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I have a web application that has to perform a repeated tasks, Sending messages and alerts, I, already, use a script page do those tasks when it loaded in the browser i.e http://example.com/tasks.php and I included it by the mean of iframe in every page of my web application.

Now I want to change this to use CRON jobs because the first approach may leads to jam performance, So How could I make a CRON job that visits http://example.com/tasks.php. However, I don't want this CRON job creating output files such as day.*!

I host the application on shared hosting service that permits CRON jobs via cPanel.

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* * * * * wget -O - http://yoursite.com/tasks.php >/dev/null 2>&1

That should work for you. Just have a wget script that loads the page.

Using -O - means that the output of the web request will be sent to STDOUT (standard output)

by adding >/dev/null we instruct standard output to be redirect to a black hole. by adding 2>&1 we instruct STDERR (errors) to also be sent to STDOUT, and thus all output will be sent to a blackhole. (so it will load the website, but never write a file anywhere)

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  • what are all these asterisks at the begining – Ashkan Mobayen Khiabani Nov 4 '16 at 11:46
  • @AshkanMobayenKhiabani They are part of the cron syntax: nncron.ru/help/EN/working/cron-format.htm – Mitch Dempsey Nov 4 '16 at 18:49
  • The only solution that worked for me under Raspbian Stretch Lite. Perfect! :D – that-ben Dec 12 '17 at 17:04
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    One note: it's a good idea to quote the URL, if it contains a query it may not work without everything being quoted. – jackJoe Mar 30 '19 at 11:17
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You don't need the redirection, use only

* * * * * wget -qO /dev/null http://yoursite.com/tasks.php
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  • 1
    Why is the redirection not needed? – Bradley Flood Jun 16 '14 at 2:48
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    -q|--quiet Turn off Wget's output. – Diego Torres Milano Jun 16 '14 at 2:55
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    your command also use redirection but in other form -qO /dev/null, isn't it? – Pavel Nazarov Sep 22 '16 at 10:44
  • Strictly speaking, not a redirection as I/O redirection is a shell thing – Diego Torres Milano Sep 22 '16 at 14:37
20

You can use curl as is in this thread

For the lazy:

*/5 * * * * curl --request GET 'http://exemple.com/path/check.php?param1=1'

This will be executed every 5 minutes.

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10

You can also use the local commandline php-cli:

* * * * * php /local/root/path/to/tasks.php > /dev/null

It is faster and decrease load for your webserver.

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7

i use this commands

wget -q -O /dev/null "http://example.com/some/cron/job.php" > /dev/null 2>&1

Cron task:

* * * * * wget -q -O /dev/null "http://example.com/some/cron/job.php" > /dev/null 2>&1
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    This one need some explaining, but it works very well. Especially if, like me, you have an ampersand in your URL. Putting the url inside quotes is a solution. Why do you putt /dev/null before the url ? – Gfra54 Jul 1 '15 at 11:01
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    This is probably late reply but its never too late. Reason is: /dev/null is a special filesystem object that throws away everything written into it. Redirecting a stream into it means hiding an output. The 2>&1 part means "redirect both the output and the error streams". – Abbas Arif Mar 29 '16 at 0:05
  • Ok so, it means that the content of wget is redirected to /dev/null (so it is basically deleted and ignored) ? Thanks – Gfra54 Apr 19 '16 at 14:24
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    Yes output sent to /dev/null is ignored. – Abbas Arif Apr 20 '16 at 19:56
2

you can use this for url with parameters:

lynx -dump "http://vps-managed.com/tasks.php?code=23456"

lynx is available on all systems by default.

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  • -dump dumps the content of the page to file. That is a possibly undesired side effect. – Wicher Visser Jun 5 '16 at 11:56
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You can use this command:

links https://www.honeymovies.com
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1

U can try this :-


    wget -q -O - http://www.example.com/ >/dev/null 2>&1

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* * * * * wget --quiet https://example.com/file --output-document=/dev/null

I find --quiet clearer than -q, and --output-document=/dev/null clearer than -O - > /dev/null

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