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Possible Duplicate:
Postgres Dynamic Query Function

I wish to use the returned string from the query below as a table name for other query.

SELECT 'backup_' || TO_CHAR(CURRENT_DATE,'yyyy-mm-dd')

as you can see it returns a string. I wish to use it as an input for another query, e.g.

CREATE TABLE (SELECT 'backup_' || TO_CHAR(CURRENT_DATE,'yyyy-mm-dd')) 
AS * SELECT FROM backup

Can it be done? Any clue how?

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  • I have solution that do not apply stackoverflow.com/questions/10639963/… but interesting for this issue : SELECT '"backup_' || TO_CHAR(CURRENT_DATE,'yyyy-mm-dd') || '"' AS tname; \gset CREATE TABLE :tname AS SELECT * FROM backup; Feb 22, 2017 at 19:33

1 Answer 1

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You will need to use the PL/PgSQL EXECUTE statement, via a DO block or PL/PgSQL function (CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION ... LANGUAGE plpgsql). Dynamic SQL is not supported in the ordinary SQL dialect used by PostgreSQL, only in the procedural PL/PgSQL variant.

DO
$$
BEGIN
EXECUTE format('CREATE TABLE %I AS SELECT * FROM backup', 'backup_' || to_char(CURRENT_DATE,'yyyy-mm-dd'));
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

The format(...) function's %I and %L format-specifiers do proper identifier and literal quoting, respectively.

For literals I recommend using EXECUTE ... USING rather than format(...) with %L, but for identifiers like table/column names the format %I pattern is a nice concise alternative to verbose quote_ident calls.

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  • 1
    Will the name automatically be quoted if it contains special characters? I'm not really a PostgreSQL user, but it seems doubtful that a simple FORMAT() function would be clever enough to do that.
    – Andriy M
    Nov 8, 2012 at 15:54
  • 3
    @AndriyM The %I interpolation placeholder in the format() function is specifically for postgres identifiers and will safely quote the supplied value.
    – dbenhur
    Nov 8, 2012 at 19:27
  • @dbenhur: Oh, good, thanks. Nice solution then, Craig! (apparently :)
    – Andriy M
    Nov 8, 2012 at 19:58

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