201

How can I convert seconds to an HH-MM-SS string using JavaScript?

34 Answers 34

101

Don't you know datejs? it is a must know.

Using datejs, just write something like:

(new Date).clearTime()
          .addSeconds(15457)
          .toString('H:mm:ss');

--update

Nowadays date.js is outdated and not maintained, so use "Moment.js", which is much better as pointed out by T.J. Crowder.

  • 10
    @Yassir and Cleiton: FWIW, DateJS hasn't been maintained in years, and does have a couple of outstanding bugs (although to my knowledge, they're mostly in regard to parsing and midnight). momentjs seems pretty good, and is currently maintained. – T.J. Crowder Nov 21 '12 at 8:31
  • 1
    @Cleiton, your updated answer is not full. I tried it as is and got: TypeError: Object [object Date] has no method 'clearTime'. – Hamish Grubijan Apr 25 '13 at 21:26
  • 14
    Granted Moment.js isn't all that big but if all you're doing with it is to convert seconds to hh:mm:ss, it seems like a bit of overkill. Rather use one of the functions suggested in these or other answers. – Ola Karlsson Sep 20 '13 at 6:37
  • 1
    This answer is, if anything, partially wrong. What happens if the amount exceeds 86400 seconds? ;) – Vitor Tyburski Jun 16 '14 at 21:13
  • 3
    I think the other solution is better than throwing another js library in the mix. – Donato Jul 18 '16 at 16:55
340

You can manage to do this without any external JavaScript library with the help of JavaScript Date method like following:

var date = new Date(null);
date.setSeconds(SECONDS); // specify value for SECONDS here
var result = date.toISOString().substr(11, 8);

Or, as per @Frank's comment; a one liner:

new Date(SECONDS * 1000).toISOString().substr(11, 8);
  • 34
    I don't know why everyone is adding extra libraries or doing the math manually when this works perfectly. Thanks! – jminardi Apr 13 '15 at 23:42
  • 89
    This can even be shortened to one line: new Date(SECONDS * 1000).toISOString().substr(11, 8); – Frank Jan 13 '16 at 20:17
  • 3
    Brilliant. Without any 3rd party lib. It's best – Riz Nov 25 '16 at 14:31
  • 37
    The problem with this approach is that it will overflow after 24 hours, preventing you from showing more than this length of time. Perfect solution if you have less than 24 hours in seconds. – Renato Gama Feb 12 '17 at 13:18
  • 1
    This does not work for me in IE11, I get Object doesn't support property or method 'toISOString' – NibblyPig Feb 22 '17 at 16:58
130

I don't think any built-in feature of the standard Date object will do this for you in a way that's more convenient than just doing the math yourself.

hours = Math.floor(totalSeconds / 3600);
totalSeconds %= 3600;
minutes = Math.floor(totalSeconds / 60);
seconds = totalSeconds % 60;

Example:

let totalSeconds = 28565;
let hours = Math.floor(totalSeconds / 3600);
totalSeconds %= 3600;
let minutes = Math.floor(totalSeconds / 60);
let seconds = totalSeconds % 60;

console.log("hours: " + hours);
console.log("minutes: " + minutes);
console.log("seconds: " + seconds);

// If you want strings with leading zeroes:
minutes = String(minutes).padStart(2, "0");
hours = String(hours).padStart(2, "0");
seconds = String(seconds).padStart(2, "0");
console.log(hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds);

  • There's some issues with this I think? When I tried it, I was getting decimals back, so 180 seconds would return 0.05 in the hours variable. I put it inside a parseInt which fixed it for my case, but I don't think that'd be accurate for everything. Still, this helped me, so thanks! – BT643 Mar 18 '14 at 12:08
  • @BT643: Odd that I didn't handle that. I've done so now, you don't want to use parseInt for it, that's for parsing strings, not manipulating numbers. Math.floor would be the relevant operation here. – T.J. Crowder Mar 18 '14 at 12:15
  • 1
    Ah, ok! Changed my code. Although you do probably want it on the seconds as well: seconds = Math.floor(totalSeconds % 60);. I just got a decimal result there too. – BT643 Mar 18 '14 at 12:37
  • @BT643: totalSeconds % 60 can only have a fractional portion if totalSeconds has a fractional portion. Whether you want to floor it will depend on whether you want to lose that information or retain it. (The other floor operations we're doing don't lose any information, because they're just clearing out the data that will end up in minutes and seconds.) – T.J. Crowder Mar 18 '14 at 12:52
  • 8
    @HannounYassir console.log( hours +':'+ ('0'+minutes).slice(-2) +':'+ ('0'+seconds).slice(-2) ); – Xavi Esteve Aug 1 '14 at 9:37
35

I know this is kinda old, but...

ES2015:

var toHHMMSS = (secs) => {
    var sec_num = parseInt(secs, 10)
    var hours   = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600)
    var minutes = Math.floor(sec_num / 60) % 60
    var seconds = sec_num % 60

    return [hours,minutes,seconds]
        .map(v => v < 10 ? "0" + v : v)
        .filter((v,i) => v !== "00" || i > 0)
        .join(":")
}

It will output:

toHHMMSS(129600) // 36:00:00
toHHMMSS(13545) // 03:45:45
toHHMMSS(180) // 03:00
toHHMMSS(18) // 00:18
  • What about fractions of a second? 03:45:45.xxx? – Mike Stoddart Jun 16 '17 at 18:54
  • @SantiagoHernández Great! This now works perfectly for times over 24 hours. – Stefnotch Jun 11 at 19:05
  • +1. This or the T.J. should be the accepted answer, as those are the only ones which work for situations when duration exceeds 24 hours (and the question doesn't limit duration). – George Y. Jul 24 at 21:21
33

As Cleiton pointed out in his answer, moment.js can be used for this:

moment().startOf('day')
        .seconds(15457)
        .format('H:mm:ss');
  • 5
    What happens if the number of seconds exceeds a day? – Gilad Peleg Dec 27 '15 at 12:21
  • 3
    @GiladPeleg if the number of seconds exceeds a day, number of days is calculated internally and it will only return the remaining hours, minutes and seconds. If you want to count number of days as well, you can try moment().startOf('year').seconds(30000000).format('DDD HH:mm:ss'). – elquimista Mar 4 '16 at 18:12
  • 9
    What happens if the number of seconds exceeds a year? – OrangePot May 9 '17 at 21:47
  • 3
    @OrangePot if the number of seconds exceeds a year, number of years is calculated internally and it will only return the remaining days, hours, minutes and seconds. If you want to count number of years as well, you can try .format('YYYY DDD HH:mm:ss') – David Callanan Aug 25 '17 at 21:46
  • 1
    But this cannot be made optional. That might look ugly. – shaedrich May 25 '18 at 23:02
19
function formatSeconds(seconds)
{
    var date = new Date(1970,0,1);
    date.setSeconds(seconds);
    return date.toTimeString().replace(/.*(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}).*/, "$1");
}
  • 2
    formatSeconds(3919); //Returns 01:05:19 Excellent Function .. Like it – Samrat Saha Apr 1 '14 at 7:25
  • 4
    Doesn't work if you go above 24h – Jeremy Belolo Dec 4 '17 at 9:13
16

This does the trick:

function secondstotime(secs)
{
    var t = new Date(1970,0,1);
    t.setSeconds(secs);
    var s = t.toTimeString().substr(0,8);
    if(secs > 86399)
        s = Math.floor((t - Date.parse("1/1/70")) / 3600000) + s.substr(2);
    return s;
}

(Sourced from here)

10
     var  timeInSec = "661"; //even it can be string

            String.prototype.toHHMMSS = function () { 
               /* extend the String by using prototypical inheritance */
                var seconds = parseInt(this, 10); // don't forget the second param
                var hours   = Math.floor(seconds / 3600);
                var minutes = Math.floor((seconds - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
                seconds = seconds - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);

                if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
                if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
                if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
                var time    = hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
                return time;
            }

            alert("5678".toHHMMSS());   // "01:34:38"
            console.log(timeInSec.toHHMMSS());   //"00:11:01"

we can make this function lot shorter and crisp but that decreases the readability, so we will write it as simple as possible and as stable as possible.

or you can check this working here:

  • moreover ... if u want to do all date time thing easily.. use momentJS – sheelpriy Aug 13 '15 at 7:45
  • Thanks! no need to include a Library in a browser extension. Simple and works! – Arlo Aug 27 '18 at 19:08
9

Try this:

function toTimeString(seconds) {
  return (new Date(seconds * 1000)).toUTCString().match(/(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d)/)[0];
}
6

Here is an extension to Number class. toHHMMSS() converts seconds to an hh:mm:ss string.

Number.prototype.toHHMMSS = function() {
  var hours = Math.floor(this / 3600) < 10 ? ("00" + Math.floor(this / 3600)).slice(-2) : Math.floor(this / 3600);
  var minutes = ("00" + Math.floor((this % 3600) / 60)).slice(-2);
  var seconds = ("00" + (this % 3600) % 60).slice(-2);
  return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds;
}

// Usage: [number variable].toHHMMSS();

// Here is a simple test
var totalseconds = 1234;
document.getElementById("timespan").innerHTML = totalseconds.toHHMMSS();
// HTML of the test
<div id="timespan"></div>

5

Easy to follow version for noobies:

 var totalNumberOfSeconds = YOURNUMBEROFSECONDS;
 var hours = parseInt( totalNumberOfSeconds / 3600 );
 var minutes = parseInt( (totalNumberOfSeconds - (hours * 3600)) / 60 );
 var seconds = Math.floor((totalNumberOfSeconds - ((hours * 3600) + (minutes * 60))));
 var result = (hours < 10 ? "0" + hours : hours) + ":" + (minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes) + ":" + (seconds  < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds);
 console.log(result);
5

This function should do it :

var convertTime = function (input, separator) {
    var pad = function(input) {return input < 10 ? "0" + input : input;};
    return [
        pad(Math.floor(input / 3600)),
        pad(Math.floor(input % 3600 / 60)),
        pad(Math.floor(input % 60)),
    ].join(typeof separator !== 'undefined' ?  separator : ':' );
}

Without passing a separator, it uses : as the (default) separator :

time = convertTime(13551.9941351); // --> OUTPUT = 03:45:51

If you want to use - as a separator, just pass it as the second parameter:

time = convertTime(1126.5135155, '-'); // --> OUTPUT = 00-18-46

See also this Fiddle.

  • Could use default parameters like (input ,separator=":"). Also it didn't return anything until I modified it a bit paste.ee/p/FDNag – madprops Mar 24 '18 at 19:28
  • @madprops : Actually, the version in my answer already sets : as default for the separator parameter, as I already explained. This is done by the statement typeof separator !== 'undefined' ? separator : ':'. Also, your function is pretty much identical to mine save some cosmetic changes and they should both produce the same output... except my version has much better browser support. Yours won't work in ANY version of Internet Explorer or MS Edge < 14. – John Slegers Jul 17 at 21:48
4

I just wanted to give a little explanation to the nice answer above:

var totalSec = new Date().getTime() / 1000;
var hours = parseInt( totalSec / 3600 ) % 24;
var minutes = parseInt( totalSec / 60 ) % 60;
var seconds = totalSec % 60;

var result = (hours < 10 ? "0" + hours : hours) + "-" + (minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes) + "-" + (seconds  < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds);

On the second line, since there are 3600 seconds in 1 hour, we divide the total number of seconds by 3600 to get the total number of hours. We use parseInt to strip off any decimal. If totalSec was 12600 (3 and half hours), then parseInt( totalSec / 3600 ) would return 3, since we will have 3 full hours. Why do we need the % 24 in this case? If we exceed 24 hours, let's say we have 25 hours (90000 seconds), then the modulo here will take us back to 1 again, rather than returning 25. It is confining the result within a 24 hour limit, since there are 24 hours in one day.

When you see something like this:

25 % 24

Think of it like this:

25 mod 24 or what is the remainder when we divide 25 by 24
4

Chiming in on this old thread -- the OP stated HH:MM:SS, and many of the solutions work, until you realize you need more than 24 hours listed. And maybe you don't want more than a single line of code. Here you go:

d=(s)=>{f=Math.floor;g=(n)=>('00'+n).slice(-2);return f(s/3600)+':'+g(f(s/60)%60)+':'+g(s%60)}

It returns H+:MM:SS. To use it, simply use:

d(91260);     // returns "25:21:00"
d(960);       // returns "0:16:00"

...I tried to get it to use the least amount of code possible, for a nice one-liner approach.

  • 1
    Can you provide an expanded/reading version of your code as well so we can more easily see what is happening? Thanks. – Kimball Jun 30 '17 at 2:30
4

below is the given code which will convert seconds into hh-mm-ss format:

var measuredTime = new Date(null);
measuredTime.setSeconds(4995); // specify value of SECONDS
var MHSTime = measuredTime.toISOString().substr(11, 8);

Get alternative method from Convert seconds to HH-MM-SS format in JavaScript

3
var time1 = date1.getTime();
var time2 = date2.getTime();
var totalMilisec = time2 - time1;

alert(DateFormat('hh:mm:ss',new Date(totalMilisec)))

 /* ----------------------------------------------------------
 *  Field        | Full Form          | Short Form
 *  -------------|--------------------|-----------------------
 *  Year         | yyyy (4 digits)    | yy (2 digits)
 *  Month        | MMM (abbr.)        | MM (2 digits)
                 | NNN (name)         |
 *  Day of Month | dd (2 digits)      | 
 *  Day of Week  | EE (name)          | E (abbr)
 *  Hour (1-12)  | hh (2 digits)      | 
 *  Minute       | mm (2 digits)      | 
 *  Second       | ss (2 digits)      | 
 *  ----------------------------------------------------------
 */
function DateFormat(formatString,date){
    if (typeof date=='undefined'){
    var DateToFormat=new Date();
    }
    else{
        var DateToFormat=date;
    }
    var DAY         = DateToFormat.getDate();
    var DAYidx      = DateToFormat.getDay();
    var MONTH       = DateToFormat.getMonth()+1;
    var MONTHidx    = DateToFormat.getMonth();
    var YEAR        = DateToFormat.getYear();
    var FULL_YEAR   = DateToFormat.getFullYear();
    var HOUR        = DateToFormat.getHours();
    var MINUTES     = DateToFormat.getMinutes();
    var SECONDS     = DateToFormat.getSeconds();

    var arrMonths = new Array("January","February","March","April","May","June","July","August","September","October","November","December");
    var arrDay=new Array('Sunday','Monday','Tuesday','Wednesday','Thursday','Friday','Saturday');
    var strMONTH;
    var strDAY;
    var strHOUR;
    var strMINUTES;
    var strSECONDS;
    var Separator;

    if(parseInt(MONTH)< 10 && MONTH.toString().length < 2)
        strMONTH = "0" + MONTH;
    else
        strMONTH=MONTH;
    if(parseInt(DAY)< 10 && DAY.toString().length < 2)
        strDAY = "0" + DAY;
    else
        strDAY=DAY;
    if(parseInt(HOUR)< 10 && HOUR.toString().length < 2)
        strHOUR = "0" + HOUR;
    else
        strHOUR=HOUR;
    if(parseInt(MINUTES)< 10 && MINUTES.toString().length < 2)
        strMINUTES = "0" + MINUTES;
    else
        strMINUTES=MINUTES;
    if(parseInt(SECONDS)< 10 && SECONDS.toString().length < 2)
        strSECONDS = "0" + SECONDS;
    else
        strSECONDS=SECONDS;

    switch (formatString){
        case "hh:mm:ss":
            return strHOUR + ':' + strMINUTES + ':' + strSECONDS;
        break;
        //More cases to meet your requirements.
    }
}
3

Have you tried adding seconds to a Date object?

var dt = new Date();
dt.addSeconds(1234);

A sample: https://jsfiddle.net/j5g2p0dc/5/

Updated: Sample link was missing so I created a new one.

  • Uncaught TypeError: dt.addSeconds is not a function – Ikrom Jun 11 '18 at 11:10
  • @Ikrom check the sample, I created a new one in jsfiddle since the old one returned 404 error – kpull1 Jun 18 '18 at 14:15
  • Looks like I didn't release that you were using custom method addSeconds on Date object like Date.prototype.addSeconds = function(seconds){...}. Yes, it works, thanks for the update. – Ikrom Jun 18 '18 at 15:17
2

Here is a function to convert seconds to hh-mm-ss format based on powtac's answer here

jsfiddle

/** 
 * Convert seconds to hh-mm-ss format.
 * @param {number} totalSeconds - the total seconds to convert to hh- mm-ss
**/
var SecondsTohhmmss = function(totalSeconds) {
  var hours   = Math.floor(totalSeconds / 3600);
  var minutes = Math.floor((totalSeconds - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
  var seconds = totalSeconds - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);

  // round seconds
  seconds = Math.round(seconds * 100) / 100

  var result = (hours < 10 ? "0" + hours : hours);
      result += "-" + (minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes);
      result += "-" + (seconds  < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds);
  return result;
}

Example use

var seconds = SecondsTohhmmss(70);
console.log(seconds);
// logs 00-01-10
2

After looking at all the answers and not being happy with most of them, this is what I came up with. I know I am very late to the conversation, but here it is anyway.

function secsToTime(secs){
  var time = new Date(); 
  // create Date object and set to today's date and time
  time.setHours(parseInt(secs/3600) % 24);
  time.setMinutes(parseInt(secs/60) % 60);
  time.setSeconds(parseInt(secs%60));
  time = time.toTimeString().split(" ")[0];
  // time.toString() = "HH:mm:ss GMT-0800 (PST)"
  // time.toString().split(" ") = ["HH:mm:ss", "GMT-0800", "(PST)"]
  // time.toTimeString().split(" ")[0]; = "HH:mm:ss"
  return time;
}

I create a new Date object, change the time to my parameters, convert the Date Object to a time string, and removed the additional stuff by splitting the string and returning only the part that need.

I thought I would share this approach, since it removes the need for regex, logic and math acrobatics to get the results in "HH:mm:ss" format, and instead it relies on built in methods.

You may want to take a look at the documentation here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date

2

There are lots of options of solve this problem, and obvious there are good option suggested about, But I wants to add one more optimized code here

function formatSeconds(sec) {
     return [(sec / 3600), ((sec % 3600) / 60), ((sec % 3600) % 60)]
            .map(v => v < 10 ? "0" + parseInt(v) : parseInt(v))
            .filter((i, j) => i !== "00" || j > 0)
            .join(":");
}

if you don't wants formatted zero with less then 10 number, you can use

function formatSeconds(sec) {
  return parseInt(sec / 3600) + ':' + parseInt((sec % 3600) / 60) + ':' + parseInt((sec % 3600) % 60);

}

Sample Code http://fiddly.org/1c476/1

2

In one line, using T.J. Crowder's solution :

secToHHMMSS = seconds => `${Math.floor(seconds / 3600)}:${Math.floor((seconds % 3600) / 60)}:${Math.floor((seconds % 3600) % 60)}`

In one line, another solution that also count days :

secToDHHMMSS = seconds => `${parseInt(seconds / 86400)}d ${new Date(seconds * 1000).toISOString().substr(11, 8)}`

Source : https://gist.github.com/martinbean/2bf88c446be8048814cf02b2641ba276

2
var sec_to_hms = function(sec){
var min, hours;
     sec = sec - (min = Math.floor(sec/60))*60;
     min = min - (hours = Math.floor(min/60))*60;
     return (hours?hours+':':'') + ((min+'').padStart(2, '0')) + ':'+ ((sec+'').padStart(2, '0'));
}
alert(sec_to_hms(2442542));
1

You can also use below code:

int ss = nDur%60;
nDur   = nDur/60;
int mm = nDur%60;
int hh = nDur/60;
1

new Date().toString().split(" ")[4];

result 15:08:03

1

For anyone using AngularJS, a simple solution is to filter the value with the date API, which converts milliseconds to a string based on the requested format. Example:

<div>Offer ends in {{ timeRemaining | date: 'HH:mm:ss' }}</div>

Note that this expects milliseconds, so you may want to multiply timeRemaining by 1000 if you are converting from seconds (as the original question was formulated).

1

I ran into the case some have mentioned where the number of seconds is more than a day. Here's an adapted version of @Harish Anchu's top-rated answer that accounts for longer periods of time:

function secondsToTime(seconds) {
  const arr = new Date(seconds * 1000).toISOString().substr(11, 8).split(':');

  const days = Math.floor(seconds / 86400);
  arr[0] = parseInt(arr[0], 10) + days * 24;

  return arr.join(':');
}

Example:

secondsToTime(101596) // outputs '28:13:16' as opposed to '04:13:16'
1
String.prototype.toHHMMSS = function () {
    var sec_num = parseInt(this, 10); // don't forget the second param
    var hours   = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600);
    var minutes = Math.floor((sec_num - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
    var seconds = sec_num - (hours * 3600) - (minutes * 60);

    if (hours   < 10) {hours   = "0"+hours;}
    if (minutes < 10) {minutes = "0"+minutes;}
    if (seconds < 10) {seconds = "0"+seconds;}
    return hours+':'+minutes+':'+seconds;
}

Usage Example

alert("186".toHHMMSS());
1

None of the answers here satisfies my requirements as I want to be able to handle

  1. Large numbers of seconds (days), and
  2. Negative numbers

Although those are not required by the OP, it's good practice to cover edge cases, especially when it takes little effort.

It's pretty obvious is that the OP means a NUMBER of seconds when he says seconds. Why would peg your function on String?

function secondsToTimeSpan(seconds) {
    const value = Math.abs(seconds);
    const days = Math.floor(value / 1440);
    const hours = Math.floor((value - (days * 1440)) / 3600);
    const min = Math.floor((value - (days * 1440) - (hours * 3600)) / 60);
    const sec = value - (days * 1440) - (hours * 3600) - (min * 60);
    return `${seconds < 0 ? '-':''}${days > 0 ? days + '.':''}${hours < 10 ? '0' + hours:hours}:${min < 10 ? '0' + min:min}:${sec < 10 ? '0' + sec:sec}`
}
secondsToTimeSpan(0);       // => 00:00:00
secondsToTimeSpan(1);       // => 00:00:01
secondsToTimeSpan(1440);    // => 1.00:00:00
secondsToTimeSpan(-1440);   // => -1.00:00:00
secondsToTimeSpan(-1);      // => -00:00:01
  • secondsToTimeSpan(8991) returns 6.00:05:51 whereas i think it should return 00:02:29:51 – user1063287 Jul 6 at 7:11
0

I've used this code before to create a simple timespan object:

function TimeSpan(time) {
this.hours = 0;
this.minutes = 0;
this.seconds = 0;

while(time >= 3600)
{
    this.hours++;
    time -= 3600;
}

while(time >= 60)
{
    this.minutes++;
    time -= 60;
}

this.seconds = time;
}

var timespan = new Timespan(3662);
  • 1
    looping results is a very bad coding technique and should never be used it will hog your processing power and give you a laggy site – yan bellavance Mar 17 '18 at 10:54
0

Maybe something like this:

var Convert = function (time) {
    const HOUR = 60 * 60;
    const MINUTE = 60;

    var minutesInSeconds = time % HOUR;
    var hours = Math.floor(time / HOUR);
    var minutes = Math.floor(minutesInSeconds / MINUTE)
    var seconds = minutesInSeconds % MINUTE;

    return hours.padStart(2, 0) + ':' + minutes.padStart(2, 0) + ':' + seconds.padStart(2, 0);
}

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