114

From a dataframe like this

test <- data.frame('id'= rep(1:5,2), 'string'= LETTERS[1:10])
test <- test[order(test$id), ]
rownames(test) <- 1:10

> test
    id string
 1   1      A
 2   1      F
 3   2      B
 4   2      G
 5   3      C
 6   3      H
 7   4      D
 8   4      I
 9   5      E
 10  5      J

I want to create a new one with the first row of each id / string pair. If sqldf accepted R code within it, the query could look like this:

res <- sqldf("select id, min(rownames(test)), string 
              from test 
              group by id, string")

> res
    id string
 1   1      A
 3   2      B
 5   3      C
 7   4      D
 9   5      E

Is there a solution short of creating a new column like

test$row <- rownames(test)

and running the same sqldf query with min(row)?

4
  • possible duplicate of Collapsing data frame by selecting one row per group
    – Matthew
    Sep 2, 2014 at 1:56
  • 1
    @Matthew, my question is older.
    – dmvianna
    Sep 2, 2014 at 2:23
  • 2
    Your question is 1 year old, and the other question is 4 years old, no? There are so many duplicates of this question
    – Matthew
    Sep 2, 2014 at 2:34
  • @Matthew Sorry, I must have misread the dates.
    – dmvianna
    Sep 4, 2014 at 4:31

8 Answers 8

138

You can use duplicated to do this very quickly.

test[!duplicated(test$id),]

Benchmarks, for the speed freaks:

ju <- function() test[!duplicated(test$id),]
gs1 <- function() do.call(rbind, lapply(split(test, test$id), head, 1))
gs2 <- function() do.call(rbind, lapply(split(test, test$id), `[`, 1, ))
jply <- function() ddply(test,.(id),function(x) head(x,1))
jdt <- function() {
  testd <- as.data.table(test)
  setkey(testd,id)
  # Initial solution (slow)
  # testd[,lapply(.SD,function(x) head(x,1)),by = key(testd)]
  # Faster options :
  testd[!duplicated(id)]               # (1)
  # testd[, .SD[1L], by=key(testd)]    # (2)
  # testd[J(unique(id)),mult="first"]  # (3)
  # testd[ testd[,.I[1L],by=id] ]      # (4) needs v1.8.3. Allows 2nd, 3rd etc
}

library(plyr)
library(data.table)
library(rbenchmark)

# sample data
set.seed(21)
test <- data.frame(id=sample(1e3, 1e5, TRUE), string=sample(LETTERS, 1e5, TRUE))
test <- test[order(test$id), ]

benchmark(ju(), gs1(), gs2(), jply(), jdt(),
    replications=5, order="relative")[,1:6]
#     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
# 1   ju()            5    0.03    1.000      0.03     0.00
# 5  jdt()            5    0.03    1.000      0.03     0.00
# 3  gs2()            5    3.49  116.333      2.87     0.58
# 2  gs1()            5    3.58  119.333      3.00     0.58
# 4 jply()            5    3.69  123.000      3.11     0.51

Let's try that again, but with just the contenders from the first heat and with more data and more replications.

set.seed(21)
test <- data.frame(id=sample(1e4, 1e6, TRUE), string=sample(LETTERS, 1e6, TRUE))
test <- test[order(test$id), ]
benchmark(ju(), jdt(), order="relative")[,1:6]
#    test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
# 1  ju()          100    5.48    1.000      4.44     1.00
# 2 jdt()          100    6.92    1.263      5.70     1.15
12
  • The winner: system.time(dat3[!duplicated(dat3$id),]) user system elapsed 0.07 0.00 0.07
    – dmvianna
    Nov 7, 2012 at 23:18
  • 2
    @dmvianna: I don't have it installed and didn't feel like bothering with it. :) Nov 7, 2012 at 23:33
  • Are we sure that my data.table code is as efficient as possible? I'm not confident in my ability to eke the best performance out of that tool.
    – joran
    Nov 7, 2012 at 23:36
  • 2
    Also, I reckon, if you are going to benchmark the data.table , keying you should include the ordering by id within the base calls.
    – mnel
    Nov 8, 2012 at 0:42
  • 1
    @JoshuaUlrich One more question: why is the first sentence needed i.e. assumption that data is already sorted. !duplicated(x) finds the first of each group even if it isn't sorted, iiuc.
    – Matt Dowle
    Nov 8, 2012 at 9:24
77

I favor the dplyr approach.

group_by(id) followed by either

  • filter(row_number()==1) or
  • slice(1) or
  • slice_head(1) #(dplyr => 1.0)
  • top_n(n = -1)
    • top_n() internally uses the rank function. Negative selects from the bottom of rank.

In some instances arranging the ids after the group_by can be necessary.

library(dplyr)

# using filter(), top_n() or slice()

m1 <-
test %>% 
  group_by(id) %>% 
  filter(row_number()==1)

m2 <-
test %>% 
  group_by(id) %>% 
  slice(1)

m3 <-
test %>% 
  group_by(id) %>% 
  top_n(n = -1)

All three methods return the same result

# A tibble: 5 x 2
# Groups:   id [5]
     id string
  <int> <fct> 
1     1 A     
2     2 B     
3     3 C     
4     4 D     
5     5 E
4
  • 3
    Worth giving a shout-out to slice as well. slice(x) is a shortcut for filter(row_number() %in% x). Jun 20, 2018 at 18:53
  • Very elegant. Do you know why I have to convert my data.table to a data.frame for this to work? Jan 13, 2019 at 3:09
  • @JamesHirschorn I'm not an expert on the all the differences. But data.table inherits from the data.frame so in many cases you can use dplyr commands on a data.table. The example above e.g also works if test is a data.table. See e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/13618488/… for a deeper explanantion
    – Kresten
    Jan 14, 2019 at 9:06
  • This is a tidyverse way to do it and as you see the data.frame is actually a tibble here. I personally advise you to work always with tibbles also because ggplot2 is built in a similar manner.
    – Garini
    Jan 15, 2020 at 10:28
18

What about

DT <- data.table(test)
setkey(DT, id)

DT[J(unique(id)), mult = "first"]

Edit

There is also a unique method for data.tables which will return the the first row by key

jdtu <- function() unique(DT)

I think, if you are ordering test outside the benchmark, then you can removing the setkey and data.table conversion from the benchmark as well (as the setkey basically sorts by id, the same as order).

set.seed(21)
test <- data.frame(id=sample(1e3, 1e5, TRUE), string=sample(LETTERS, 1e5, TRUE))
test <- test[order(test$id), ]
DT <- data.table(DT, key = 'id')
ju <- function() test[!duplicated(test$id),]

jdt <- function() DT[J(unique(id)),mult = 'first']


 library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(ju(), jdt(), replications = 5)
##    test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self 
## 2 jdt()            5    0.01        1      0.02        0        
## 1  ju()            5    0.05        5      0.05        0         

and with more data

** Edit with unique method**

set.seed(21)
test <- data.frame(id=sample(1e4, 1e6, TRUE), string=sample(LETTERS, 1e6, TRUE))
test <- test[order(test$id), ]
DT <- data.table(test, key = 'id')
       test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self 
2  jdt()            5    0.09     2.25      0.09     0.00    
3 jdtu()            5    0.04     1.00      0.05     0.00      
1   ju()            5    0.22     5.50      0.19     0.03        

The unique method is fastest here.

2
  • 5
    You don't even have to set the key. unique(DT,by="id") works directly
    – Matthew
    Sep 2, 2014 at 1:43
  • FYI as of data.table version >= 1.9.8, the default by argument for unique is by = seq_along(x) (all columns), instead of the previous default by = key(x) Dec 31, 2018 at 21:03
15

A simple ddply option:

ddply(test,.(id),function(x) head(x,1))

If speed is an issue, a similar approach could be taken with data.table:

testd <- data.table(test)
setkey(testd,id)
testd[,.SD[1],by = key(testd)]

or this might be considerably faster:

testd[testd[, .I[1], by = key(testd]$V1]
4
  • Surprisingly, sqldf does it faster: 1.77 0.13 1.92 vs 10.53 0.00 10.79 with data.table
    – dmvianna
    Nov 7, 2012 at 23:21
  • 3
    @dmvianna I wouldn't necessarily count out data.table. I'm not an expert with that tool, so my data.table code may not be the most efficient way to go about that.
    – joran
    Nov 7, 2012 at 23:26
  • I upvoted this prematurely. When I ran it on a large data.table, it was ridiculously slow and it didn't work: the number of rows was the same after. Jan 13, 2019 at 3:07
  • @JamesHirachorn I wrote this a long time ago, the package has changed a lot, and I hardly use data.table at all. If you find the right way to do this with that package, feel free to suggest an edit to make it better.
    – joran
    Jan 13, 2019 at 5:04
10

now, for dplyr, adding a distinct counter.

df %>%
    group_by(aa, bb) %>%
    summarise(first=head(value,1), count=n_distinct(value))

You create groups, them summarise within groups.

If data is numeric, you can use:
first(value) [there is also last(value)] in place of head(value, 1)

see: http://cran.rstudio.com/web/packages/dplyr/vignettes/introduction.html

Full:

> df
Source: local data frame [16 x 3]

   aa bb value
1   1  1   GUT
2   1  1   PER
3   1  2   SUT
4   1  2   GUT
5   1  3   SUT
6   1  3   GUT
7   1  3   PER
8   2  1   221
9   2  1   224
10  2  1   239
11  2  2   217
12  2  2   221
13  2  2   224
14  3  1   GUT
15  3  1   HUL
16  3  1   GUT

> library(dplyr)
> df %>%
>   group_by(aa, bb) %>%
>   summarise(first=head(value,1), count=n_distinct(value))

Source: local data frame [6 x 4]
Groups: aa

  aa bb first count
1  1  1   GUT     2
2  1  2   SUT     2
3  1  3   SUT     3
4  2  1   221     3
5  2  2   217     3
6  3  1   GUT     2
1
  • This answer is quite dated - there are better ways to do this with dplyr that don't require writing a statement for every single column to be included (see atomman's answer below, for example). Also I'm not sure what *"if data is numeric"* has anything to do with whether or not one would use first(value)` vs head(value) (or just value[1]) Jun 20, 2018 at 18:56
7

(1) SQLite has a built in rowid pseudo-column so this works:

sqldf("select min(rowid) rowid, id, string 
               from test 
               group by id")

giving:

  rowid id string
1     1  1      A
2     3  2      B
3     5  3      C
4     7  4      D
5     9  5      E

(2) Also sqldf itself has a row.names= argument:

sqldf("select min(cast(row_names as real)) row_names, id, string 
              from test 
              group by id", row.names = TRUE)

giving:

  id string
1  1      A
3  2      B
5  3      C
7  4      D
9  5      E

(3) A third alternative which mixes the elements of the above two might be even better:

sqldf("select min(rowid) row_names, id, string 
               from test 
               group by id", row.names = TRUE)

giving:

  id string
1  1      A
3  2      B
5  3      C
7  4      D
9  5      E

Note that all three of these rely on a SQLite extension to SQL where the use of min or max is guaranteed to result in the other columns being chosen from the same row. (In other SQL-based databases that may not be guaranteed.)

1
  • Thanks! This is much better than the accepted answer IMO because it's generalizable to taking the first/last element in an aggregate step using multiple aggregate functions (i.e. take the first of this variable, sum that variable, etc). Mar 10, 2015 at 17:01
5

A base R option is the split()-lapply()-do.call() idiom:

> do.call(rbind, lapply(split(test, test$id), head, 1))
  id string
1  1      A
2  2      B
3  3      C
4  4      D
5  5      E

A more direct option is to lapply() the [ function:

> do.call(rbind, lapply(split(test, test$id), `[`, 1, ))
  id string
1  1      A
2  2      B
3  3      C
4  4      D
5  5      E

The comma-space 1, ) at the end of the lapply() call is essential as this is equivalent of calling [1, ] to select first row and all columns.

5
  • This was very slow, Gavin: user system elapsed 91.84 6.02 101.10
    – dmvianna
    Nov 7, 2012 at 23:22
  • Anything involving data frames will be. Their utility comes at a price. Hence data.table, for example. Nov 7, 2012 at 23:32
  • in my defence, and R's, you didn't mention anything about efficiency in the question. Often ease of use is a feature. Witness the popularity of ply, which is "slow" too, at least until the next version that has data.table support. Nov 8, 2012 at 7:10
  • 1
    I agree. I didn't mean to insult you. I did find, though, that @Joshua-Ulrich's method was both fast and easy. :7)
    – dmvianna
    Nov 8, 2012 at 9:04
  • No need to apologise and I didn't take it as an insult. Was just pointing out that it was offered without any claim of efficiency. Remember this Stack Overflow Q&A is not just for your benefit but that of other users who come across your question as they have a similar problem. Nov 8, 2012 at 9:09
0

From dplyr 1.1.0, you can use inline grouping with slice_head's by argument:

slice_head(test, n = 1, by = id)

#   id string
# 1  1      A
# 2  2      B
# 3  3      C
# 4  4      D
# 5  5      E

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