16

with Java based configuration, i am trying to convert a map that maps enums to bean references to be in pure java config (currently in XML & works) but can't seem to find anything in the documentations;

Currently, my XML like so;

<util:map id="colourHanders" key-type="com.example.ColourEnum"
          value-type="com.example.ColourHandler">
    <entry key="white" value-ref="whiteColourHandler"/>
    <entry key="blue" value-ref="blueColourHandler"/>
    <entry key="red" value-ref="redColourHandler"/>
</util:map>

I'm sure it is easy but again, can't find anything on the subject of how to represent this in Pure Java (so I don't have any XML configuration files)..

Note; the ColourHandler beans are created using the @Component annotation, e.g..

@Component
public class RedColourHandler implements ColourHander{
.....
}

and the map of colourHandlers is referenced as so;

@Resource(name="colourHandlers")
    private Map<ColourHandlerEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers;

Thanks,

Ian.

2
  • Is that what you tried? What error did it produce? – Ian Roberts Nov 8 '12 at 16:33
  • Sorry - this is the working very in XML and currently i'm still using the XML representation and importing but I want to convert it to pure Java and have no XML configuration files – Mannie Nov 8 '12 at 16:35
15

You probably want something like this:

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
    @Bean public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers() {
        Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> map = new EnumMap<>();
        map.put(WHITE, whiteHandler());
        // etc
        return map;
    }

    @Bean public ColourHandler whiteHandler() {
        return new WhiteHandler();
    }
}

If you need to keep your handlers as @Components, then you can autowire them into the configuration class:

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
    @Autowired private WhiteColourHandler whiteColourHandler;

    @Bean public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers() {
        Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> map = new EnumMap<>();
        map.put(WHITE, whiteColourHandler);
        return map;
    }
}
11
  • This works but there are two drawbacks: Map gets a prototype and no autowiring of WhiteHandler will happen. – Aaron Digulla Nov 8 '12 at 16:44
  • 2
    No, whiteHandler() will provide a singleton which will be wired into the Map. Spring uses cglib to rewrite @Configuration classes, so the code in your source file isn't the code that gets executed. – hertzsprung Nov 8 '12 at 16:53
  • 2
    Spring rewrites all @Bean annotated methods. Try calling the whiteHandler() method twice and you'll see that you receive the same singleton instance: gist.github.com/4040071 – hertzsprung Nov 8 '12 at 16:56
  • 1
    Indeed, @AaronDigulla see here for details on this behaviour. – Jonathan Nov 8 '12 at 17:00
  • 3
    When using enums as a key, you should always use EnumMap instead of HashMap. It's much more efficient! – Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 8 '12 at 17:04
4

Since you already have a unique class/@Component for each ColorHandler, I would just let Spring figure out what to use (no need for @Autowire injection nor any additional creation methods):

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
    @Bean public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers(
            WhiteColourHandler whiteHandler, 
            BlueColourHandler blueHandler, 
            RedColourHandler redHandler) {
        Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> map = new EnumMap<>();
        map.put(WHITE, whiteHandler);
        map.put(BLUE, blueHandler);
        map.put(RED, redHandler);
        return map;
    }
}
2

This is actually pretty simple but you need to know how:

 @Autowired private ColourHandler whiteColourHandler;
 ...

 public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> getColourHander() {
     Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> result = ...;
     map.put( ColourEnum.white, whiteColourHandler );
     ...
     return map;
 }

The trick is that you can inject beans into a config.

2

Similar to the accepted answer except that, instead of autowiring components, you can declare the beans in the configuration class as usual and pass them as arguments to the Map bean method:

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
    @Bean public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers(ColourHandler whiteHandler) {
        Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> map = new EnumMap<>();
        map.put(WHITE, whiteHandler);
        return map;
    }

    @Bean public ColourHandler whiteHandler() {
        return new WhiteHandler();
    }
}

Also note that the injection of the map as a @Resource doesn't need the annotation's "name" parameter if the field name follows the same naming convention as the bean definition.

i.e. This would work without the name parameter:

@Resource
private Map<ColourHandlerEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers;

but this would require it:

@Resource(name="colourHandlers")
private Map<ColourHandlerEnum, ColourHandler> handlers;
0

You can have the ColourHandler class itself define its own type, this way you will not have to keep changing your config class when you get new types:

public interface ColourHander {
    ColourEnum getType();
}
@Component
public class RedColourHandler implements ColourHander{
    @Override
    public ColourEnum getType() {
        return ColourEnum.RED;
    }
}

And in your config class you get all ColourHandlers and map them to their type.

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
    @Bean 
    public Map<ColourEnum, ColourHandler> colourHandlers(List<ColourHandler> colourHandlers) {
        return colourHandlers.stream().collect(toMap(ColourHandler::getType, x -> x));
    }
}

Note that you will get an IllegalStateException in case you have more than one handler per color, which I guess is the expected behaviour, you can catch it and throw your own.

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