9

Say I have a two dimensional array: vectors[x][y], and the initial array structure looks like this:

vectors = [    
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,]
]

After some calculations, the data in the array is randomized. What is the fastest way and most efficient way to return the array to it's initial state?

I know that I could just hardcode the above zeroed array and set vectors equal to it again, but I also know that an algorithm such as:

for (var x = 0; x < vectors.length; x++) {
    for (var y = 0; y < vectors[x].length; y++) {
        vectors[x][y] = 0;
    }

}

is O(x * y).

So which is the better way? And is there a better, even faster/more efficient way to solve this?

And for the general case of zeroing a multi-dimensional array of any length, which is the best way? (I'm working in JavaScript if it matters)

7
  • 1
    possibly related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1295584/… – lc. Nov 7 '12 at 18:29
  • Have you tried both approaches and profiled each of them? – Dai Nov 7 '12 at 18:30
  • @lc. I'll always know the length of the array(s) beforehand, and they're be initialized by hand. For the particular case of my question, the array is a 5x5. – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 18:31
  • 1
    Why are we worried about the Big-O performance for a 5x5 array? You could unroll the entire nested loop I suppose. – A. Webb Nov 7 '12 at 18:35
  • @A.Webb: because of the pure theoretical interest! (which is why I also asked for the general case) – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 18:36
3

Here is my two cents:

I'd go with keeping a clean copy of your original array for fastest performance. You can either keep a referenced hard-coded copy

var vectorsOrig = [    
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
];

or do a dynamic clean clone of the initial array using slice ((recursively in your case for deep copy):

var clonedVectors = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0].slice(0);

Regardless, taking the approach of resetting your vector reference to an original copy will be faster than cycling through and resetting each node. If your old vector array object isn't referenced any more, JavaScript will garbage collect it.

With that said, the question becomes of obtaining a clean copy each and every time. Having once hard-coded instance will give you one clean copy and you'll have to clone it thereafter. Nor do you want to into dynamic generation via similar for loops as the reset option. My advice is to write a clone function that simply returns a new hard-coded or initialized array:

function newVector() {
    return [    
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
    ];
}
var vector = newVector();
vector[1][2] = 11;
console.dir(vector);
vector = newVector();  // your old array will be garbage-collected if no longer referenced by any other reference
console.dir(vector);

Ideally, it's best to benchmark various approach.

EDIT Thanks to Vega's input, I've modified his test to test three approaches. In Chrome and IE9, this solution seems to be the fastest, in FF (15.0.1) manual iteration seems faster (memory allocation/management slower in FF possibly). http://jsperf.com/array-zero-test/2

7
  • Unfortunately, slice seems to be slower than updating the nodes jsperf.com/array-zero-test – Selvakumar Arumugam Nov 7 '12 at 19:19
  • This looks like Mohammad Goudarzi's solution, though you explain your rationale a bit better. – 0x1F602 Nov 7 '12 at 19:22
  • Depends on the environment (browser). For Chrome 22.0.1229.96 32-bit on Windows Server 2008 R2 / 7 64-bit, it's faster. – cbayram Nov 7 '12 at 19:30
  • Is brute actually the fastest solution? I added map() to the pref, and suddenly brute is faster there for me, but newcopy is faster for me in test 2. Weird. @cbayram, could it be because when you hit "beautify" code in test 2, jspref added an extra, blank to each array: [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,],? Check out jsperf.com/array-zero-test/3. EDIT: And now brute is performing better than newcopy in test 2 as well... Interesting... – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 20:12
  • @ChrisBlake, depends on the environment. I'll personally stick to the newCopy as the fastest in most implementations. [0, 0, 0, 0, 0,] should really be [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], I missed that in the prev test. – cbayram Nov 7 '12 at 20:36
1

So far, it sounds like we have 2 possible choices.

  1. Overwrite the whole thing with zeroes. (Your solution)

  2. Keep a record of all modified elements and only reset those ones. record[0].x = 3; record[0].y = 5; and so on However, you'll still need to loop once through the record. To explain it further, I mean that each time an element in the array is set to a value, you should record that element's placement in the array. Then, using a loop, you can visit each element and set it to 0. So, if you had a sparse array, it would be more efficient.

Depending on the implementation, I can see why you would want #2 instead of #1...but if you seriously have a large enough matrix that you need to worry about analyzing the algorithm, you might consider doing some kind of server pre-processing.

5
  • I'm not particularly worried about who the data is going to be processed by. I was more intrigued as to which solution was the fastest in general. – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 18:42
  • I am willing to say that my second solution would perform in O(n) time where n is the number of modified elements. Worst-case performance being n = the entire array. – 0x1F602 Nov 7 '12 at 18:43
  • This looks like a particularly good solution, but I'm not quite sure I fully understand method #2. Could you reexplain it? – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 19:05
  • Thanks for the re-explanation. But how expensive is property access? for (var i=0;i<records.length;i++){ vectors[records[i].x][records[i].y]] = 0; } – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 19:52
  • In my algorithms course, you would say that memory access is 1 unit of time. So, to evaluate the code you just posted, I'd say var i = 0 is an assignment, 1 unit. i < records.length, a comparison 1 unit, i++, an addition 1 unit * records.length. records[i].x is one unit, records[i].y is one unit, and vectors[what][ever] is one unit in my mind. – 0x1F602 Nov 7 '12 at 19:57
0

Another different way of looking at the problem is to use a linear array and calculate the linear index from the x, y indices when you do your updates.

The initialization is then just a single for loop with time O(x+y)

1
  • 2
    Isn't this still O(x*y) because you still walk the entire array--even if it is represented as a single dimensional array? – 0x1F602 Nov 7 '12 at 18:57
0

If I were you, I'd have an empty one of the array and whenever I would reset the value I just replace the variable with the empty one. It costs you only another empty array if you have a lot to do with reseting and initialization again.

Update

Maybe this will help you through the way:

var empty = function() {
    return [
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
    ];
};

var vectors = new empty();

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    for (var x = 0; x < vectors.length; x++)
        for (var y = 0; y < vectors[x].length; y++)
            vectors[x][y] = x * y + 2; // Some values just for changing the array.

    vectors = new empty();
}

Cheers.

19
  • 1
    @ChrisBlake Check out this fiddle to understand what I am talking about jsfiddle.net/bFxYY – Selvakumar Arumugam Nov 7 '12 at 18:53
  • 1
    Hey @beta0x64 man! you didn't get my answer correctly! I think you should look again. The subject of the question is "Fastest way to reset a multidimensional array?" and also you are not the judge body. I think you got the answer wrong and my answer is not as simple as a hard code to reset the array. It's the javascript and everything is different here. It's all about the environment and the fastest way! COME OOOOON. – Rikki Nov 7 '12 at 19:00
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    @Vega: So there are reference-ish things in JavaScript! – chrisdotcode Nov 7 '12 at 19:02
  • 1
    @ChrisBlake, yes if you simply say var q = [0,1]; var p = q; and you modify p, q will be altered too. – 0x1F602 Nov 7 '12 at 19:04
  • 1
    Why do you have the new in new empty()? empty() will return a new array object as is. – cbayram Nov 7 '12 at 19:12
-1

I'll risk and say that the fastest way of assigning the same value to all elements is by calling Array.map().

But, there is a catch here. Note that this will have incredibly fast performance on browsers that have natively implemented that method, and will have just the usual performance in other browsers. Also note that .map() isn't available in some old browsers, so you'll need to use Underscore.js or any other library that provides that method.

1
  • 2
    Nah, even native map is slower than a for-loop usually – Bergi Nov 7 '12 at 20:14

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