Looking to perform an inner join on two different text files. Basically I'm looking for the inner join equivalent of the GNU join program. Does such a thing exist? If not, an awk or sed solution would be most helpful, but my first choice would be a Linux command.

Here's an example of what I'm looking to do

file 1:

0|Alien Registration Card LUA|Checklist Update
1|Alien Registration Card LUA|Document App Plan
2|Alien Registration Card LUA|SA Application Nbr
3|Alien Registration Card LUA|tmp_preapp-DOB
0|App - CSCE Certificate LUA|Admit Type
1|App - CSCE Certificate LUA|Alias 1
2|App - CSCE Certificate LUA|Alias 2
3|App - CSCE Certificate LUA|Alias 3
4|App - CSCE Certificate LUA|Alias 4

file 2:

Alien Registration Card LUA

Results:

0|Alien Registration Card LUA|Checklist Update
1|Alien Registration Card LUA|Document App Plan
2|Alien Registration Card LUA|SA Application Nbr
3|Alien Registration Card LUA|tmp_preapp-DOB
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Should not the file2 contain LUA at the end?

If yes, you can still use join:

join -t'|' -12 <(sort -t'|' -k2 file1) file2
  • Thank you! Yes it should (I've updated the question). I did not know that one can shell out and feed that result back in through stdin. Quite useful! – Dave Snigier Nov 7 '12 at 16:00
  • @DaveSnigier: You can always create a temp file, but Process Substitution is much shorter to type. – choroba Nov 7 '12 at 16:08

You may modify this script:

cat file2 | while read line; do
    grep $line file1 # or whatever you want to do with the $line variable
done

while loop reads file2 line by line and gives that line to the grep command that greps that line in file1. There're some extra output that maybe removed with grep options.

  • Very clever! I will be able to find many uses for this pattern beyond this immediate problem – Dave Snigier Nov 7 '12 at 15:58
  • 2
    Don't forget to quote $line. If it contains spaces, it could be expanded badly. Also, if you're looking for fixed string matching rather than regular expressions (remember, it's gREp), then use the -F option. – ghoti Nov 7 '12 at 16:09
  • 2
    This is just an inefficient paraphrase of this anwer by @glennjackman. (Yes, his was posted later.) A single grep which reads in the patterns and then checks the target file just once is vastly more efficient than running one grep for each pattern, especially of course for large inputs. – tripleee Dec 16 '15 at 10:21
  • @ghoti's comment could be more strongly worded. Even if your input contains no spaces, things could go horribly wrong if the input ever contains any shell metacharacter. TL;DR It' wrong to omit the quotes here. – tripleee Mar 30 '17 at 13:53
  • 1
    @ketil: No need; just use grep -Fx (-F = fixed-string (not regexp), -x = line-match). – wchargin Jul 16 at 5:10

Here's an awk option, so you can avoid the bash dependency (for portability):

$ awk -F'|' 'NR==FNR{check[$0];next} $2 in check' file2 file1

How does this work?

  • -F'|' -- sets the field separator
  • 'NR==FNR{check[$0];next} -- if the total record number matches the file record number (i.e. we're reading the first file provided), then we populate an array and continue.
  • $2 in check -- If the second field was mentioned in the array we created, print the line (which is the default action if no actions are provided).
  • file2 file1 -- the files. Order is important due to the NR==FNR construct.

Looks like you just need

grep -F -f file2 file1

You can use paste command to combine file :

paste [option] source files [>destination file]

for your example it would be

paste file1.txt file2.txt >result.txt
  • Close, but paste will only join on the line numbers of two files. I'm actually looking to join on a field in the file instead. – Dave Snigier Nov 7 '12 at 16:03

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