23

I have a piece of software that generates code for a C# project based on user actions. I would like to create a GUI to automatically compile the solution so I don't have to load up Visual Studio just to trigger a recompile.

I've been looking for a chance to play with Roslyn a bit and decided to try and use Roslyn instead of msbuild to do this. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find any good resources on using Roslyn in this fashion.

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

24

You can load the solution by using Roslyn.Services.Workspace.LoadSolution. Once you have done so, you need to go through each of the projects in dependency order, get the Compilation for the project and call Emit on it.

You can get the compilations in dependency order with code like below. (Yes, I know that having to cast to IHaveWorkspaceServices sucks. It'll be better in the next public release, I promise).

using Roslyn.Services;
using Roslyn.Services.Host;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var solution = Solution.Create(SolutionId.CreateNewId()).AddCSharpProject("Foo", "Foo").Solution;
        var workspaceServices = (IHaveWorkspaceServices)solution;
        var projectDependencyService = workspaceServices.WorkspaceServices.GetService<IProjectDependencyService>();
        var assemblies = new List<Stream>();
        foreach (var projectId in projectDependencyService.GetDependencyGraph(solution).GetTopologicallySortedProjects())
        {
            using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                solution.GetProject(projectId).GetCompilation().Emit(stream);
                assemblies.Add(stream);
            }
        }
    }
}

Note1: LoadSolution still does use msbuild under the covers to parse the .csproj files and determine the files/references/compiler options.

Note2: As Roslyn is not yet language complete, there will likely be projects that don't compile successfully when you attempt this.

  • Is there a convenient way of determining the dependency order (like sln.ProjectsInDependencyOrder) or is this something I would have to implement on my own? (e.g. Going through project-references and building a dependency tree) – NobodysNightmare Apr 23 '13 at 13:18
  • 1
    There is an IProjectDependencyService that has GetTopologicallySortedProjects(). I don't have a computer handy to check exactly how to get it, but will update later. – Kevin Pilch Apr 24 '13 at 21:56
  • Edited the answer to add some code. – Kevin Pilch Apr 29 '13 at 4:00
  • 5
    This solution doesn't work in the current preview 1.0.0-beta1-20141031-01. Roslyn.Services.Workspace.LoadSolution() doesn't exist, neither does Solution.Create(). I think you have to use MSBuildWorkspace.Create along with OpenSolutionAsync (for existing sln) or just workspace.CurrentSolution for empty one. As well, you'll need to install the MSBuild 2015 tools from microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=44931 in order to use an MSBuildWorkspace. Or, you can MEF export a catalog and use CustomWorkspace. The whole process has gotten much more complicated it seems – Josh E Dec 2 '14 at 16:39
  • To add to @JoshE's comment, the Solution class now has a GetProjectDependencyGraph method that does all of this, once you have the Solution object. – Grault Dec 23 '15 at 19:13
13

I also wanted to compile a full solution on the fly. Building from Kevin Pilch-Bisson's answer and Josh E's comment, I wrote code to compile itself and write it to files.

Software Used

Visual Studio Community 2015 Update 1

Microsoft.CodeAnalysis v1.1.0.0 (Installed using Package Manager Console with command Install-Package Microsoft.CodeAnalysis).

Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using Microsoft.CodeAnalysis;
using Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.Emit;
using Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.MSBuild;

namespace Roslyn.TryItOut
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string solutionUrl = "C:\\Dev\\Roslyn.TryItOut\\Roslyn.TryItOut.sln";
            string outputDir = "C:\\Dev\\Roslyn.TryItOut\\output";

            if (!Directory.Exists(outputDir))
            {
                Directory.CreateDirectory(outputDir);
            }

            bool success = CompileSolution(solutionUrl, outputDir);

            if (success)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Compilation completed successfully.");
                Console.WriteLine("Output directory:");
                Console.WriteLine(outputDir);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Compilation failed.");
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press the any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static bool CompileSolution(string solutionUrl, string outputDir)
        {
            bool success = true;

            MSBuildWorkspace workspace = MSBuildWorkspace.Create();
            Solution solution = workspace.OpenSolutionAsync(solutionUrl).Result;
            ProjectDependencyGraph projectGraph = solution.GetProjectDependencyGraph();
            Dictionary<string, Stream> assemblies = new Dictionary<string, Stream>();

            foreach (ProjectId projectId in projectGraph.GetTopologicallySortedProjects())
            {
                Compilation projectCompilation = solution.GetProject(projectId).GetCompilationAsync().Result;
                if (null != projectCompilation && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(projectCompilation.AssemblyName))
                {
                    using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
                    {
                        EmitResult result = projectCompilation.Emit(stream);
                        if (result.Success)
                        {
                            string fileName = string.Format("{0}.dll", projectCompilation.AssemblyName);

                            using (FileStream file = File.Create(outputDir + '\\' + fileName))
                            {
                                stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
                                stream.CopyTo(file);
                            }
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            success = false;
                        }
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    success = false;
                }
            }

            return success;
        }
    }
}
  • No value for RuntimeMetadataVersion found. No assembly containing System.Object was found nor was a value for RuntimeMetadataVersion specified through options. – Aflred Apr 15 '17 at 23:00
  • FYI to use this example you will also need to install Microsoft.Build.Tasks.Core and Microsoft.Build Packages – Flatliner DOA Jul 18 '17 at 3:16
  • 1
    This appears to be a much better answer as the roslyn.services namespace is obsolete. – Timothy Gonzalez Oct 14 '17 at 15:02
  • 1
    The outputting of the result of the compilation to disk can be simplified significantly. Instead of creating a MemoryStream and formatting a file name and creating a FileStream and copying the memory stream to the file stream you can split one statement into two: Project project = solution.GetProject(projectId); Compilation projectCompilation = project.GetCompilationAsync().Result; and then a bit later simply specify projectCompilation.Emit(project.OutputFilePath). (This does assume the .csproj file correctly specifies the output file.) – RenniePet Mar 2 '18 at 7:57
  • As per gist.github.com/DustinCampbell/32cd69d04ea1c08a16ae5c4cd21dd3a3, you need to reference the NuGet package Microsoft.Build.Locator and call MSBuildLocator.RegisterDefaults(). In my experience, not doing this results in a Compilation without any framework references in it. – Pathogen David Jun 23 '18 at 14:49

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