6

I'm to stupid right now to solve this problem...

I get a BCD number (every digit is an own 4Bit representation)

For example, what I want:

  • Input: 202 (hex) == 514 (dec)
  • Output: BCD 0x415

  • Input: 0x202

  • Bit-representation: 0010 0000 0010 = 514

What have I tried:

unsigned int uiValue = 0x202;
unsigned int uiResult = 0;
unsigned int uiMultiplier = 1;
unsigned int uiDigit = 0;


// get the dec bcd value
while ( uiValue > 0 )
{
    uiDigit= uiValue & 0x0F;
    uiValue >>= 4;
    uiResult += uiMultiplier * uiDigit;
    uiMultiplier *= 10;
}

But I know that's very wrong this would be 202 in Bit representation and then split into 5 nibbles and then represented as decimal number again

I can solve the problem on paper but I just cant get it in a simple C-Code

11
  • 1
    Can I suggest that, when dealing with bytes and nibbles, hex masks are easier to put into context? eg 0x0F is more obvious that 15 (at least to me!)
    – Andrew
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:10
  • I have added some more informations
    – Sagi
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:10
  • @Andrew thats so true, will change this. thx
    – Sagi
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:11
  • 1
    @Andrew: But he said uiValue = 202, not 0x202.... And if it was 0x202, then the BCD value would be decimal 202... Nov 6, 2012 at 9:13
  • 1
    @Sagi: Hence my answer below... Nov 6, 2012 at 9:19

10 Answers 10

14

You got it the wrong way round. Your code is converting from BCD to binary, just as your question's (original) title says. But the input and output values you provided are correct only if you convert from binary to BCD. In that case, try:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {

   int binaryInput = 0x202; 
   int bcdResult = 0;
   int shift = 0;

   printf("Binary: 0x%x (dec: %d)\n", binaryInput , binaryInput );

   while (binaryInput > 0) {
      bcdResult |= (binaryInput % 10) << (shift++ << 2);
      binaryInput /= 10;
   }

   printf("BCD: 0x%x (dec: %d)\n", bcdResult , bcdResult );
   return 0;
}

Proof: http://ideone.com/R0reQh

5
  • Thanks, thats what I needed :) it's nearly the same code as I had, but I went the wrong direction... Thanks
    – Sagi
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:43
  • Sorry, my previous comment is in error but I can't remove it.
    – PapaAtHome
    Oct 22, 2013 at 8:13
  • Thanks a lot, this has helped me. One small note: not sure if this was your objective, but the output BCD nibbles come out ordered "least significant first". In my case, I wanted the nibbles to come out "most significant first", so I had to shift each nibble left by an incrementing multiple of 4 (shift just after taking the modulo) and only then OR the pre-shifted nibble to the result. Note how the algorithm (%10, /=10) starts from the lowest-order decimal digits and proceeds to higher orders.
    – frr
    May 16, 2017 at 12:50
  • @frr - you are of course correct. It was a simple mistake, and I fixed the code. Thanks for reporting! May 17, 2017 at 19:49
  • 1
    For platforms which have a high cost to division instructions (arguably, all of them), you can restructure the while (binaryInput > 0) to a while (binaryInput > 9) and add any remainder up to 9 in binaryInput to the final value without dividing again. Aug 22, 2021 at 12:44
2

Try the following.

unsigned long toPackedBcd (unsigned int val)
{
  unsigned long bcdresult = 0; char i;


  for (i = 0; val; i++)
  {
    ((char*)&bcdresult)[i / 2] |= i & 1 ? (val % 10) << 4 : (val % 10) & 0xf;
    val /= 10;
  }
  return bcdresult;
}

Also one may try the following variant (although maybe little inefficient)

/*
Copyright (c) 2016 enthusiasticgeek<enthusiasticgeek@gmail.com> Binary to Packed BCD
This code may be used (including commercial products) without warranties of any kind (use at your own risk)
as long as this copyright notice is retained.
Author, under no circumstances, shall not be responsible for any code crashes or bugs.
Exception to copyright code: 'reverse string function' which is taken from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19853014/reversing-a-string-in-place-in-c-pointers#19853059
Double Dabble Algorithm for unsigned int explanation

255(binary) - base 10 -> 597(packed BCD) - base 16
     H|    T|    U|        (Keep shifting left)
               11111111
             1 1111111
            11 111111  
           111 11111
          1010 11111    <-----added 3 in unit's place (7+3 = 10) 
        1 0101 1111  
        1 1000 1111     <-----added 3 in unit's place (5+3 = 8)
       11 0001 111
      110 0011 11       
     1001 0011 11       <-----added 3 in ten's place (6+3 = 9)
   1 0010 0111 1  
   1 0010 1010 1        <-----added 3 in unit's place (7+3 = 10)
  10 0101 0101  -> binary 597 but bcd 255
  ^    ^    ^  
  |    |    |
  2    5    5   
*/
#include <stdio.h>   
#include <string.h>

//Function Prototypes
unsigned int binaryToPackedBCD (unsigned int binary); 
char * printPackedBCD(unsigned int bcd, char * bcd_string);

// For the following function see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19853014/reversing-a-string-in-place-in-c-pointers#19853059
void reverse(char *str);

//Function Definitions
unsigned int binaryToPackedBCD (unsigned int binary) {
  const unsigned int TOTAL_BITS = 32;
  /*Place holder for bcd*/
  unsigned int bcd = 0;
  /*counters*/
  unsigned int i,j = 0;
  for (i=0; i<TOTAL_BITS; i++) {
     /*
      Identify the bit to append  to LSB of 8 byte or 32 bit word -
      First bitwise AND mask with 1. 
      Then shift to appropriate (nth shift) place. 
      Then shift the result back to the lsb position. 
     */
      unsigned int binary_bit_to_lsb = (1<<(TOTAL_BITS-1-i)&binary)>>(TOTAL_BITS-1-i);
      /*shift by 1 place and append bit to lsb*/
      bcd = ( bcd<<1 ) | binary_bit_to_lsb;       
      /*printf("=> %u\n",bcd);*/
      /*Don't add 3 for last bit shift i.e. in this case 32nd bit*/
      if( i >= TOTAL_BITS-1) { 
      break;
      }
      /*else continue*/
      /* Now, check every nibble from LSB to MSB and if greater than or equal 5 - add 3 if so */
      for (j=0; j<TOTAL_BITS; j+=4) {
        unsigned int temp = (bcd & (0xf<<j))>>j;
        if(temp >= 0x5) {
        /*printf("[%u,%u], %u, bcd = %u\n",i,j, temp, bcd);*/
        /*Now, add 3 at the appropriate nibble*/
         bcd = bcd  + (3<<j);
        // printf("Now bcd = %u\n", bcd);
        }
      }
  }
  /*printf("The number is %u\n",bcd);*/
  return bcd;
}   

char * printPackedBCD(unsigned int bcd, char * bcd_string) {
  const unsigned int TOTAL_BITS = 32;
  printf("[LSB] =>\n");
   /* Now, check every nibble from LSB to MSB and convert to char* */
  for (unsigned int j=0; j<TOTAL_BITS; j+=4) {
  //for (unsigned int j=TOTAL_BITS-1; j>=4; j-=4) {
      unsigned int temp = (bcd & (0xf<<j))>>j;
      if(temp==0){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '0';      
      } else if(temp==1){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '1';
      } else if(temp==2){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '2';
      } else if(temp==3){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '3';
      } else if(temp==4){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '4';
      } else if(temp==5){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '5';
      } else if(temp==6){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '6';
      } else if(temp==7){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '7';
      } else if(temp==8){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '8';
      } else if(temp==9){
    bcd_string[j/4] = '9';
      } else {
    bcd_string[j/4] = 'X';
      }
      printf ("[%u - nibble] => %c\n", j/4, bcd_string[j/4]);
  }      
  printf("<= [MSB]\n");
  reverse(bcd_string);
  return bcd_string;
}

// For the following function see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19853014/reversing-a-string-in-place-in-c-pointers#19853059
void reverse(char *str)
{ 
    if (str != 0 && *str != '\0') // Non-null pointer; non-empty string
    {
    char *end = str + strlen(str) - 1; 
    while (str < end)
    {
        char tmp = *str; 
        *str++ = *end; 
        *end-- = tmp;
    } 
    }
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
  unsigned int number = 255;
  unsigned int bcd = binaryToPackedBCD(number);
  char bcd_string[8];
  printPackedBCD(bcd, bcd_string);
  printf("Binary (Base 10) = %u => Packed BCD (Base 16) = %u\n OR \nPacked BCD String = %s\n", number, bcd, bcd_string);
  return 0;
}
1
  • I test this function and it appears to work initially, but I haven't tried it for very large numbers or compared its efficiency with outher candidate algorithm to do the conversion from e.g. 11 to 17 or likewise. (My project is C code for the 7-segment LEDs of the Altera DE2 FPGA.) Mar 30, 2014 at 11:01
1

The real problem here is confusion of bases and units

The 202 should be HEX which equates to 514 decimal... and therefore the BCD calcs are correct

Binary code decimal will convert the decimal (514) into three nibble sized fields: - 5 = 0101 - 1 = 0001 - 4 = 0100

The bigger problem was that you have the title the wrong way around, and you are converting Uint to BCD, whereas the title asked for BCD to Unint

6
  • Andrew, it's not as complicated as that. No need to convert from hex to decimal to find the BCD value. Nov 6, 2012 at 9:20
  • NO, but I think it explains the confusion... 0x202 == 514(bcd) whereas 202(dec) == 202(bcd)
    – Andrew
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:23
  • @Andrew It's the other way, 0x202 == 202 (bcd).
    – nos
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:33
  • Eh? Lets go simpler... 10d = 0Ah = (0001 0000)BCD == "10"bcd not "0A"bcd... so how can 0x202 == 202 BCD?
    – Andrew
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:37
  • @Andrew 10d = 0Ah has a binary representation of 0000 1010 , so I guess it depends on whether his 202 means bcd, decimal or hex. Certainly uiValue = 202 is wrong, though the text says that it should be hex: Input: 202 (hex) If the input is 0x202 as the text says, the binary representaion of the input is 0000 0010 0000 0010, which we can convert easily to bcd.
    – nos
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:39
1

My 2 cents, I needed similar for a RTC chip which used BCD to encode the time and date info. Came up with the following macros that worked fine for the requirement:

#define MACRO_BCD_TO_HEX(x) ((BYTE) ((((x >> 4) & 0x0F) * 10) + (x & 0x0F)))

#define MACRO_HEX_TO_BCD(x) ((BYTE) (((x / 10 ) << 4) | ((x % 10))))

0

A naive but simple solution:

char buffer[16];
sprintf(buffer, "%d", var);
sscanf(buffer, "%x", &var);
7
  • Isn't this going to produce hex, where as the OP asked for BCD? They are not equivalent. I didn't down vote though. It's some body else
    – fkl
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:19
  • From the first revision of his question it was plain that he wanted to convert 202 to 514, It does just that.
    – panda-34
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:20
  • But he wants 514 BCD not 514 Hex
    – Andrew
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:26
  • @Andrew, he started wanting that after my answer, I answered the first revision, where he stated that only input was in BCD
    – panda-34
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:29
  • 2
    @nos, I don't know, should I answer the question in the title, in the question body or in the sample code. They're three different ones.
    – panda-34
    Nov 6, 2012 at 9:45
0

This is the solution that I developed and works great for embedded systems, like Microchip PIC microcontrollers:

#include <stdio.h>
void main(){
    unsigned int output = 0;
    unsigned int input;
    signed char a;
    //enter any number from 0 to 9999 here:
    input = 1265;
    for(a = 13; a >= 0; a--){
        if((output & 0xF) >= 5)
            output += 3;
        if(((output & 0xF0) >> 4) >= 5)
            output += (3 << 4);
        if(((output & 0xF00) >> 8) >= 5)
            output += (3 << 8);
        output = (output << 1) | ((input >> a) & 1);
    }
    printf("Input decimal or binary: %d\nOutput BCD: %X\nOutput decimal: %u\n", input, output, output);
}
0

This is my version for a n byte conversion:

//----------------------------------------------
// This function converts n bytes Binary (up to 8, but can be any size)
// value to n bytes BCD value or more.
//----------------------------------------------

void bin2bcdn(void * val, unsigned int8 cnt)
{
    unsigned int8  sz, y, buff[20];         // buff = malloc((cnt+1)*2);
    
    if(cnt > 8) sz = 64;                    // 8x8
    else        sz = cnt * 8 ;              // Size in bits of the data we shift
    
    memset(&buff , 0, sizeof(buff));        // Clears buffer
    memcpy(&buff, val, cnt);                // Copy the data to buffer

    while(sz && !(buff[cnt-1] & 0x80))      // Do not waste time with null bytes,
    {                                       // so search for first significative bit
        rotate_left(&buff, sizeof(buff));   // Rotate until we find some data
        sz--;                               // Done this one
    }
    while(sz--)                             // Anyting left?
    {
        for( y = 0; y < cnt+2; y++)         // Here we fix the nibbles
        {
            if(((buff[cnt+y] + 0x03) & 0x08) != 0) buff[cnt+y] += 0x03;
            if(((buff[cnt+y] + 0x30) & 0x80) != 0) buff[cnt+y] += 0x30;
        }
        rotate_left(&buff, sizeof(buff));   // Rotate the stuff
    }
    memcpy(val, &buff[cnt], cnt);           // Copy the buffer to the data
//  free(buff);       //in case used malloc
}   // :D Done
0
long bin2BCD(long binary) { // double dabble: 8 decimal digits in 32 bits BCD
  if (!binary) return 0;
  long bit = 0x4000000; //  99999999 max binary
  while (!(binary & bit)) bit >>= 1;  // skip to MSB

  long bcd = 0;
  long carry = 0;
  while (1) {
    bcd <<= 1;
    bcd += carry; // carry 6s to next BCD digits (10 + 6 = 0x10 = LSB of next BCD digit)
    if (bit & binary) bcd |= 1;
    if (!(bit >>= 1)) return bcd;
    carry = ((bcd + 0x33333333) & 0x88888888) >> 1; // carrys: 8s -> 4s
    carry += carry >> 1; // carrys 6s  
  }
}
0

Simple solution

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {

   int binaryInput = 514 ;      //0x202 
   int bcdResult = 0;
   int digit = 0;
   int i=1;

   printf("Binary: 0x%x (dec: %d)\n", binaryInput , binaryInput );

   while (binaryInput > 0) {
 
      digit = binaryInput %10;          //pick digit
      bcdResult = bcdResult+digit*i;
      i=16*i;
      binaryInput = binaryInput/ 10;
   }
   printf("BCD: 0x%x (dec: %d)\n", bcdResult , bcdResult );
   return 0;
}

Binary: 0x202 (dec: 514)

BCD: 0x514 (dec: 1300)

0

You can also try the following:

In every iteration the remainder ( represented as a nibble ) is positioned in its corresponding place.

uint32_t bcd_converter(int num)
{                          
  uint32_t temp=0;              
  int i=0;                 
  while(num>0){            
    temp|=((num%10)<<i);   
    i+=4;                  
    num/=10;               
  }                        
                           
  return temp;             
}                          

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