2

This is a simple implementation of a sort algorithm. My question is. The array numbers, is declared and initialized in main. Then, I pass it like an argument in the function sort (Is a copy ?). Inside the sort function, numbers, now called array (a copy, as far as I know), is changed (sorted). So, why, after calling the function, the array numbers is changed (this is what I want, buy want to know why??. array scope is in sort, not main.

int main(void)
{
    int numbers[SIZE] = { 4, 15, 16, 50, 8, 23, 42, 108 };
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        printf("%d ", numbers[i]);
    printf("\n");

    sort(numbers, SIZE);

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        printf("%d ", numbers[i]);
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}
void sort(int array[], int size)
{
    int swaps = 0;

    while(swaps==0)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < size ; i++)
        {
            for(int j = i + 1; j < size ; j++)
            {
                if( array[i] > array[j] )
                {
                    // Swapping
                    int temp = array[i]; 
                    array[i] = array[j];
                    array[j] = temp;

                    swaps ++;
                }   
            }
        }
    }    
}
6

int array[] is the same as int *array. You are passing a pointer.

3
  • 1
    Arrays in C are implemented as a pointer to the their first element. If you want a copy, you'll have to create one. – tommyo Nov 8 '12 at 0:12
  • 5
    That's not quite correct. In many circumstances, arrays are converted to pointers to their first element, but arrays and pointers are very much not the same. In a function prototype, however int array[] is indeed just another way to write int *array. – Daniel Fischer Nov 8 '12 at 0:15
  • Well then; when passing an array in a function call, you're stuck with a pointer to the first element. This is called array decay. Furthermore, the index operator is really just the address of the first element, and an offset multiplied with the padded size of the element type. I hope this makes a bit more clear (for op). – tommyo Nov 8 '12 at 0:19
1

You have passed the array by reference, so any operations to it WILL affect that place in memory.

1

void sort(int array[], int size) passes a reference to the array, ie you are passing a pointer to it (as @pst rightly pointed out, this is not an exact terminology, C always passes by value)- not a copy of the array. Any modification you make will modify the original array.

If you want not to modify the original array, copy it and pass the copy.

Another (more efficient) way is to allocate from the caller, and pass the pointer to the function:

void sort(int *const array,int [] result, int size)

This is in particular convenient if your algorithm does not require to work "in place".

Note that creating the copy inside the function and passing the pointer to the copy back as return value is technically feasible but really really really discouraged

  • you cannot allocate an int[] inside the function and return it because it will be out of scope
  • you can do a malloc, but then you have to remember to free it from the caller function, which is easy to forget
7
  • No, it's not ".. by reference" :( There is no no need to say "reference" in an answer. If you wish to get me to remove my -1 for this usage, please provide a reference to K&R, the C specification, or another notable source pertaining to C that establishes this as correct and/or acceptable parlance. – user166390 Nov 8 '12 at 0:20
  • Sorry, we do not seem to agree on the terminology. Pass "by reference" is a concept, a pointer is a reference to an area of memory by its address. Even if, technically what you do is to pass a pointer by value, still, it is a reference. – thedayofcondor Nov 8 '12 at 0:26
  • Please see Call By Reference. It is actually not the same. In some languages the language specific parlance is "Pass by Reference" (I think this is common in Python) although "Call by [Object] Sharing" is a much better term in most cases .. excepting where real reference semantics are used (e.g. ByRef in VB, &ref in C++, ref/out in C#, etc.). In Java the acceptable terminology for this is - AFAIK - "Pass the Reference by Value" .. anyway, one should be mindful of the language and try to avoid ambiguity. – user166390 Nov 8 '12 at 0:27
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(programming_language): Function parameters are always passed by value. Pass-by-reference is simulated in C by explicitly passing pointer values – thedayofcondor Nov 8 '12 at 0:28
  • @pst Even in your own link - Even among languages that don't exactly support call-by-reference, many, including C and ML, support explicit references (objects that refer to other objects), such as pointers (objects representing the memory addresses of other objects), and these can be used to effect or simulate call-by-reference (but with the complication that a function's caller must explicitly generate the reference to supply as an argument). – thedayofcondor Nov 8 '12 at 0:33
-2

In C, there are two different ways to pass parameters to functions/methods. - Passing value - Passing pointers

Passing values has the advantage of providing a copy to the function that can be modified by it. The downside (for large objects) is that it's slower as the data needs to be copied.

Passing pointers is much faster (than copying large objects) as the values aren't copied. But if the called function modifies the value, the original variable is changed too. This is sometimes done intentionally (e.g. in your sort function or in functions that return more than one value).

edit: Apparently I mixed up something here, so I tried to fix that... Originally I was talking about "call by reference" and "call by value" but C actually doesn't support references. Read the comments for further details.

3
  • 3
    Oh no you didn't! It is not Call by Reference. C++ has that (Call by Reference). Not C. C just allows mutation of an object in memory. C passes a value of a pointer .. by value. This pointer (masked behind an array type here) is used an as indirect lookup to perform side-effects. (Please read the Wikipedia article.) – user166390 Nov 8 '12 at 0:14
  • 1
    Also, C allows you to pass unions and structs to a function as immediate values. If you want to modify the struct, you would have to pass a pointer-to-struct, but if you just want to read it, you can directly pass a struct. – Cloud Nov 8 '12 at 0:24
  • Thanks for the clarifications. I mixed some of the stuff I learned back in school several years ago. I hope you're happier with this version... – mreithub Nov 8 '12 at 0:38

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