582

I want to read a file line by line, but without completely loading it in memory.

My file is too large to open in memory, and if try to do so I always get out of memory errors.

The file size is 1 GB.

2
  • see my answer at this link Nov 6, 2012 at 7:51
  • 8
    You should use fgets() without $length parameter.
    – Carlos
    Nov 6, 2012 at 7:51

14 Answers 14

831

You can use the fgets() function to read the file line by line:

$handle = fopen("inputfile.txt", "r");
if ($handle) {
    while (($line = fgets($handle)) !== false) {
        // process the line read.
    }

    fclose($handle);
}
7
  • 3
    How does this account for the too large to open in memory part?
    – Starx
    Nov 6, 2012 at 7:53
  • 81
    You are not reading the entire file in memory. The max memory needed to run this depends on the longest line in the input.
    – codaddict
    Nov 6, 2012 at 7:54
  • 13
    @Brandin - Moot - In those situations, the asked question, which is to read a file LINE BY LINE, does not have a well-defined result. Jun 30, 2016 at 18:57
  • 3
    @ToolmakerSteve Then define what should happen. If you want you can just print the message "Line too long; giving up." and that is a well-defined result too.
    – Brandin
    Jun 30, 2016 at 19:52
  • 2
    Can a line contain a boolean false? If so then this method would stop without reaching the end of file. The Example #1 on this URL php.net/manual/en/function.fgets.php suggests that fgets sometimes can return boolean false even though end of file has yet not been reached. In the comment section on that page people report that fgets() doesn't always return correct values, so it's safer to use feof as the loop conditional.
    – cjohansson
    Dec 7, 2016 at 11:21
139
if ($file = fopen("file.txt", "r")) {
    while(!feof($file)) {
        $line = fgets($file);
        # do same stuff with the $line
    }
    fclose($file);
}
3
129
+50

You can use an object oriented interface class for a file - SplFileObject http://php.net/manual/en/splfileobject.fgets.php (PHP 5 >= 5.1.0)

<?php

$file = new SplFileObject("file.txt");

// Loop until we reach the end of the file.
while (!$file->eof()) {
    // Echo one line from the file.
    echo $file->fgets();
}

// Unset the file to call __destruct(), closing the file handle.
$file = null;
5
  • 3
    much cleaner solution. thanks ;) haven't used this class yet, there are more interesting functions here to explore: php.net/manual/en/class.splfileobject.php May 10, 2015 at 19:29
  • 9
    Thanks. Yes, for example you can add this line before while $file->setFlags(SplFileObject::DROP_NEW_LINE); in order to drop newlines at the end of a line.
    – elshnkhll
    Nov 9, 2015 at 18:22
  • 3
    Thanks! Also, use rtrim($file->fgets()) to strip trailing newlines for each line string that is read if you don't want them.
    – racl101
    Nov 22, 2017 at 23:32
  • @Chud37 yes there is: php.net/manual/en/splfileobject.eof.php
    – Nathan F.
    Dec 9, 2019 at 15:19
  • 2
    Even shorter: foreach (new SplFileObject('file.txt') as $line) echo $line Oct 2, 2021 at 18:55
89

If you want to use foreach instead of while when opening a big file, you probably want to encapsulate the while loop inside a Generator to avoid loading the whole file into memory:

/**
 * @return Generator
 */
$fileData = function() {
    $file = fopen(__DIR__ . '/file.txt', 'r');

    if (!$file) {
        return; // die() is a bad practice, better to use return
    }    
    while (($line = fgets($file)) !== false) {
        yield $line;
    }

    fclose($file);
};

Use it like this:

foreach ($fileData() as $line) {
    // $line contains current line
}

This way you can process individual file lines inside the foreach().

Note: Generators require >= PHP 5.5

5
  • 4
    This should be an accepted answer instead. Its hundred times faster with generators.
    – Tachi
    Apr 12, 2018 at 8:06
  • 3
    And waaay more memory-efficient.
    – The Onin
    May 27, 2018 at 11:27
  • 2
    @NinoŠkopac: Can you explain why this solution is more memory-efficient? For instance, in comparison to the SplFileObject approach.
    – k00ni
    Apr 24, 2020 at 11:12
  • 1
    Not sure what Tachi and The Onin's comments are comparing against, but I ran this against a 90MB text file, compared with codadict's method and found this to be 44% slower and use the same amount of memory. (ran on PHP 7.3) Apr 14, 2021 at 16:50
  • @Tachi you are probably confusing something. This solution is neither "faster" or "slower" than the code in the accepted answer, let alone "hundred times". That's just a solution that allows one to use foreach instead of while, which looks nicer but inside it is using exactly the same while loop used in other answers May 10, 2022 at 13:07
37

There is a file() function that returns an array of the lines contained in the file.

foreach(file('myfile.txt') as $line) {
   echo $line. "\n";
}
7
  • 33
    The one GB file would be all read into memory and converted to a more than one GB array... good luck. Apr 15, 2015 at 9:07
  • 5
    This was not the answer to the question asked, but it does answer the more common question many people have when looking here, so it was still useful, thanks.
    – pilavdzice
    Apr 26, 2016 at 14:17
  • 3
    file() is very convenient for working with small files. Especially when you want an array() as the end result. Jun 16, 2017 at 0:06
  • 1
    this is a bad idea with bigger files as whole file is being read to an array at once Nov 30, 2017 at 19:03
  • 1
    This breaks badly on large files, so it is exactly the method that does not work.
    – ftrotter
    Aug 15, 2018 at 3:24
32

The obvious answer wasn't there in all the responses.
PHP has a neat streaming delimiter parser available made for exactly that purpose.

$fp = fopen("/path/to/the/file", "r");
while (($line = stream_get_line($fp, 1024 * 1024, "\n")) !== false) {
  echo $line;
}
fclose($fp);
3
  • This way I got the newline from the end of each line included. Aug 18, 2021 at 22:21
  • @ValterEkholm Yes, the newline from the end of each line becomes another normal character, as the delimiter is not the newline anymore. Sep 29, 2021 at 20:58
  • Use "r" and not "r+" that also requests write mode Jan 29, 2022 at 22:00
30

Use buffering techniques to read the file.

$filename = "test.txt";
$source_file = fopen( $filename, "r" ) or die("Couldn't open $filename");
while (!feof($source_file)) {
    $buffer = fread($source_file, 4096);  // use a buffer of 4KB
    $buffer = str_replace($old,$new,$buffer);
    ///
}
3
  • 2
    this deserves more love, as it will work with huge files, even files that have no carriage returns or exceedingly long lines...
    – Jimmery
    Jun 11, 2015 at 13:50
  • I wouldn't be surprised if the OP didn't really care about actual lines and just wanted to e.g. serve a download. In that case, this answer is just fine (and what most PHP coders would do anyway). Jan 19, 2016 at 10:46
  • Sir, How will you locate the file inside the fopen() by the way? Assuming we need to specify the url for opening! Feb 25, 2021 at 7:48
25
foreach (new SplFileObject(__FILE__) as $line) {
    echo $line;
}
1
  • 1
    Memory efficient compared to file().
    – Nobu
    Oct 8, 2019 at 7:39
9

One of the popular solutions to this question will have issues with the new line character. It can be fixed pretty easy with a simple str_replace.

$handle = fopen("some_file.txt", "r");
if ($handle) {
    while (($line = fgets($handle)) !== false) {
        $line = str_replace("\n", "", $line);
    }
    fclose($handle);
}
1
  • Using rtrim() is shorter for the same purpose :) And it is cross-platformed.
    – Vijit
    Aug 20, 2021 at 17:17
9

This how I manage with very big file (tested with up to 100G). And it's faster than fgets()

$block =1024*1024;//1MB or counld be any higher than HDD block_size*2
if ($fh = fopen("file.txt", "r")) { 
    $left='';
    while (!feof($fh)) {// read the file
       $temp = fread($fh, $block);  
       $fgetslines = explode("\n",$temp);
       $fgetslines[0]=$left.$fgetslines[0];
       if(!feof($fh) )$left = array_pop($lines);           
       foreach ($fgetslines as $k => $line) {
           //do smth with $line
        }
     }
}
fclose($fh);
4
  • 2
    how do you ensure that 1024*1024 block doesn't break in the middle of the line?
    – user151496
    Jul 29, 2018 at 20:35
  • 2
    @user151496 easy!! count... 1.2.3.4
    – El Don
    Aug 30, 2018 at 12:34
  • @OmarElDon what do you mean?
    – Codex73
    Apr 9, 2020 at 19:32
  • @user151496 I think the $left variable is there for that purpose. Buffering is usually faster so this is probably a better solution if you don't mind the added complexity. Jun 28, 2021 at 22:08
8

Be careful with the 'while(!feof ... fgets()' stuff, fgets can get an error (returnfing false) and loop forever without reaching the end of file. codaddict was closest to being correct but when your 'while fgets' loop ends, check feof; if not true, then you had an error.

8

SplFileObject is useful when it comes to dealing with large files.

function parse_file($filename)
{
    try {
        $file = new SplFileObject($filename);
    } catch (LogicException $exception) {
        die('SplFileObject : '.$exception->getMessage());
    }
    while ($file->valid()) {
        $line = $file->fgets();
        //do something with $line
    }

    //don't forget to free the file handle.
    $file = null;
}
2
<?php
echo '<meta charset="utf-8">';

$k= 1;
$f= 1;
$fp = fopen("texttranslate.txt", "r");
while(!feof($fp)) {
    $contents = '';
    for($i=1;$i<=1500;$i++){
        echo $k.' -- '. fgets($fp) .'<br>';$k++;
        $contents .= fgets($fp);
    }
    echo '<hr>';
    file_put_contents('Split/new_file_'.$f.'.txt', $contents);$f++;
}
?>
-9

Function to Read with array return

function read_file($filename = ''){
    $buffer = array();
    $source_file = fopen( $filename, "r" ) or die("Couldn't open $filename");
    while (!feof($source_file)) {
        $buffer[] = fread($source_file, 4096);  // use a buffer of 4KB
    }
    return $buffer;
}
1
  • 7
    This would create a single array of more than one GB in memory (good luck with it) divided not even in lines but in arbitrary 4096 character chunks. Why on earth would you want to do that? Apr 15, 2015 at 9:09

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