130

How do I check if a value is in an array in C#?

Like, I want to create an array with a list of printer names.

These will be fed to a method, which will look at each string in turn, and if the string is the same as a value in an array, do that action.

For example:

string[] printer = {"jupiter", "neptune", "pangea", "mercury", "sonic"};
foreach (p in printer)
{
   PrinterSetup(p);     
}

These are the names of the printers, they are being fed to the PrinterSetup method.

PrinterSetup will look sort of like this (some pseudocode):

public void PrinterSetup(printer)
{
   if (printer == "jupiter") 
   {
      Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC");
   }
}

How do I format if (printer == "jupiter") in a way that C# can recognize?

3
  • 4
    Try giving your parameter name a type (string) and it will be fine. – Jon Skeet Nov 6 '12 at 18:55
  • 2
    I'm kind of confused as the question. Are you asking how to check if a value is in an array, or how to do string-comparison in C#? If it's the latter, you would use printer.Equals("jupiter"). If it's the former, use linq and printer.Contains("jupiter") – newfurniturey Nov 6 '12 at 18:55
  • 1
    @newfurniturey Quite so ... the question is confused, the example code doesn't match the title, and thus the answers are likewise confused; why crap like this gets upvoted is beyond me. And there's no need to do printer.Equals("jupiter") ... The OP's code if (printer == "jupiter") works just fine ... as long as printer is declared to be a string, as Skeet notes. – Jim Balter May 3 '16 at 1:32

10 Answers 10

276

Add necessary namespace

using System.Linq;

Then you can use linq Contains() method

string[] printer = {"jupiter", "neptune", "pangea", "mercury", "sonic"};
if(printer.Contains("jupiter"))
{
    Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC"");
}
7
  • 2
    @0A0D. This answer is I think straight best one as simplest/shortest and well known way to achieve same thing (How do I check if a value is in an array in C#?) and efficient as well. No loop no extra method. Just a namespace is extra which is not a big thing. – Sami Nov 6 '12 at 19:22
  • 6
    @Sami: Linq uses loops internally. – user195488 Nov 6 '12 at 19:22
  • 2
    @0A0D Sam is probably referring to written code, not compiled instructions. Linq uses loops and methods internally, but from the coders point of view all that is hidden and does not need to be worried about. – Trisped Nov 6 '12 at 19:29
  • 1
    Right @0A0D. I meant coder/developer didnt need to right loop. Off course check from array needs a loop:) – Sami Nov 6 '12 at 19:29
  • 3
    This is certainly easy and recommendable. If you do not have access to Linq, or do not want to use Linq, you can rely on some explicit interface implementation of the array. Since .NET 1.1 we have ((IList)printer).Contains("Jupiter") which is non-generic (may box value types etc.) and works even for multi-dimensional arrays. And since .NET 2.0 we have the more magical ((IList<string>)printer).Contains("Jupiter") which is more type-safe. The Linq approach was new in .NET 3.5. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 8 '16 at 13:01
31
   string[] array = { "cat", "dot", "perls" };

// Use Array.Exists in different ways.
bool a = Array.Exists(array, element => element == "perls");
bool b = Array.Exists(array, element => element == "python");
bool c = Array.Exists(array, element => element.StartsWith("d"));
bool d = Array.Exists(array, element => element.StartsWith("x"));

// Display bools.
Console.WriteLine(a);
Console.WriteLine(b);
Console.WriteLine(c);
Console.WriteLine(d);
----------------------------output-----------------------------------

1)True 2)False 3)True 4)False

1
  • 6
    This should be the accepted answer. If you use an array, it is not completely unlikely, that performance does matter. In this case, Linq is often the wrong choice. – Philm May 12 '17 at 16:08
27

Add using System.Linq; at the top of your file. Then you can do:

if ((new [] {"foo", "bar", "baaz"}).Contains("bar"))
{

}  
2
  • This is a general example - can you provide one that matches the question better? – kaz May 21 '15 at 15:44
  • 12
    It may be a general example, but it's exactly what I was looking for. – Grant Birchmeier Jul 12 '17 at 20:19
8
    public static bool Contains(Array a, object val)
    {
        return Array.IndexOf(a, val) != -1;
    }
2
  • 2
    I like this. However, it will fail if a is a multidimensional array (such as new string[10, 20, 15] for example), with an exception. It will also fail with one-dimensional arrays that are not indexed from zero (such as Array.CreateInstance(typeof(string), new[] { 5, }, new[] { -2, }), rare in C# I admit), with a possibly wrong return value. These shortcomings are easy to fix with generics: public static bool Contains<TElement>(TElement[] a, TElement val) { return Array.IndexOf(a, val) != -1; } – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 8 '16 at 12:51
  • I like this, but only because it's without Linq and it confirms that IndexOf is the only thing left to use. – Bitterblue Mar 13 '20 at 9:31
7

Something like this?

string[] printer = {"jupiter", "neptune", "pangea", "mercury", "sonic"};
PrinterSetup(printer);

// redefine PrinterSetup this way:
public void PrinterSetup(string[] printer)
{
    foreach (p in printer.Where(c => c == "jupiter"))
    {
        Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC"");
    }
}
0
6

Note: The question is about arrays of strings. The mentioned routines are not to be mixed with the .Contains method of single strings.

I would like to add an extending answer referring to different C# versions and because of two reasons:

  • The accepted answer requires Linq which is perfectly idiomatic C# while it does not come without costs, and is not available in C# 2.0 or below. When an array is involved, performance may matter, so there are situations where you want to stay with Array methods.

  • No answer directly attends to the question where it was asked also to put this in a function (As some answers are also mixing strings with arrays of strings, this is not completely unimportant).

Array.Exists() is a C#/.NET 2.0 method and needs no Linq. Searching in arrays is O(n). For even faster access use HashSet or similar collections.

Since .NET 3.5 there also exists a generic method Array<T>.Exists() :

public void PrinterSetup(string[] printer)
{
   if (Array.Exists(printer, x => x == "jupiter"))
   {
      Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC");
   }
}

You could write an own extension method (C# 3.0 and above) to add the syntactic sugar to get the same/similar ".Contains" as for strings for all arrays without including Linq:

// Using the generic extension method below as requested.
public void PrinterSetup(string[] printer)
{
   if (printer.ArrayContains("jupiter"))
   {
      Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC");
   }
}

public static bool ArrayContains<T>(this T[] thisArray, T searchElement)
{
   // If you want this to find "null" values, you could change the code here
   return Array.Exists<T>(thisArray, x => x.Equals(searchElement));
}

In this case this ArrayContains() method is used and not the Contains method of Linq.

The elsewhere mentioned .Contains methods refer to List<T>.Contains (since C# 2.0) or ArrayList.Contains (since C# 1.1), but not to arrays itself directly.

2
  • 1
    I suggest to change name to ArrayContains() to avoid confusion with the Linq Contains() – peter.cyc Apr 22 '20 at 7:34
  • I´ve done this, although there are also arguments against: It is the basic idea of polymorphism to use the same name for different data types, Especially with a Linq-setting in mind. Using different names is not polymorph. But readibility and avoiding misunderstandings shall win, I think, so, yes. – Philm Jun 29 '20 at 16:18
3

You are just missing something in your method:

public void PrinterSetup(string printer)
{
   if (printer == "jupiter") 
   {
      Process.Start("BLAH BLAH CODE TO ADD PRINTER VIA WINDOWS EXEC"");
   }
}

Just add string and you'll be fine.

0
3

Not very clear what your issue is, but it sounds like you want something like this:

    List<string> printer = new List<string>( new [] { "jupiter", "neptune", "pangea", "mercury", "sonic" } );

    if( printer.Exists( p => p.Equals( "jupiter" ) ) )
    {
        ...
    }
2

Consider using HashSet<T> Class for the sake of lookup performance:

This method is an O(1) operation.

HashSet<T>.Contains Method (T), MSDN.

For example:

class PrinterInstaller
{
    private static readonly HashSet<string> PrinterNames = new HashSet<string>
        {
            "jupiter", "neptune", "pangea", "mercury", "sonic"
        };

    public void Setup(string printerName)
    {
        if (!PrinterNames.Contains(printerName))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Unknown printer name", "printerName");
        }
        // ...
    }
}
1

I searched now over 2h to find a nicely way how to find duplicates in a list and how to remove them. Here is the simplest answer:

//Copy the string array with the filtered data of the analytics db into an list
// a list should be easier to use
List<string> list_filtered_data = new List<string>(analytics_db_filtered_data);

// Get distinct elements and convert into a list again.
List<string> distinct = list_filtered_data.Distinct().ToList();

The Output will look like this: Duplicated Elements will be removed in the new list called distinct!

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