81

I can get all sub-items recursively using this command:

Get-ChildItem -recurse

But is there a way to limit the depth? If I only want to recurse one or two levels down for example?

107
0

You can try:

Get-ChildItem \*\*\*

This returns all items with a depth of two subfolders. Adding \* adds an additional subfolder to search in.

In line with the OP question to limit a recursive search using get-childitem you are required to specify all the depths that can be searched.

Get-ChildItem \*\*\*,\*\*,\*

Will return the children at each depth 2,1 and 0

| improve this answer | |
  • So awesome. I guess I've never needed to do this in PowerShell, but I know I have wished for it before in CMD.EXE. – aphoria Nov 6 '12 at 11:57
  • 14
    Seems like you have to do "-path \*\*\*,\*\*,\*" to pull in the intermediate depths. – Gerard ONeill Sep 4 '13 at 22:10
  • I tried it, yet it seems to go up instead of down. How can I use it generate a Folder Tree as in superuser.com/questions/258287/… ? Thank You. – Royi Jul 19 '16 at 11:34
  • 2
    To start the recursion from the current directory, a dot needs to be added at the beginning of each path. Get-ChildItem .\*\*\*,.\*\*,.\* At some point, by PowerShell 5.1, Get-ChildItem now has a -Depth parameter. – lit Apr 26 '19 at 14:55
62
0

As of powershell 5.0, you can now use the -Depth parameter in Get-ChildItem!

You combine it with -Recurse to limit the recursion.

Get-ChildItem -Recurse -Depth 2
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    It seems that the -Recurse switch is optional / implied when -Depth is specified. – Charlie Joynt Feb 14 '17 at 10:14
  • 6
    One thing I found with this that seems odd is -Exclude when included with -Depth negates the -Depth value. – ATek Mar 16 '17 at 17:29
  • 1
    @ssaviers The same problem happens with -Include as well. – Eternal21 Jun 24 '19 at 16:56
  • For what it's worth, the -Depth parameter seemed to be ignored when combining with wildcards. For example, gci c:\*.exe -Depth 1 returns files multiple subdirectories deep. – GuitarPicker Feb 14 at 13:57
  • Good to know! gci c:\ -filter *.exe -depth 1 would probably get you what you want @GuitarPicker I don't have a windows machine to test right now however – dee-see Feb 14 at 15:51
9
0

Try this function:

Function Get-ChildItemToDepth {
    Param(
        [String]$Path = $PWD,
        [String]$Filter = "*",
        [Byte]$ToDepth = 255,
        [Byte]$CurrentDepth = 0,
        [Switch]$DebugMode
    )

    $CurrentDepth++
    If ($DebugMode) {
        $DebugPreference = "Continue"
    }

    Get-ChildItem $Path | %{
        $_ | ?{ $_.Name -Like $Filter }

        If ($_.PsIsContainer) {
            If ($CurrentDepth -le $ToDepth) {

                # Callback to this function
                Get-ChildItemToDepth -Path $_.FullName -Filter $Filter `
                  -ToDepth $ToDepth -CurrentDepth $CurrentDepth
            }
            Else {
                Write-Debug $("Skipping GCI for Folder: $($_.FullName) " + `
                  "(Why: Current depth $CurrentDepth vs limit depth $ToDepth)")
            }
        }
    }
}

source

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It actually works. Sample invocation: Get-ChildItemToDepth -ToDepth 2 (working on the current directory) – Peter Mortensen Jan 10 '19 at 19:51
1
0

I tried to limit Get-ChildItem recursion depth using Resolve-Path

$PATH = "."
$folder = get-item $PATH 
$FolderFullName = $Folder.FullName
$PATHs = Resolve-Path $FolderFullName\*\*\*\
$Folders = $PATHs | get-item | where {$_.PsIsContainer}

But this works fine :

gci "$PATH\*\*\*\*"
| improve this answer | |
1
0

This is a function that outputs one line per item, with indentation according to depth level. It is probably much more readable.

function GetDirs($path = $pwd, [Byte]$ToDepth = 255, [Byte]$CurrentDepth = 0)
{
    $CurrentDepth++
    If ($CurrentDepth -le $ToDepth) {
        foreach ($item in Get-ChildItem $path)
        {
            if (Test-Path $item.FullName -PathType Container)
            {
                "." * $CurrentDepth + $item.FullName
                GetDirs $item.FullName -ToDepth $ToDepth -CurrentDepth $CurrentDepth
            }
        }
    }
}

It is based on a blog post, Practical PowerShell: Pruning File Trees and Extending Cmdlets.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

@scanlegentil I like this.
A little improvement would be:

$Depth = 2
$Path = "."

$Levels = "\*" * $Depth
$Folder = Get-Item $Path
$FolderFullName = $Folder.FullName
Resolve-Path $FolderFullName$Levels | Get-Item | ? {$_.PsIsContainer} | Write-Host

As mentioned, this would only scan the specified depth, so this modification is an improvement:

$StartLevel = 1 # 0 = include base folder, 1 = sub-folders only, 2 = start at 2nd level
$Depth = 2      # How many levels deep to scan
$Path = "."     # starting path

For ($i=$StartLevel; $i -le $Depth; $i++) {
    $Levels = "\*" * $i
    (Resolve-Path $Path$Levels).ProviderPath | Get-Item | Where PsIsContainer |
    Select FullName
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This will show all sub-folder names to the specified depth – kevro Jan 7 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    This appears to show items at a given depth, not up to a given depth. – sancho.s ReinstateMonicaCellio May 3 '15 at 13:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.