow(n):
...     return 1 << (msb(n) + 1)
...
>>> next_pow(1)
2
>>> next_pow(2)
4
>>> next_pow(3)
4
>>> next_pow(4)
8
>>> next_pow(123)
128
>>> next_pow(222)
256
>>>
  • Talking about assembly in a Python answer adds no value since Python uses byte code... – YoYoYonnY Mar 3 '16 at 17:45
0

Forget this! It uses loop !

     unsigned int nextPowerOf2 ( unsigned int u)
     {
         unsigned int v = 0x80000000; // supposed 32-bit unsigned int

         if (u < v) {
            while (v > u) v = v >> 1;
         }
         return (v << 1);  // return 0 if number is too big
     }
0
private static int nextHighestPower(int number){
    if((number & number-1)==0){
        return number;
    }
    else{
        int count=0;
        while(number!=0){
            number=number>>1;
            count++;
        }
        return 1<<count;
    }
}
-3
// n is the number
int min = (n&-n);
int nextPowerOfTwo = n+min;
  • Is this idea: fill out the all the 1s up to the largest, currently 'on' bit? If so, would it be n+min+1? – Garet Claborn Feb 13 '11 at 11:24
  • 2
    This doesn't work, unfortunately. Try for example for n=19 – Jean-Denis Muys May 22 '12 at 14:12
  • This fails. (5 & -5) = 1; 5 + 1 = 6. – Olathe Apr 23 '13 at 13:21
-3
#define nextPowerOf2(x, n) (x + (n-1)) & ~(n-1)

or even

#define nextPowerOf2(x, n)  x + (x & (n-1)) 

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