65

Dart supports both named optional parameters and positional optional parameters. What are the differences between the two?

Also, how can you tell if an optional parameter was actually specified?

116

Dart has two types of optional parameters: named and positional. Before I discuss the differences, let me first discuss the similarities.

Dart's optional parameters are optional in that the caller isn't required to specify a value for the parameter when calling the function.

Optional parameters can only be declared after any required parameters.

Optional parameters can have a default value, which is used when a caller does not specify a value.

Positional optional parameters

A parameter wrapped by [ ] is a positional optional parameter. Here is an example:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, [int port=80]) {
  // ...
}

In the above code, port is optional and has a default value of 80.

You can call getHttpUrl with or without the third parameter.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080); // port == 8080
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');       // port == 80

You can specify multiple positional parameters for a function:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, [int port=80, int numRetries=3]) {
  // ...
}

The optional parameters are positional in that you can't omit port if you want to specify numRetries.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080, 5);

Of course, unless you know what 8080 and 5 are, it's hard to tell what those apparently magic numbers are. You can use named optional parameters to create more readable APIs.

Named optional parameters

A parameter wrapped by { } is a named optional parameter. Here is an example:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, {int port = 80}) {
  // ...
}

You can call getHttpUrl with or without the third parameter. You must use the parameter name when calling the function.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080); // port == 8080
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');             // port == 80

You can specify multiple named parameters for a function:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, {int port = 80, int numRetries = 3}) {
  // ...
}

Because named parameters are referenced by name, they can be used in an order different from their declaration.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080, numRetries: 5);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', numRetries: 5, port: 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', numRetries: 5);

I believe named parameters make for easier-to-understand call sites, especially when there are boolean flags or out-of-context numbers.

Checking if optional parameter was provided

Unfortunately, you cannot distinguish between the cases "an optional parameter was not provided" and "an optional parameter was provided with the default value".

Note: You may use positional optional parameters or named optional parameters, but not both in the same function or method. The following is not allowed.

thisFunctionWontWork(String foo, [String positonal], {String named}) {
  // will not work!
}
  • 4
    ? operator has been deprecated. I've found only scale==null condition in dart tutorial. (expr1 ? expr2 : expr3 still works) – Zdeněk Mlčoch Nov 29 '13 at 23:46
  • Loving the multiple named params for a function, this was hard to find! Would look even better in the constructors part of docs? ;) – willsquire Dec 10 '14 at 20:50
  • 1
    Default values should now be specified with = instead of :, according to dartlang.org/guides/language/…. – nbro Aug 14 '17 at 17:26
2

When the parameter of a function is specified using "paramName : value" syntax, then it is a named parameter. Such parameters can be rendered optional by enclosing them between [ and ] brackets. A rudimentary demonstration of this function can be demonstrated in the following Hello World program:

sayHello([String name = ' World!']) {
  print('Hello, ${name}');
}

void main() {
  sayHello('Govind');
}
-1

From doc we get that both positional and named parameters are optional, which means they all can be absent.

In my opinion, named parameters are more strict than positional ones. For example, if you declare such a method:

String say({String from, String msg})

Above from and msg are named parameters, when you call method say you must use say(from: "xx", msg: "xx"). The keys cannot be absent.

However if you use positional parameters, you are free.

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