195

I currently have a few unit tests which share a common set of tests. Here's an example:

import unittest

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The output of the above is:

Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest1:testSub1
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest2:testSub2
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 5 tests in 0.000s

OK

Is there a way to rewrite the above so that the very first testCommon is not called?

EDIT: Instead of running 5 tests above, I want it to run only 4 tests, 2 from the SubTest1 and another 2 from SubTest2. It seems that Python unittest is running the original BaseTest on its own and I need a mechanism to prevent that from happening.

2
  • I see noone has mentioned it but do you have the option to change main part and run a test suite that has all subclasses of BaseTest?
    – kon psych
    Sep 27, 2015 at 4:28
  • Is there still no great solution for this in 2022? Multiple inheritance is awkward and leads to linting issues. setUpClass with raising SkipTest is pretty good but the test runner shows skipped tests. Other frameworks solve these kinds of issues by adding an __abstract__ = True. Is there no clean way to do this still? Feb 28, 2022 at 0:52

16 Answers 16

205

Do not use multiple inheritance, it will bite you later.

Instead you can just move your base class into the separate module or wrap it with the blank class:

class BaseTestCases:

    class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

        def testCommon(self):
            print('Calling BaseTest:testCommon')
            value = 5
            self.assertEqual(value, 5)


class SubTest1(BaseTestCases.BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print('Calling SubTest1:testSub1')
        sub = 3
        self.assertEqual(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTestCases.BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print('Calling SubTest2:testSub2')
        sub = 4
        self.assertEqual(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The output:

Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest1:testSub1
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest2:testSub2
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 4 tests in 0.001s

OK
5
  • 10
    This is my favorite. It is the least hacky means and doesn't interfere with overriding methods, doesn't alter the MRO and allows me to define setUp, setUpClass etc. in the base class.
    – Hannes
    May 27, 2015 at 22:18
  • 7
    I seriously don't get it (where does the magic come from ?), but it's far the best solution according to me :) Coming from Java, I hate Multiple Inheritance... Feb 24, 2016 at 5:46
  • 4
    @Edouardb unittest only runs module-level classes that inherit from TestCase. But BaseTest is not module-level.
    – JoshB
    Aug 16, 2016 at 12:21
  • As a very similar alternative, you could define the ABC inside a no-args function that returns the ABC when called
    – Anakhand
    May 1, 2020 at 11:00
  • 1
    This is a nice solution as long as unittest behaves like this (only running module-level classes). A more future-proof solution is to override the run(self, result=None) method in BaseTest: if self.__class__ is BaseTest: return result; else: return super().run(result).
    – interDist
    Aug 31, 2023 at 6:50
168

Use multiple inheritance, so your class with common tests doesn't itself inherit from TestCase.

import unittest

class CommonTests(object):
    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(unittest.TestCase, CommonTests):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(unittest.TestCase, CommonTests):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
7
  • 30
    This method only works for setUp and tearDown methods if you reverse the order of the base classes. Because the methods are defined in unittest.TestCase, and they don't call super(), then any setUp and tearDown methods in CommonTests need to be first in the MRO, or they won't be called at all. Oct 11, 2010 at 16:35
  • 36
    Just to clarify Ian Clelland's remark so that it will be clearer for people like me: if you add setUp and tearDown methods to CommonTests class, and you want them to be called for each test in derived classes, you have to reverse the order of the base classes, so that it will be: class SubTest1(CommonTests, unittest.TestCase). Jul 17, 2013 at 9:29
  • 10
    I'm not really a fan of this approach. This establishes a contract in the code that classes must inherit from both unittest.TestCase and CommonTests. I think the setUpClass method below is the best and is less prone to human error. Either that or wrapping the BaseTest class in a container class which is a bit more hacky but avoids the skip message in the test run printout. Oct 17, 2014 at 16:23
  • 15
    The problem with this one is pylint has a fit because CommonTests is invoking methods which don't exist in that class. Sep 18, 2015 at 3:07
  • 1
    I like this one the best. I argue CommonTests should not inherit from TestCase because it is not really a test case (i.e. you don't want it to run with your other tests). If you really don't like the "contract" that requires inheritance from both, consider a MixIn: `class CommonMixIn( CommonTests, unittest.TestCase):
    – CodeJockey
    Apr 10, 2017 at 17:27
40

You can solve this problem with a single command:

del(BaseTest)

So the code would look like this:

import unittest

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

del(BaseTest)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
4
  • 4
    BaseTest is a member of the module while it is being defined, so it is available for use as the base class of the SubTests. Just before the definition is complete, del() removes it as a member, so the unittest framework won't find it when it searches for TestCase subclasses in the module.
    – mhsmith
    May 5, 2015 at 13:51
  • 3
    this is an awesome answer! I like it more than @MatthewMarshall 's because in his solution, you'll get syntax errors from pylint, because the self.assert* methods do not exist in a standard object. May 7, 2015 at 17:59
  • 2
    Doesn't work if BaseTest is referenced anywhere else in the base class or its subclasses, e.g. when calling super() in method overrides: super( BaseTest, cls ).setUpClass( )
    – Hannes
    May 27, 2015 at 21:57
  • 2
    @Hannes At least in python 3, BaseTest can be referenced through super(self.__class__, self) or just super() in the subclasses, although apparently not if you were to inherit constructors. Maybe there is also such an "anonymous" alternative when the base class needs to reference itself (not that I have any idea when a class needs to reference itself).
    – Stein
    Aug 8, 2015 at 15:56
38

Matthew Marshall's answer is great, but it requires that you inherit from two classes in each of your test cases, which is error-prone. Instead, I use this (python>=2.7):

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        if cls is BaseTest:
            raise unittest.SkipTest("Skip BaseTest tests, it's a base class")
        super(BaseTest, cls).setUpClass()
6
  • 3
    That's neat. Is there a way to get around having to use a skip? To me, skips are undesireable and are used to indicate a problem in the current test plan (either with the code or the test)?
    – Zach Young
    Feb 5, 2014 at 19:29
  • @ZacharyYoung I don't know, maybe other answers can help. Feb 6, 2014 at 8:49
  • @ZacharyYoung I've tried to fix this problem, see my answer.
    – simonzack
    Jul 24, 2014 at 2:16
  • it's not immediately clear what is inherently error-prone about inheriting from two classes
    – jwg
    Apr 27, 2015 at 17:34
  • 1
    I like the approach of checking whether you're running in the BaseTest class. You can use some other documented TestCase features to avoid the skip result.
    – medmunds
    Jul 26, 2020 at 21:59
12

You can add __test__ = False in BaseTest class, but if you add it, be aware that you must add __test__ = True in derived classes to be able to run tests.

import unittest

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    __test__ = False

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(BaseTest):
    __test__ = True

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):
    __test__ = True

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
1
  • 2
    This solution does not work with unittest's own test discovery/test runner. (I believe it requires using an alternate test runner, like nose.)
    – medmunds
    Jul 26, 2020 at 20:37
8

What are you trying to achieve? If you have common test code (assertions, template tests, etc), then place them in methods which aren't prefixed with test so unittest won't load them.

import unittest

class CommonTests(unittest.TestCase):
      def common_assertion(self, foo, bar, baz):
          # whatever common code
          self.assertEqual(foo(bar), baz)

class BaseTest(CommonTests):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(CommonTests):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)

class SubTest2(CommonTests):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
2
  • 1
    Under your suggestion, would common_assertion() still be run automatically when testing the subclasses?
    – Stewart
    Apr 23, 2015 at 12:12
  • @Stewart No it would not. The default setting is to only run methods starting with "test".
    – C S
    Aug 27, 2018 at 18:30
7

Matthew's answer is the one I needed to use since I'm on 2.5 still. But as of 2.7 you can use the @unittest.skip() decorator on any test methods you want to skip.

http://docs.python.org/library/unittest.html#skipping-tests-and-expected-failures

You'll need to implement your own skipping decorator to check for the base type. Haven't used this feature before, but off the top of my head you could use BaseTest as a marker type to condition the skip:

def skipBaseTest(obj):
    if type(obj) is BaseTest:
        return unittest.skip("BaseTest tests skipped")
    return lambda func: func
6

A way I've thought of solving this is by hiding the test methods if the base class is used. This way the tests aren't skipped, so the test results can be green instead of yellow in many test reporting tools.

Compared to the mixin method, ide's like PyCharm won't complain that unit test methods are missing from the base class.

If a base class inherits from this class, it will need to override the setUpClass and tearDownClass methods.

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        cls._test_methods = []
        if cls is BaseTest:
            for name in dir(cls):
                if name.startswith('test') and callable(getattr(cls, name)):
                    cls._test_methods.append((name, getattr(cls, name)))
                    setattr(cls, name, lambda self: None)

    @classmethod
    def tearDownClass(cls):
        if cls is BaseTest:
            for name, method in cls._test_methods:
                setattr(cls, name, method)
            cls._test_methods = []
6

Another option is not to execute

unittest.main()

Instead of that you can use

suite = unittest.TestLoader().loadTestsFromTestCase(TestClass)
unittest.TextTestRunner(verbosity=2).run(suite)

So you only execute the tests in the class TestClass

1
  • This is the least hacky solution. Instead of modifying what unittest.main() collects into default suite you form explicit suite and run its tests.
    – zgoda
    May 26, 2017 at 9:55
2

Here is a solution that uses only documented unittest features, and that avoids having a "skip" status in your test results:

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def __init__(self, methodName='runTest'):
        if self.__class__ is BaseTest:
            # don't run these tests in the abstract base implementation
            methodName = 'runNoTestsInBaseClass'
        super().__init__(methodName)

    def runNoTestsInBaseClass(self):
        pass

    def testCommon(self):
        # everything else as in the original question

How it works: per the unittest.TestCase documentation, "Each instance of TestCase will run a single base method: the method named methodName." The default "runTests" runs all the test* methods on the class—that's how TestCase instances normally work. But when running in the abstract base class itself, you can simply override that behavior with a method that does nothing.

A side effect is your test count will increase by one: the runNoTestsInBaseClass "test" gets counted as a successful test when it's run on BaseClass.

(This also works in Python 2.7, if you're still on that. Just change super() to super(BaseTest, self).)

1
  • 1
    A better way is to override the run(result=None) method and just return the result in case of BaseTest. Then also the correct number of tests is reported.
    – interDist
    Aug 31, 2023 at 6:45
1

Just rename the testCommon method to something else. Unittest (usually) skips anything that doesn't have 'test' in it.

Quick and simple

  import unittest

  class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

   def methodCommon(self):
       print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
       value = 5
       self.assertEquals(value, 5)

  class SubTest1(BaseTest):

      def testSub1(self):
          print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
          sub = 3
          self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


  class SubTest2(BaseTest):

      def testSub2(self):
          print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
          sub = 4
          self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

  if __name__ == '__main__':
      unittest.main()`
1
  • 2
    This would have the result of not running the methodCommon test in either of the SubTests. Nov 17, 2015 at 22:31
1

I made about the same than @Vladim P. (https://stackoverflow.com/a/25695512/2451329) but slightly modified:

import unittest2


from some_module import func1, func2


def make_base_class(func):

    class Base(unittest2.TestCase):

        def test_common1(self):
            print("in test_common1")
            self.assertTrue(func())

        def test_common2(self):
            print("in test_common1")
            self.assertFalse(func(42))

    return Base



class A(make_base_class(func1)):
    pass


class B(make_base_class(func2)):

    def test_func2_with_no_arg_return_bar(self):
        self.assertEqual("bar", func2())

and there we go.

1

As of Python 3.2, you can add a test_loader function to a module to control which tests (if any) are found by the test discovery mechanism.

For example, the following will only load the original poster's SubTest1 and SubTest2 Test Cases, ignoring Base:

def load_tests(loader, standard_tests, pattern):
    suite = TestSuite()
    suite.addTests([SubTest1, SubTest2])
    return suite

It ought to be possible to iterate over standard_tests (a TestSuite containing the tests the default loader found) and copy all but Base to suite instead, but the nested nature of TestSuite.__iter__ makes that a lot more complicated.

0

So this is kind of an old thread but I came across this problem today and thought of my own hack for it. It uses a decorator that makes the values of the functions None when acessed through the base class. Don't need to worry about setup and setupclass because if the baseclass has no tests they won't run.

import types
import unittest


class FunctionValueOverride(object):
    def __init__(self, cls, default, override=None):
        self.cls = cls
        self.default = default
        self.override = override

    def __get__(self, obj, klass):
        if klass == self.cls:
            return self.override
        else:
            if obj:
                return types.MethodType(self.default, obj)
            else:
                return self.default


def fixture(cls):
    for t in vars(cls):
        if not callable(getattr(cls, t)) or t[:4] != "test":
            continue
        setattr(cls, t, FunctionValueOverride(cls, getattr(cls, t)))
    return cls


@fixture
class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def testCommon(self):
        print('Calling BaseTest:testCommon')
        value = 5
        self.assertEqual(value, 5)


class SubTest1(BaseTest):
    def testSub1(self):
        print('Calling SubTest1:testSub1')
        sub = 3
        self.assertEqual(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print('Calling SubTest2:testSub2')
        sub = 4
        self.assertEqual(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
0

I agree with the comment of @interDist.

The run method can also be overridden using a decorator to explicitly mark test classes which are meant to be base and their test methods must only be executed for the derived classes. See this answer for abstract test case using python unittest.

However, executing the same inherited test in derived test cases may indicate that the units (under test) are not well designed. See this answer for more details.

from unittest import TestCase


def base_test(cls):
    def run(self, result=None):
        return result if self.__class__ is cls else TestCase.run(self, result)

    cls.run = run
    return cls


@base_test
class Base(TestCase):
    """This test shall only be executed in subclasses."""
    def test_b(self):
        print(f"{Base.__doc__} {self.__class__.__name__}.test_b from {Base.__name__}")


class Derived(Base):
    def test_c(self):
        print(f"{self.__class__.__name__}.test_c")
-3

Change the BaseTest method name to setUp:

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)


class SubTest1(BaseTest):
    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):
    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

Output:

Ran 2 tests in 0.000s

Calling BaseTest:testCommon Calling
SubTest1:testSub1 Calling
BaseTest:testCommon Calling
SubTest2:testSub2

From the documentation:

TestCase.setUp()
Method called to prepare the test fixture. This is called immediately before calling the test method; any exception raised by this method will be considered an error rather than a test failure. The default implementation does nothing.

4
  • That would work, what if I have n testCommon, should I place them all under setUp? Aug 24, 2009 at 16:50
  • 1
    Yes you should put all code that is not an actual test case under setUp. Aug 24, 2009 at 16:56
  • But if a subclass has more than one test... method, setUp gets executed over and over and over again, once per such method; so it's NOT a good idea to put tests there! Aug 24, 2009 at 18:14
  • Not really sure what OP wanted in terms of when executed in a more complex scenario. Aug 24, 2009 at 18:36

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