I have a large database in which I want to do a part string search. The user will enter characters: JoeBloggs.

For arguments sake if I had a name Joe 23 Blo Ggs 4 in the database. I want to remove everything in the name other than A-Z.

I have the REPLACE(Name, ' ','') function to remove spaces and the UPPER() function to capitalize the name.

Is there a more efficient fast way maybe by terms of regex to replace anything other than A-Z. I cannot change the values in the database.

Thanks in advance

  • You say you can't change the data. Can you add a computed column to the existing table? Or add a new table with a foreign key and your computed value? – Laurence Nov 5 '12 at 21:04
  • @Laurence - Yea I suppose I can do this but can we do this in a temporary table in a stored procedure? If not then I can request this computed column, all i need is the function to do the replace. Thanks for your prompt response – CR41G14 Nov 5 '12 at 21:07
  • I'd not recommend using regexps if performance matters. The way you use is obvious but still a good one! – vyakhir Nov 5 '12 at 21:13
  • @DmitryVyakhirev - There could be some rouge characters like ' " @ /, it is a messy database so will I need to do multiple REPLACES to get rid of every instance of a bad character – CR41G14 Nov 5 '12 at 21:19

1st option -

You can nest REPLACE() functions up to 32 levels deep. It runs fast.

REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE
(REPLACE (@str, '0', ''),
'1', ''),
'2', ''),
'3', ''),
'4', ''),
'5', ''),
'6', ''),
'7', ''),
'8', ''),
'9', '')

2nd option -- do the reverse of -

Removing nonnumerical data out of a number + SQL

3rd option - if you want to use regex

then http://www.sqlteam.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=27205

This one works for me

CREATE Function [dbo].[RemoveNumericCharacters](@Temp VarChar(1000))
Returns VarChar(1000)
AS
Begin

    Declare @NumRange as varchar(50) = '%[0-9]%'
    While PatIndex(@NumRange, @Temp) > 0
        Set @Temp = Stuff(@Temp, PatIndex(@NumRange, @Temp), 1, '')

    Return @Temp
End

and you can use it like so

SELECT dbo.[RemoveNumericCharacters](Name) FROM TARGET_TABLE

Try below for your query. where val is your string or column name.

CASE WHEN PATINDEX('%[a-z]%', REVERSE(val)) > 1
                THEN LEFT(val, LEN(val) - PATINDEX('%[a-z]%', REVERSE(val)) + 1)
            ELSE '' END

One more approach using Recursive CTE..

declare @string varchar(100)
set @string ='te165st1230004616161616'

;With cte
as
(
select @string as string,0  as n
union all
select cast(replace(string,n,'') as varchar(100)),n+1
from cte
where n<9
)
select top 1 string from cte
order by n desc


**Output:**   
  test

Quoting part of @Jatin answer with some modifications,

use this in your where statement:

    SELECT * FROM .... etc.
        Where 
         REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE
        (REPLACE (Name, '0', ''),
        '1', ''),
        '2', ''),
        '3', ''),
        '4', ''),
        '5', ''),
        '6', ''),
        '7', ''),
        '8', ''),
        '9', '') = P_SEARCH_KEY

Not tested, but you can do something like this:

Create Function dbo.AlphasOnly(@s as varchar(max)) Returns varchar(max) As
Begin
  Declare @Pos int = 1
  Declare @Ret varchar(max) = null
  If @s Is Not Null
  Begin
    Set @Ret = ''
    While @Pos <= Len(@s)
    Begin
      If SubString(@s, @Pos, 1) Like '[A-Za-z]'
      Begin
        Set @Ret = @Ret + SubString(@s, @Pos, 1)
      End
      Set @Pos = @Pos + 1
    End
  End
  Return @Ret
End

The key is to use this as a computed column and index it. It doesn't really matter how fast you make this function if the database has to execute it against every row in your large table every time you run the query.

  • very slow solution, fast is required – CR41G14 Nov 5 '12 at 21:36
  • If you insist on doing Select name from test where dbo.AlphasOnly(name) = 'JoeBloggs' then this will be slow even if the function takes 0 time. You still pay the cost of reading all the rows off the disk (assuming when you say large table you mean your database doesn't fit in memory). To make it fast you need to find a way of indexing it, which is why I suggest a computed column. – Laurence Nov 5 '12 at 22:45

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